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Drum n' Bass

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by Bassline_Delux, Jul 7, 2004.


  1. I'm gonna be playing some stuff for a friend of mine, a drum and bass DJ and creator. I'm not quite sure if this fits into the technique forum, but correct me if I'm wrong.

    Anyway, I was wondering if you have any tips or ideas? (I know this is vague as hell, but I've never really done anything ike this before.)
     
  2. Hmmm, strange I saw this, as I'm listening to dnb right now. Anyways, a friend of mine makes some dnb tracks and he uses his bass. He does run it through a lot of effects, but that also depends on what style of dnb you'll be playing along with. Most dnb follows a structure of 8/4 going pretty fast. Sometimes the snares are staggered so it could make it a little harder to play along with if you zone in on them too much. Its kind of hard to give tips, I'd say just listen to different dnb tracks, and try and play along with them. Then you can get a feel for the style of dnb. It might be easier to subdivide the song when you're keeping beat in your head so it won't be going as fast. Really just depends on you're preference. I personally like the really wicked and distorted basslines in dnb.
     
  3. Aaron Saunders

    Aaron Saunders

    Apr 27, 2002
    Ontario
    I've heard this discussed before in the effects forum because I almost got in a DnB thing with a friend of mine, and I was advised on (generally) the following: Drums are generally pretty fast, but the big mess in DnB is when the bassist tries to keep up with the drummer -- it just sounds messy that way. It seems to be pretty advisable to let those drums go fast, and play at the equivalent of half tempo (or same tempo, just playing quarter or even half notes). Maybe play a little bit slower, and behind the beat.

    Best way to practice DnB? Get a drum machine! A lot of bassists in DnB use two methods to fill up all the sonic space -- either a HUGE, fat tone that fills the room, various effects, or both. I'd suggest getting a Digitech BP50, BP200, or a Zoom 708II pedal. All of them are great quality, good effects and good customization, and they all have pretty good drum machines. The Digitech BP50 is the cheapest (around $130 Canadian). The main (and to my knowledge, only) difference between it and the BP200 is that the BP200 has an expression pedal for controlling whammy and volume functions. The Zoom 708II is the most expensive of the lot, and definitely the best. I've played through it on a few occasions, great pedal. I have the BP50, defintely worth the cash, but if you can afford it, spring for the Zoom (about $300 Canadian).