Dooh! Super Glue Super Mess.

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Rum Ham, Jul 6, 2019.


  1. Buff and polish

    4 vote(s)
    28.6%
  2. Leave and don't make it worse

    7 vote(s)
    50.0%
  3. Give it away and never play again

    3 vote(s)
    21.4%
  1. Rum Ham

    Rum Ham

    Jan 28, 2018
    Ohio
    Here is my situation.
    I have a AVRI 2004 Fender '62 Jazz.
    Sunburst finish. The screws for the strap buttons kept backing out over time.
    I'd snug 'em up and go about my day.
    Til I got a genius idea to squirt a little super glue onto the threads to keep 'em in.
    So I take the glue+screw+extra generous squirt and screw them back in.
    But the excess went all over my finish.
    No prob right? Just scrape it off..
    No. Not even close to working without gouging my finish.
    So I searched for nail polish remover (STUPID!). Because it's acetone.
    Well, it got the glue...and a portion of my finish too.

    Its not to noticeable, but I KNOW, and it is driving me bonkers. Its all I see when I play it. And it's like Abagail (my bass) knows it.
    I think it is a nitro finish. I think. The area affected just looks dull and somewhat porous. So my question is there anything I can do, with competence, to repair it?
    And by repair I mean return it to a glossy appearance?
    Or is it a better idea to leave it?
    It's my baby. And I let her down.
    Thanks.
     
  2. Killed_by_Death

    Killed_by_Death Snaggletooth Inactive

    Like the local luthier told me once, sometimes the best fix is knowing when to stop trying to fix it.

    BTW, the original solution was to just put toothpicks in the strap-button holes.
     
    Atshen, bigbassmike, Axstar and 2 others like this.
  3. Rum Ham

    Rum Ham

    Jan 28, 2018
    Ohio
    Good advice. Never heard the toothpick trick. I'm kinda leaning towards letting it be.
     
    Killed_by_Death likes this.
  4. Winslow

    Winslow

    Sep 25, 2011
    Group "W" Bench
    Sounds like the screws had slowly stripped the holes over time, and the threads could no longer hold. The first instinct most folks have is to twist them back in, but that only turns the threads, letting them strip out more material. But KbD is right: Toothpicks and a small amount of wood glue are often the best trick to fix stripped holes in wood (that's just one example of several tutorials you can find). Bonus: If you get any squeeze-out, wood glue generally cleans up nicely with nothing more than a little water on a cloth. (Check the bottle's instructions to make sure what kind it is.) Personally, I've always had good results with Tite-Bond II (blue label) on all manner of wood projects.

    Sorry about the new spot on your "baby," but I think she'll forgive you. Look at it this way: Now, she's truly and uniquely your own! ;)

    Good luck! :thumbsup:
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2019
    Rum Ham and Killed_by_Death like this.
  5. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Supporting Member

    Toothpicks, also used with a couple of drops of white glue (such as Elmer's or Titebond), are the common fix.

    I think you might be well advised to leave it as is and consider how valuable this was as a learning experience.
     
    Rum Ham likes this.
  6. KenB

    KenB

    Jul 15, 2008
    Yellow Springs, OH
    Before I vote can you post a picture of the damage? Did the acetone remove the top layer of finish, or only dull the surface?

    If the blemished finish is limited to the area right around the strap button at least it would be hidden when using a strap...
     
    Rum Ham likes this.
  7. bigtone23

    bigtone23

    Dec 10, 2014
    Denver, CO
    Yikes! Toothpicks or toothpicks with wood glue are the most common and easy fixes, which comes up on pretty much any guitar/bass forum at least once every couple weeks.
    Ironically, superglue is a common way to spot fix nitro finishes...
    I'd stop while you are ahead. It's just a flesh wound.
     
    Rum Ham likes this.
  8. Rum Ham

    Rum Ham

    Jan 28, 2018
    Ohio
    Thanks for detailing the process for me. It is much appreciated. Truly
    The fix you and Killed_by_Death described it way more practical/logical than my mess.
    And thanks for the kind words on my "baby".
    I guess something was gonna happen eventually, and the mistake came from trying to right a wrong. Good intention, bad result.
     
    Winslow likes this.
  9. Rum Ham

    Rum Ham

    Jan 28, 2018
    Ohio
    Thanks Pilgrim. If I can't safely repair it, more than likely I'm just gonna let it be a learning experience. Thanks again.
     
  10. Rum Ham

    Rum Ham

    Jan 28, 2018
    Ohio
    Here she is, and here is my buffoonery.
    20190708_180849.jpg 20190708_180713.jpg 20190708_180702.jpg
     
    Guzzi Toad and Matt Liebenau like this.
  11. Winslow

    Winslow

    Sep 25, 2011
    Group "W" Bench
    First, that's a freaking gorgeous bass. I've got a sunburst Jazz as well, so you automatically have good taste! :D

    As damage goes, that looks fairly limited. It's not on the forward-facing part of the body, and on top of that, if you play it for a long enough span of time, that same area will see plenty of strap wear anyway. Someone here with more experience with refinishing may have some advice, but absent that, I think you could chalk it up to a good lesson well learned, and carry on.

    Everything sees some "mileage" from its time on the planet. Nothing wrong with an instrument that carries a few stories along with it! :thumbsup:
     
    Rum Ham likes this.
  12. sissy kathy

    sissy kathy Back to Bass-ics Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2014
    Arbutus, MD
    You have discovered the limits of your competence. Take it to a pro.
     
    byacey, Guzzi Toad and Rum Ham like this.
  13. Rum Ham

    Rum Ham

    Jan 28, 2018
    Ohio
    Thank you for the compliment. She is my baby and I try to keep her pristine.
    I'm gonna let my mistake ride until I met someone competent in refinishing.
    I dont need the whole body redone, just 3in by 3in area.
    Its got that beautiful yellowing of the nitro and I dont want to interrupt that.
     
  14. Rum Ham

    Rum Ham

    Jan 28, 2018
    Ohio
    Very True, thanks for the honesty. Sometimes you don't know til you goof it up.
     
  15. sissy kathy

    sissy kathy Back to Bass-ics Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2014
    Arbutus, MD
    I just replaced the bell tenon on a clarinet. I epoxied the new tenon on. I used a cardboard tube to keep the two pieces aligned while the epoxy cured. I now have to sand out a bunch of cardboard from inside the clarinet. AFTER doing this, I realized had I wrapped the cardboard in plastic wrap, my sanding would be minimal. DOH! Live and learn.
     
    Rum Ham likes this.
  16. Rum Ham

    Rum Ham

    Jan 28, 2018
    Ohio
    I hear ya on that! I wish I didn't always have to learn the hard way. But at least we can pass on our knowledge to stop the cycle of buffoonery.
     
  17. Yellow Bang66

    Yellow Bang66

    Jun 5, 2019
    Yeah take it to a repair guy, or watch Stew Macs video on how to drop fill a finish with crazy glue. The one where Dan shows how to scrape crazy glue down with a razor and repair finish chips with crazy glue. I've done it with my "baby" and it's virtually invisible! just take your time & it'll be fine. You just need a razor, some wet/dry sandpaper patience & time. take heart she'll be fine again soon!
     
    Rum Ham likes this.
  18. Yellow Bang66

    Yellow Bang66

    Jun 5, 2019
    Yeah take it to a repair guy, or watch Stew Macs video on how to drop fill a finish with crazy glue. The one where Dan shows how to scrape crazy glue down with a razor and repair finish chips with crazy glue. I've done it with my "baby" and it's virtually invisible! just take your time & it'll be fine. You just need a razor, some wet/dry sandpaper patience & time. take heart she'll be fine again soon!
     
    Rum Ham likes this.
  19. KenB

    KenB

    Jul 15, 2008
    Yellow Springs, OH
    Rum, I see you are located in Ohio. Are you located anywhere near Athens?
    You might consider taking your bass to Dan Erlewine’s shop...

    Dan Erlewine's Guitar Shop

    He’s the head guru at Stewart MacDonald, and literally wrote the book regarding finish repairs.

    Just a thought, but you might as well go with the best!
     
    Rum Ham likes this.
  20. Rum Ham

    Rum Ham

    Jan 28, 2018
    Ohio
    I'm in the Cleveland area. B
    I think if anything I will take it to a pro.
    I am at my threshold of competence in fine wood finishing. I am certified to wipe it off and change strings. I should've stopped there. Thanks for responding Yellowbang, I think I'm gonna go with the Pro that KenB
    recommended. I travel that way sometimes so that works for me. Thanks Ken and Yellowbang 66.
     
    Yellow Bang66 likes this.
  21. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Jun 18, 2021

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