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driving 210 and 115

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Sharp, Aug 7, 2002.


  1. Sharp

    Sharp

    Jan 27, 2002
    Oakland
    Artists Relations, KMI
    does the SWR 350 bass amp have the power to drive a 210 and 115 speaker combination?

    -Tom
     
  2. Depends on what you're doing with it, Sharp.

    I play rock and blues and use a 2x10" and 1x15" under a 1000w Peavey amp and am thinking seriously about upgrading to a QSC RMX2450.

    IMO dissimilar cabinets need a stereo power amp so you can have a separate volume control for each cabinet. Most 2x10" cabs are a fair bit louder than most 1x15" cabs. I normally run my 2x10 at about 80% and the 1x15 full up on the power amp.

    For me, it's all about headroom. Since both my cabs are 8 ohm cabs and I choose not to bridge the amp it takes a fairly hefty amp to make the comes move the way I want them to. I never want to have to turn an amp up over halfway - but that's just me.

    Would I use an SWR 350? No - because I don't mix cabs on the same amp channel and on separate channels with 8 ohm cabs 350 watts just isn't enough juice for me - I'm not loud, but I like to think my tone is pretty clean.

    If price wasn't an object I'd say drive the stack with your favorite preamp and something like an RMX2450 - that'd give you 500 watts a side into 8 ohms.

    If price is an object I'd give some serious thought to either a SansAmp RBI (or a used preamp of your choice) and a Yamaha CP2000 power amp. It wouldn't cost much more than the SWR alone.
     
  3. Matthias

    Matthias

    May 30, 2000
    Vienna, Austria
    Allan has good points, but IMO it's no problem using the 350 with a 115 and 210 setup.
    Of cause you can run the two cabs with a more powerful amp to get more headroom. But once you got 1000W you could also say heck, why not get a 215 and 810 to get more out of the head. Viscious circle of GAS :D

    If you have got the SWR 350 already and you are looking for cabs a 115+210 stack is a good and popular choice. If you have got the 2 cabs and you are looking for an amp to power them, you could look for more power.

    I once played a Hartke 3500 (350W mono) through a 410 and 115 and it worked fine.

    It's true that the 10s will be louder, but the 115 will add some bottom the 10s simply don't have - the 115 is louder in the low register so to say.
    For this reason it's very common to run a 115 and a 210 or 410 from one fullrange channel.

    Matthias
     
  4. Sharp

    Sharp

    Jan 27, 2002
    Oakland
    Artists Relations, KMI
    i actually dont own a 350 yet, and $$ is the only big problem i have. 16 yrs old makes for a big cash flow problem. i dont need to fill an arena with 1000 watts or anything crazy like that, just something to fill larger rooms and the occasional theatre, some outside stuff. i was looking for something with 350-500 watts and relatively inexpensive with good tone. Seemed like a used SWR 350 was right, maybe im wrong. any suggestions would be good. i have about $500 for the head.
    thanks again, and thanks for the last 2 posts-
    Tom
     
  5. CtheOp

    CtheOp

    Oct 11, 2001
    Toronto, Canada
    Sharp:
    I have the SWR350 and I run a 2x10 cabinet along with a 1x15. Works great and sounds good. If you have the opportunity to get the 350 within your budget, go for it.
    For smaller venues I use the 2x10 cabinet by itself. For larger places I bring along the 15" as well. Dont forget the SWR350 also has the balanced XLR port on the rear panel. You can always go through the PA too (if your lucky enough to play a seriously large venue).

    Good luck.
     
  6. jobu3

    jobu3 Artist formerly known as Big Joe

    Feb 17, 2002
    Mountain Top, PA
    i just got rid of my swr bass 350. imho it didnt have close to enough headroom, but then again i have our area's loudest drummer in my band. i also talked to one of the techs at swr and he said that you CAN'T run it @2 ohms even though it says you can, and that the turning it up until it clips only to turn down again (as it says to in the owner's manual) is NOT a good idea. those were reasons i bought the head in the 1st place 450 watts at a 2 ohm load, welll it was a load of bull. i would find something that has more power. i got the hartke 7000 in its place and it has more than enough to suit my needs. my best advice is to go with as much power as you possibly can, it is better to have more than you'll ever need so that you don't lose money by trading. it sux having to upgrade...good luck finding something!
     
  7. Captain Awesome

    Captain Awesome

    Apr 2, 2001
    PDX
    That's the popular way to see it, but personally I don't think that is good reasoning, because the power sections of different amps have different levels of gain, and it's not always proportional to how beefy the power supply is. The volume knobs are just simple attenuators, after all, even if they go to 11.
     
  8. Sharp said...

    i actually dont own a 350 yet, and $$ is the only big problem i have. 16 yrs old makes for a big cash flow problem. i dont need to fill an arena with 1000 watts or anything crazy like that, just something to fill larger rooms and the occasional theatre, some outside stuff. i was looking for something with 350-500 watts and relatively inexpensive with good tone. Seemed like a used SWR 350 was right, maybe im wrong. any suggestions would be good. i have about $500 for the head.

    Hi, Tom -

    A lot of people who turn their nose up at high-powered amplifiers don't know what they're missing.

    A 350w amp with an efficient cabinet will be louder than a 1000w amp with an inefficient one - the difference between 350w and 1000w is a little more than 4db.

    Let's take two cabinets - one 2x10 and one 4x10 with identical drivers. You're using the 4x10 with 350 watts.

    If you were playing the 2x10 you'd need 700 watts to get the same volume as the 4x10 and 1000 watts would be <1.5db more than that.

    Since you're using dissimilar cabinets the bass coupling effect isn't nearly as dramatic as it would be if all the drivers were identical - and IME a 4x10 cabinet is a heck of a lot louder than a 2x10 + 1x15 driven by the same amp.

    I understand cost is a factor - is it possible to go with what you've got until you can save up enough to get what you want instead of what you can afford now? It's cheaper in the long run to buy what you want in the end rather than upgrade through a succession of amps.
     
  9. primusdude said...

    That's the popular way to see it, but personally I don't think that is good reasoning, because the power sections of different amps have different levels of gain, and it's not always proportional to how beefy the power supply is. The volume knobs are just simple attenuators, after all, even if they go to 11.

    I think you took me a bit too literally, primusdude. For me it's all about headroom - let's say you're playing fingerstyle in front of an audience and cruising along using say, 100w of your amp.

    Here comes the bass solo - the band stops playing and you go into wanker mode with the bass. That popped G string can easily require several hundred watts more to reproduce accurately. So - if your amp has the headroom you get clean tone. If not the signal gets clipped.

    I don't play any louder than other people I know - but I am a fanatic about clean tone.
     
  10. Matthias

    Matthias

    May 30, 2000
    Vienna, Austria
    I think this refers to the proper setting of the preamp gain to get best overall signal to noise ratio.
    And this IS a good idea.
    If you turn up the gain too high clipping (->distortion) will occur.
    If you turn up the gain lower than necessary you get more noise (hiss) than necessary.

    BTW my only experience with a SWR 350 was in a store where I played it through a 115+210 stack (SWR Pro) - I was disappointed because it was not loud at all and the power amp clip light came up even at moderate volume levels.

    Matthias