Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by kearney, Dec 22, 2004.

  1. kearney


    Jul 5, 2004
    so, i was playin guitar (please dont lynch me!!!) and i wanted to play along to my rolling stones rock n roll circus DVD, so as i was touching the strings, i pressed the eject button on the dvd player,

    120 volts right thru me!!!! it did what my friend informed me is called a "ground loop"

    so this amp is a big ol stinkin P.O.F.S.

    and no one wants to buy a shocking amp, specially one thats only 75 watts
  2. geshel


    Oct 2, 2001
    eek, ouch. THat's not a "ground loop", a better term would be "faulty ground". (ground loops mostly cause noise in the signal).

    And if your strings weren't grounded . . . wouldn't have happened.
  3. P. Aaron

    P. Aaron Supporting Member

    A 75 watt amp in the hands of even a beginning guitarist can be a lethal weapon.
  4. IvanMike

    IvanMike Player Characters fear me... Staff Member Supporting Member

    Nov 10, 2002
    Middletown CT, USA
    good chance it may not be your amp but the wiring in your house. Are you using the ground plugs on your amp? and are the outlets in your house properly grounded? This could be a problem with your amp or cd player, but it could be in your house as well. not something to mess with. these situations can be lethal.
  5. slugworth

    slugworth Banned

    Jun 12, 2003
    So. Calif.
    Good thing it wasn't 220/240, or you could have been the guitarist in St. Peter's Rock & Roll revival band...I always
    use a power strip with a ground fault indicator. If the red
    light comes on, I don't power up.

    Be careful

  6. Jason Carota

    Jason Carota Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 1, 2002
    Lowell, MA

  7. It's a sign, don't take it lightly :)
  8. FenderHotRod


    Sep 1, 2004

    Oh 220 is not that bad. It is when it throws you against a wall when it hurts.

    and 120 is nothing more then just a bee sting.

    still it is no fun getting bit.
  9. Aaron Saunders

    Aaron Saunders

    Apr 27, 2002
    +1 :D
  10. What amp were you using? I see a Kustom K150 in your sig, was that it?

    If so, and the amp hasn't been modernized with a 3-prong cord, it's a simple problem, and an easy fix. The amp's 2 prong cord must be replaced with a grounded 3 prong.

    The amp's polarity switch has a capacitor that is intended to reduce hum in the old ungrounded circuits. One leg of this capacitor goes to the chassis of the amp. This cap can leak, after all you're talking a 30+ year old amp. This leakage makes the chassis "hot" if the chassis isn't grounded and if the chassis is hot, anything on your guitar that has an exposed metal ground is hot.

    When putting in the 3 prong cord, snip the leads to the capacitor that's on the polarity switch. Problem solved.

    And if your amp has a little hum to it when your guitar cord's not plugged in...your power supply capacitors need replacing. Another relatively simple upgrade.
  11. When I was a toddler ( 10 years old )
    My cousin told me to hold this 20cent piece ( coin ) on a electric fence and yep Kapow although it's not what you went thru but does that count?