Double Thumb: Beyond sextuplets

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by embellisher, Aug 18, 2002.

  1. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    EGADS! Not another double thumb thread!:eek:

    I have been working on the standard sextuplet that Victor Wooten uses. Slap open string, left hand hammer two notes in succession, slap downstroke, slap upstroke, pop. I've got that one down pretty good, even on my six string.

    But now, my brain cannot comprehend how to extend this technique further. So, I need some guidance from you slap gurus out there.:) What can I do to take it to the next level?
  2. Lipis Roman

    Lipis Roman

    Mar 5, 2002
    I'm definitely no slap guru, but there's a couple things I practice that you might be interested in. One thing I work on is to do what you have described only I start of with a muted right hand slap before the open string slap, and I add an extra pop at the end. It's kinda tricky to really get em rolling one after the other (for me anyway) but it sounds pretty damn cool when you get it flowing.

    One of the other things I'm working on is basically the same thing only you ommit the first muted right hand slap and keep the double pop (I know there's a word of that) at the end.

    I hope this has been of some use to ya.

    [edit] Forgot to mention. On applying the muted slap to the technique you described, I found it easier to apply double thumbing to that. Meaning that I do the muted slap on the down stroke and I pluck the open string on the up stroke afterwards. I find it to be more of a fluent motion that way, seems more natural. Hope that makes sense, I'm not to he best at describing this stuff in text.
  3. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    Thanks for the tips. They took a few moments to digest, but after thinking about them, they now make perfect sense. Two more things to work into my technique drills.:cool:
  4. Lipis Roman

    Lipis Roman

    Mar 5, 2002
    No problem man, enjoy.:)
  5. Poparad


    Jan 18, 2002

    There's a transcription of Classical Thump. I'm working on that one right now and there are a lot of ideas for using the double thumbing that aren't sextuplets/triplets. Sometimes the feel for sixteenths is hard since the hand motion is in threes but the music is in fours.
  6. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    well, about two months ago I sat down, learned classical thump(well the best I could muster by ear)
    and spent hours daily working on my double thumb techniques.
    one thing I came across(in response to embezzler's initial post)
    is a little stretch from a standard double thumb tech...but it provides more than six notes
    basically it involves strumming down with you index and middle(off set a bit) at the end of the sextuplet
    combined with another slight hammer on and its nine notes....though its stretching the whole "how many notes can you get with one down up motion"
    this is really something for the upper strings....I don't know...its really just a thought..I haven't really gotten good at it yet.
    thinking about a better way to describe it...I fall short...but maybe it wil help a little :)

    double thumb is a fun technique...but after using it a while I realize how much of a novelty type use-every-once-in-a-while-to-spice-things-up-and-not-
    throughout the-whole-song type technique

    double thump slap/pop meets flamenco strumming stuffis is a kindof describtion that I just thought of :)
  7. Christopher


    Apr 28, 2000
    New York, NY
    The easiest way to take it further is to eliminate the fingers. Just play everything you normally play, except using thumb-up and thumb-down strokes only.

    Adding fingers only promotes "pattern playing."
  8. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    eliminating the fingers will get your thumb used to the up/down thing to begin with....but if you already have that down then the next step is to incorperate your fingers. at least the way I see it.