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Dont let this happen to you!!!

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Fire-Starter, Dec 28, 2003.


  1. Fire-Starter

    Fire-Starter Supporting Member

    Aug 11, 2002
    MINNESOTA
    I was adj the trust rod on my peavey tl-6 and SNAP:mad: I did not turn it that hard or far, and I have adj this several times before do to the climate changes here in the midwest, I just sat there for 5-10 minuets looking at what I thought was a bad dream,I guess now I have a bass that will be a wall fixture forever:spit: despite that, I am still a happy guy:D despite the angry/spit faces you see in my post.

    I have never had this happen, but is there any hope for this bass:confused:
     
  2. bizzaro

    bizzaro

    Aug 21, 2000
    Vermont
    :eek:

    Is it a neck though or bolt on. If it is a bolt on the cheapest way to fix it may be replacethe neck if the truss rod is actually broken. The labor to remove the fretboard and replace the Truss rod I am guessing will be more than The price of a new neck. Maybe not.
     
  3. Fire-Starter

    Fire-Starter Supporting Member

    Aug 11, 2002
    MINNESOTA
    its a neck through:bawl: :bawl: :bawl:
     
  4. warwickbass

    warwickbass

    Dec 8, 2001
    Minnesota
    This all really confuses me, I had been adjusting my truss rod on my Warwick thumb bolt on 5str slowly, no more than a half turn a day, I then took it into work to have a fella that I work with tell me what was going on... cause it seemed like I had been getting nowhere. Hes a luthier and took one look at it, set it down and made 2 full quick turns, looked again, and made one more full turn, and there it was, perfect. he told me that all that tells ya is that every truss rod is different, and their ment to be turned. every rod had a different response to being turned depending on the rod and your neck, but that whole no more than a quarter or half turn a day stuff is complete B.S., you turn it as far or as little as it needs and it will be fine.... Ive seen a picture of the guy that owns Warwick standing on one of his necks propped up between 2 chairs, so their strong ... why you had a problem with it i have no clue, all i know is theres a lot of poor poor information out there regarding the subject
     
  5. Eric Moesle

    Eric Moesle Supporting Member

    Sep 21, 2001
    Columbus OH
    Extremely bad advice, in my opinion. Most truss rods will snap with that much turning - most simply aren't designed for that much movement after they've already been tightened to general playability. I've never had to turn a rod more than 1/4 turn on any of my many basses over the years to adjust for climate changes.
     
  6. Hollow Man

    Hollow Man Supporting Member

    Apr 28, 2003
    Springfield, VA
    Warwick necks are definitely thick, but I'd never crank a truss rod like that on a Warwick or any other bass. I've been in the presence of people adjusting truss rods carefully and slowly, and you could still hear the wood splinter slightly. The point is, though some necks may be able to take harsh abuse (i.e. anything much more than a quarter turn or so per day) it's likely never worth the risk. If you can afford to replace your neck if you overdo your truss rod adjustments, you can afford to take to a capable, insured luthier and have them get it right the first time.
     
  7. warwickbass

    warwickbass

    Dec 8, 2001
    Minnesota
    you see it wasnt that it needed alot of turning because the neck was way out of whack, it needed alot of turning because thats how many turns of the rod it took to move a small ammount, i was making quarter turns with almost absolutly no movement of the neck... hence how every truss rod is diffrent, they all have diffrent reactions to diffrent actions.
     
  8. why the hell are you happy? your bass snapped.
     
  9. Fire-Starter

    Fire-Starter Supporting Member

    Aug 11, 2002
    MINNESOTA
    I put it into perspective,

    1:Some people just wish they had someone to talk to. (that can be a lonely place)
    2:Children worldwide are homeless and hungry (THIS SHOULD NOT BE :mad: )
    3:I still have 8 basses, some people wish they just had one..(and I dont mean this in a boastful way,)
    4:I still have a God and Jesus in my life, (not to turn this into a thread about religion, but its the truth, and you did ask:cool: )

    5:I had got the inside scoop that my Ken Smith BSR6MW was planning to jump the PeaveyTL-6 in the middle of the night and break his neck anyhow,word in my bassment was the TL-6 was talking trash about the BSR6MW, and the Smith basses don't play that crap:cool:

    6: They are not the expensive, I could save up and get another one.

    7: My ken Smith BSR6MW does not have to hear my TL-6 shoot off its mouth about how it thinks it the best six string in my bassment anymore, cant talk with your neck broke:D

    8: It could have been my Ken Smith! THEN THIS THREAD MIGHT HAVE A DIFFERENT TONE..well maybe :)


    PEACE TO YOU FRIEND!
     
  10. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    You seem to be saying that you had already been turning the TR nut enough to expect results and nothing was changing in the relief. You carried it to a luthier who just took a quick look at the bass and then proceded to turn it three full turns and then the relief was OK.

    No need for you to be confused. You were loosening the nut and he retightened it. It's easy to tell if the nut is loose by the torque that's needed to turn it. You had the nut completely loose by around three turns. I will promise you that most TRs will break if you tighten it more than three turns from a NORMAL position. You cannot stretch a 3/16" rod 1/8" without it breaking.

    The reason the 1/4 turn per day thing is emphasized so strongly is to prevent a newby from over adjusting a TR. Most of the people who use setup aren't luthiers.

    Most people get into trouble because they simply don't or can't undersand the mechanics of a proper setup. Some people simply don't have the mechanical aptitude to be attempting setup. If you can't change your own oil or repair a leaky spigot, you probably should leave setup to a qualified repair person.

    I agree that there is a lot of poor info "out there" on the subject. Most of the poor advice seems to be that relief is an action adjustment and needs constant tweaking. Nothing could be further from the truth. My TR hasn't been adjusted for well over a year and my bass plays like butter.
     
  11. rumblethump

    rumblethump Supporting Member

    Mar 25, 2000
    Pioneer CA. 95666
    I'd contact Peavey and see what they would charge to fix it. They are a very customer service oriented company.

    Good luck and great attitude.
     
  12. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    This is how a lot of that "poor information" that you describe comes about. I dont recall seeing a standard TR that didn't have 32 threads to the inch. That means that one turn moves the nut 1/32". Your few quarter turns plus the luthiers four turns moved the TR nut more than 1/8". More than enough to break a normally adjusted TR.

    You were given some questionable info IMHO.


    Harrell S.
     
  13. bizzaro

    bizzaro

    Aug 21, 2000
    Vermont
    I can hear truss rods popping all over the world.
    OUCH!!!!! :eek: :bawl: :eek: :bawl:
     
  14. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    LOL. Me too.
     
  15. you sure are optimistic.
     
  16. Fire-Starter

    Fire-Starter Supporting Member

    Aug 11, 2002
    MINNESOTA
    I'm 42, it has taken some practice:D

    Peace to you:cool:
     
  17. warwickbass

    warwickbass

    Dec 8, 2001
    Minnesota
    Actually I was tightening the nut and he tightened it further.. the thing is, my action wasn't that bad before I started doing it, what im confused about is that, as has been pointed out, that would snap some rods... but not mine for what ever reason. thats what leads me to believe that not all truss rods are created equally.

    I hope this isnt coming across like im trying to sick it to anyone, cause im not, just trying to figure out what in the world is going on... and i guess hijacking the thread a little... sorry :meh:
     
  18. Eric Moesle

    Eric Moesle Supporting Member

    Sep 21, 2001
    Columbus OH
    Don't discount the possibility that your truss rod, prior to your initial 1/4 turns, was alread loose and non-engaged. Your neck just might have been stable enough that the truss rod was loose and not effecting the neck at all. You can turn it and turn it, and it still wouldn't affect the neck at all until it started to tighten up further up the threads of the rod. I'm not saying this was the case, but its entirely possible. Your luthier probably felt the slack on the truss nut and kept rotating full turns until he felt a little tension. You wouldn't have had a wenge neck by chance, would you???
     
  19. warwickbass

    warwickbass

    Dec 8, 2001
    Minnesota
    no, its a 2000 model... so no such luck. the thing that makes me think that my truss rod was engaged is that it took quite a bit of effort to move it... now granted i havent done too many setups in my life, but if that wasnt engaged, i would hate to see how much force it would take to move one that is.
     
  20. warwickbass

    warwickbass

    Dec 8, 2001
    Minnesota
    come to think of it, i dont think the warwick truss rods can even be "disengaged" can they... since their the two way dealies?