Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by kuamer, Sep 11, 2000.

  1. kuamer


    Aug 28, 2000
    dear all,

    i noticed the topic of chords. this includes the basic: Root, 5th, octave. i use these "chords" often in my music.
    My band's axes are tuned down to Dropped D, so holding the 5th fret of the A string and the 7th fret of the G string( with the others open) gives a rich full bass sound. i mostly give this a strum during a bridge or a last ringing note.

    As for doublestops they are simply the 5th and octave in these 3-note chords. played like this

    check out Flea and the chili peppers for doublestops. a Great example is there song Blood Sugar Sex Magik off the album of the same name...later


    [Edited by kuamer on 09-11-2000 at 05:21 PM]
  2. JimK


    Dec 12, 1999
    Other notable "double stops"(oft used in Funk)-

    Tritones(will actually LOOK like a flatted 5th interval; really, though, it's the 3rd & b7).
    So, if you're playing an OPEN "E"(ROOT NOTE), follow that with a "D"(D-string/12th fret)& a "G#"(G-string/13th fret). Sounds cool when you slide into from a half-step below.
    Part II of this sorta double stop is INVERTING the, again, while playing the OPEN "E", play the "G#"(D-string/18th fret?)and the "D"(G-string/19th fret). Again(again), slide into it from a 1/2 step below.

    Another standard Funk/Latin thingee-
    The 10th...
    Play a "B"(E-string/7th fret)while playing a "D#"(G-string/8th fret). Of course, you can FLAT the 10th(will give a MINOR 3rd vibe).
    Check out Steely Dan's "Peg"(Rainey is a master at double stops), EW&F's "Shining Star"(the chorus), even Cracker's "Low" utilizes a D/F# double stop.
    Cool stuff when done tastefully...
  3. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Commercial User

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    Boom Bass Cabinets, DR strings
    Stanley Clarke gained prominence on electric with the 10ths and I-V doublestops.

    Another simple and useful doublestop would be an open string, the 11th fret on the next higher string and the 9th fret on the next higher string, basically a I-III-V (1-3-5).
    Drop the middle note down a fret and you have a minor tritone. Experiment with moving either upper note, you'll probably be surprised with how many useful double-stops you can work against an open string.

    I use 5th-10th combos quite a bit, too.