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Double Bass Essential Elements 2000 books

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by edspyhill01, Mar 10, 2008.


  1. edspyhill01

    edspyhill01 Guest

    Has anyone had experience using the following book to begin playing/learning Double Bass?

    Essential Elements for Strings 2000 - Book 1 - Double Bass (A Comprehensive String Method) - Hal Leonard

    Ed S.
     
  2. Ed,

    I have all three volumes. I used vol. 1 a bit when I first started out last April to work on my reading skills and for building up my pizz chops. I'm learning to bow now -- earplugs, everybody! -- and will be using some of the exercises further along in that book to play arco duets with my instructor in the coming weeks. It's a good series. I'll probably work through the other two books on my own when my lessons move in a different direction.
     
  3. edspyhill01

    edspyhill01 Guest

    Thank you.

    Ed S.
     
  4. Heifetzbass

    Heifetzbass Commercial User

    Feb 6, 2004
    Upstate, SC
    Owner, Gencarelli Bass Works and Fine String Instruments, LLC.
    I teach all the instruments in a classroom setting and have met all 3 authors of the book. Pam Telejohn Hayes was my beginning strings teacher!:hyper:

    However, I would use the "My First Simandl" book when starting beginning double bass private students. There is a lot of material in the EE book that is not geared towards private instruction.

    IMHO
    Brian
     
  5. edspyhill01

    edspyhill01 Guest

    Brian,

    I was able to do a "Look Inside" at sheetmusicplus and this is the information I was looking for. Thank you. I started searching for a double bass teacher close to home. The area keeps expanding.

    Here's a question that just popped in my head - do I take a bass with me to lessons or is there one provided by a teacher that the student can use?

    Ed S.
     
  6. CamMcIntyre

    CamMcIntyre

    Jun 6, 2000
    USA
    By and large-you will bring your bass to lessons.

    I bought the EE books from Bob G a few years ago. I like them-they gave me a nice introduction. When i started studying up here-i ended up working out of The Simandl & Michael Moore books.
     
  7. Heifetzbass

    Heifetzbass Commercial User

    Feb 6, 2004
    Upstate, SC
    Owner, Gencarelli Bass Works and Fine String Instruments, LLC.
    Ed-

    You will definitely need to bring a bass. I would suggest bringing yours to your lessons so at least your instructor can tune it. Also, they may want to make a couple little marks to help you locate the first notes and shape your hand correctly. It won't do you any good if you don't have your bass there.

    My beef with teaching EE in a private lesson is that it is out of sequence in spots for my approach with a private student. I prefer not to start in D major with a private student. I would prefer to start in G major so no shifting is involved for the first couple lessons.

    EE is a great book, however it is a class room method book. I seriously doubt you will find too many violin, viola, or cello private teachers who use it as well.

    FWIW
    Brian
     
  8. edspyhill01

    edspyhill01 Guest

    Thank you to all for the replies and advice. A copy of "My First Simandl" is in the mail from SheetMusicPlus. A used copy of the Essential Elements Bass book1 one is on the way also. Currently looking for DB teachers. Nothing close to home or work but I'm still looking.
     

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