Does this slap technique sound right?

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by Daytona955i, Mar 8, 2006.

  1. Daytona955i


    Feb 17, 2005
    Albany, NY
    I made a short (3 second) clip of just one little slap riff, I really haven't been a bass player for too long, and I've been playing with a pick and I've slowly started to learn how to double and triple with my fingers, but I still don't feel that I'm precise enough to play like that in the band setting, but anyway, just listenand let me know if you think it sounds right?
  2. It sounds like you're doing it right. You need a little finesse, but you've got the basic idea. You could probably be a little more gentle too. Generally, you want just as much slap as necessary, but no more. It's easier that way.
  3. Nico3535


    Mar 8, 2006
    I agree the lighter and smother the slap the more it flows. I'll tell you what helped me get my slap game up was gettinga hand drum. After seeing primus live, and hearing tommy the cat live i had figured it out, its all percussion.
  4. Two words... "Slap it!" Tony Oppenheim

    This book is what I used years ago to learn the mysterious world of slappin' and poppin' - it is very easy to understand with this book. And back when I bought the book it came with, what at the time was a state-of-the-art teaching aid - a sound page! Now I don't know how old you are, but in the old days, before CD's and MP3's we used to use this thing that the rappers and DJ's use today, called a 'turntable' to play our 'records' on... This sound page was a flimsy, vinyl, square 45 that let me hear these exercises as I was reading the notes... All the differnce in the world! Get 'Slap it!' today and I promise you, next week you will be slappin' and poppin' like a pro!

  5. bassicallysteve


    Jan 4, 2006
    I listened to your sound file and apart from what may or not be a slight timing issue (i don't know what tune you are playing) it sounds fine to me dude.
  6. Try doing it to a metronome, record it, and play it back. See if you are in time. Once you can do it smoothly and not struggle to stay with the metronome, you're ready for prime time.