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Dye then shellac then Tru-Oil?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Schizoid75, Jul 7, 2005.


  1. Schizoid75

    Schizoid75

    Apr 27, 2005
    Columbus, OH
    That's what I've heard. So how about it? I've read that a hand rubbed aniline dye straight into bare wood may not be completely colorfast. Does it depend on whether the dye is oil or water based? I've got a water based aniline dye I'm hoping to use. I guess the other option is dye, Tru-Oil, then shellac. Pros/cons for each method? Success stories? Horrible failures? Please let me know before I sink any more time into this project!!

    In case anyone wants the complete details before commenting . . .
    hard maple body (not flamed, quilted, etc.)
    violet water-based aniline dye powder
    Zinsser Bulls-Eye wipe on shellac
    1 bottle of Tru-Oil
    1 bottle of Tru-Oil sealer
    large quantities of elbow grease also available . . .
     
  2. ESP-LTD

    ESP-LTD

    Sep 9, 2001
    Idaho
    I've used Tru Oil a few times and been happy with it. What function would the shellac perform?
     
  3. Schizoid75

    Schizoid75

    Apr 27, 2005
    Columbus, OH
    I'd read a few comments that dye with tru-oil straight on top might not be completely colorfast. The idea was that the shellac would protect the dye and ensure that the color stayed on the bass, not on me. Of course, the thing I keep thinking of is how will the Tru-Oil sink in if there's shellac on top. Like I said, it's just what I'd heard in the past, so any opinions would be appreciated.
     
  4. The shellac, in my process, is used as a pore filler and would go on before any dye steps take place. You are correct - a fully shellac'ed surface wouldn't be able to take any oil
     
  5. ESP-LTD

    ESP-LTD

    Sep 9, 2001
    Idaho
    For gun stocks with TruOil one of the old recipe's is 'spar varnish' thinned down 50% or more as a sealer for the grain.

    Although TruOil won't 'soak in' after a sealer, it works like a varnish and will dutifully pile up on top as thick as you want (although I think thin coats are nicer unless you want gloss).

    Here are nice links about TruOil-

    TruOil

    TruOil

    It's been a few years since I used it but I used to use it a lot. I used 0000 steel wool between coats and applied the coats with fingers, polishing it in as I went.