1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  
     
    TalkBass.com has been uniting the low end since 1998.  Join us! :)

Dorian with Jaco fingering

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by catcauphonic, Aug 1, 2012.


  1. catcauphonic

    catcauphonic High Freak of the Low Frequencies Supporting Member

    Mar 30, 2012
    Seattle WA
    I had been practicing all the modes from books for a few months, & thought I had nailed the Dorian scale pretty good. All the books I have that mention it show it as R-2-3 on the first string, 4-5 on the second, & 6-7-8 on the third, with a shift somewhere between first & third. During my last lesson my instructor brought up the Dorian mode for the first time, and he stressed his preference of Jaco fingering on this mode - reaching big between index & middle fingers on the second string to play the 4-5, then playing the 6 with your pinkie - so you technically don't have to make any hand shift. I'm curious as to how much more practical this may be in any playing situation, & how many other people routinely use this fingering?
     
  2. funkybass

    funkybass

    Oct 19, 2006
    Indiana
    I don't know how practical that fingering is, but you need to know several fingerings for any scale you know.
     
  3. jsbarber

    jsbarber

    Jun 7, 2005
    San Diego
    I took a few, very few, guitar lessons and that was a scale playing technique that I was shown. You can do the same thing for the major scale, ionian mode. 1, stretch 2, 4; 1, stretch 2, 4; 3, 4. So, I think some guitarists do this a lot. Two things: Jaco had very long fingers (see photo); your ability to do this may depend on what position you're at on the neck. Down by the nut it might be very hard to do the stretch, but higher up it should be easier.

    FWIW,

    Jim
     

    Attached Files:

  4. bass_study

    bass_study

    Apr 17, 2012
    There is 3 fingering for Dorian when i 1st learnt the bass. The 2 you have mentioned and the one which uses all 4 strings and start with pinky.

    Like A Dorian
    Pinky on 5 fret of E string
    Then fret 2 3 5 played with index, middle and pinky on A string
    Fret 2 4 5 with index, third and pinky on D string
    Fret 2 with index on A string

    If you know more fingering, you have more option when u practise a bassline.
     
  5. theretheyare

    theretheyare Supporting Member

    Sep 4, 2010
    Brooklyn, NY
    Endorsing: Arkham Vacuum Tube Amplification
    I think this is also known as the 3-fingers per string technique, which is exactly what is says it is, and works great for any 7-note scale (the diatonic modes and its altered variations). Advantages:
    -easier to play a scale over more than 1 octave,
    -any scale becomes a variation of the basic pattern, rather than that 1 way to finger only works for 1 particular scale. For example, take A major: E-string pos. 5-7-9 (fingers 1-2/3-4) A string pos 5-7-9(fingers 1-2/3-4) D-string pos 6-7 (fingers 1-2). to change from A Major to A Dorian is simply to pull back the pinky 1 fret on the E string(lowering the 3rd) and pull back the index one fret (lowing the 7th) on the D string. Any altered scale becomes a breeze to play this way through this simple logic, and it's a bit more musical, since you will be thinking in altering steps, rather than this or that fingering.
     

Share This Page