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dremel... yay or nay?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by g00eY, Mar 22, 2006.


  1. g00eY

    g00eY

    Sep 17, 2005
    Chicago, IL
    could i use a dremel for cutting neck pockets and cavities? just wondering...
     
  2. Fasoldt Basses

    Fasoldt Basses

    Mar 22, 2005
    Stevens Point, WI
    Karl Thompson, Builder (Formerly Fat Karl)
    If you used a forstner bit and drilled out the majority of the cavity, i suppose you could use a dremel for the edges. make sure your bits are good and sharp, though, and take it slow, only cutting 1/8" deep or so per pass. My experience with such work is that it needs to be done very slowly, or the bit will go to crap on you.:meh:
     
  3. WarwickThumb777

    WarwickThumb777

    Jan 17, 2006
    N.R.V-Virginia
    Registered Sex Offender
    I'd use a plunge router..But two chipmunks with an egg beater and a bullwhip could work as well.
     
  4. Geoff St. Germaine

    Geoff St. Germaine Commercial User

    You probably could, but I wouldn't.
     

  5. yeah... ive actually used this combo many a time... I had to give my chipmunks some the insentive though... i had to use walnut...
     
  6. callmeMrThumbs

    callmeMrThumbs Guest

    Oct 6, 2005
    Omaha, NE
    haha...probably would've been okay with a chesnut variety...

    -Josh
     
  7. WarwickThumb777

    WarwickThumb777

    Jan 17, 2006
    N.R.V-Virginia
    Registered Sex Offender
    I give em incentive..I give em' a an assortment of Macadamia Nuts.Then when they're not looking a put on my 10-hole Doc Martens..and run across the room full bore..and drop em 'n their nutz.After that..They'll dig to China to get out of the room..I throw in the bass...and some tools..and it's game time.
     
  8. g00eY

    g00eY

    Sep 17, 2005
    Chicago, IL
    what is a forstner bit? last time i went to Home Depot i saw nothing labeled with such a name...
     
  9. http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDU...ID=ccfgaddhgeedfffcgelceffdfgidglm.0&MID=9876
    [​IMG]
    It's a tool that lets you drill big, flat-bottomed holes. (wow, take the 'L' out of flat and you get a sentence with a WHOLE different meaning. :) )
    It also allows you to overlap holes. Spade bits don't do either that well.
     
  10. Fasoldt Basses

    Fasoldt Basses

    Mar 22, 2005
    Stevens Point, WI
    Karl Thompson, Builder (Formerly Fat Karl)
    fixed it for you ;) :D :eek: :rollno:
     
  11. WarwickThumb777

    WarwickThumb777

    Jan 17, 2006
    N.R.V-Virginia
    Registered Sex Offender

    And you only have a couple more weeks of cold weather..Where you can slip a package of those Forstner bits under your heavy jacket and walk out..Crap..talk what you want I say..Made in India..screw em'.It great millions of dollars of imported crap from abroad..steal it..Put them out of business.
     
  12. Luke Sheridan

    Luke Sheridan Commercial User

    Dec 30, 2004
    Yonkers, NY
    I build guitars and sell them. Strings, too
    Flat bottom holes you make the routin' world go round!!
     
  13. rdhbass

    rdhbass

    Jun 28, 2003
    Springfield, mo
    what if you don't use a drill press with this forstner bit, should I not go so deep and finish out with a router bit? thanks. which router bit is good for a flat result on the bottom.
     
  14. nateo

    nateo Schubie Fan #1

    Mar 2, 2003
    Ottawa, Ontario
    I don't recommend Forstner bits in a hand drill. The big ones can exert a whole lot of torque and that can cause you some grief, either by making the bit hard to control and hurting your work piece or by giving your wrist a twist.

    Be that as it may, I have successfully used Forstner bits in a hand drill, but you need to be much more aware of what you're doing. Just don't drill too deep (finish with a router, like you suggested) and make sure that for every hole you drill the center point of the bit is in the wood. Without that stability you're not going to be having a very good time at all.

    Any flat tipped router bit should be able to give you a flat bottomed hole. Depending on your choice of templates and jigs (and tables, if you're using one) you may want either a standard flush cut bit with a bearing or a spiral bit. The bearing bits are great since you follow your template directly, but the spiral bits tend to cut nicer.

    -Nate

    PS: Luke wins my vote for best post in thread.
     
  15. pilotjones

    pilotjones Supporting Member

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    You deserve every bit of distrust, disrespect, and resentment you have earned by making this statement.
     

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