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Drawing Plans

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by ii7-V7, Jan 13, 2006.


  1. ii7-V7

    ii7-V7

    Aug 4, 2002
    Baltimore, MD
    I conducted a search and was surprised to find almost nothing related to drawing out full sized plans for basses. I mean I saw threads telling people to do so, but nothing about how to get it done.

    Maybe this seems like a silly question, but humor the design challenged, and tell me how you go about drawing your full-sized plans.

    Chad
     
  2. Chad, you didn't look enough...

    http://www.talkbass.com/forum/showthread.php?t=206698&highlight=Drawing+programs
     
  3. Several pieces of A2 paper. Ruler. Pencil. Eraser.
     
  4. ii7-V7

    ii7-V7

    Aug 4, 2002
    Baltimore, MD
    Goodness,

    After reading that thread I think I will stick to pencil and paper. I really don't want to become an engineer I just want to build a bass!

    I wouldn't even know where to begin.
     
  5. full_bleed

    full_bleed

    May 27, 2005
    Arizona
    I was using photoshop to make my drawings before but I was never really sure of the demensions of anything that I was designing and going purely off of what looks right. I have recently switched to using corel draw which with very little time spent working with it, it is very easy to use and firgure out. Since switching in just the last week I think?, I have already drawn up 4 more designs that I like quite a bit that are full scale size ready to be printed and used to make templates including all the routing for pickups and a recessed bridge. After reading the top carving thread I might throw some lines on there to represent the steps for that process. If I want a more realistic view of the bass I simply import it into photoshop and work with it from there.
     
  6. callmeMrThumbs

    callmeMrThumbs Guest

    Oct 6, 2005
    Omaha, NE
    I do rough sketches by hand on paper, scan it to my computer, paste it in Powerpoint (not joking), then I trace everything and go from there. Works great, believe it or not...and it's free. I don't know about full scale drawings, though.

    -Josh
     
  7. Suburban

    Suburban

    Jan 15, 2001
    lower mid Sweden
    But you have to! Designing an intrument is high-level engineering (take it from a mech engineer since 25+ years)!

    Now, making the plans for an instrument doesn't need an engineering software. It doesn't need software at all, actually. It's done just as well with pencil on paper.

    If you work on computer, then you will need to print it, for sure. The easy way is to make it less wide than the paper is high, then you can print it in several pieces and tape them together. Otherwise, you can probably find a prinitng service with a drum plotter, normally used for advertizing or engineering, who can print from most CAD formats as well as Corel, jpg, even bmp!
     
  8. T-34

    T-34

    Aug 11, 2005
    France, Paris region
    +1
    Pencil sketches scanned and imported in Corel LT (enough for what I do) then traced manually. I print the fullscale on multiple A4.
     
  9. dooft11

    dooft11 Supporting Member

    Dec 30, 2003
    HongKong
    i just ran the first test on building a neck, and i find the result of plotting out CAD drawing and overlaying on the wood, work fine for me, especially laying out the fret position. CAD is really precise. I am using autocad, which we use in the architectural firm daily.
    :hyper:
     
  10. dooft11

    dooft11 Supporting Member

    Dec 30, 2003
    HongKong
    i can do it for you guys. as in AutoCad, i can export the file in form of DXF, AI(illustrator), or EPS.
     
  11. callmeMrThumbs

    callmeMrThumbs Guest

    Oct 6, 2005
    Omaha, NE
    I'm using AutoCAD at school...really good to work with. Of course, I've been plotting my bass behind my teacher's back while I'm not working on my split-level house, so....it's a slow process...hehe.

    -Josh
     
  12. If any of you that use Corel need some tips or pointers, just ask. I'm in my 14th year on the program having started with ver 1.

    Remember, you can illustrate with it too - as well as use it for all of your photo editing needs.