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Ear training anyone

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by fretbuzz, Sep 7, 2001.


  1. can anyone suggest ways to improve ear training? i've seen significant improvement in myself just from normal practice. im sure everyone has read advertisments about ear training programs etc... is that stuff just snake oil or is there anything out there that works? thanks
     
  2. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    There's some good info and software available

    http://www.google.com/search?q=ear+training&hl=de&lr=

    I doubt those 'perfect pitch' course are really worth your money.
    You don't need perfect pitch anyway.

    Ear training can also include learning and transcribing songs from records, it may even the best and most rewarding way to do it.
     
  3. OK,

    1. Can you read music?

    2. Do you have a keyboard?

    3. Seen the Sound of Music?

    Good. Your bass will work if you don't have a keyboard, but the keys might be easier for starters.

    First, write out a c major scale on some staff paper (clef of your choice) and then play it on the keyboard. Here's where the Sound of Music comes in. Assign each note of the scale a syllable so C D E F G A B C becomes:

    DO RE MI FA SO LA TI DO.

    Now, for the very beginner it may be easier to start with the pentatonic scale. take out the half steps (the F and the B), and write this scale on your staff paper. You now have DO RE MI SO LA DO.

    Play these notes on the keyboard and sing the syllables. Always read the music as you go. Start slow. Half notes or quarters, whatever's comfortable.

    Good. Now, for various exercises.
    Start with the first 4 notes, C D E G. and sing up and down DO RE MI SO MI RE DO. Work on this for a bit to get comfortable with the technique.

    Play and sing intervals:
    major 2nd: DO RE DO
    Major 3rd: DO MI DO
    Perfect 5th: DO SO DO
    etc.

    Once you're ready to add in your half steps, you can move on to arpeggios. Start with this pattern, 3 notes, up and down, starting with C D E D C, then move up to D and do the next 3 D E F E D, and so on:

    DO RE MI RE DO
    RE MI FA MI RE
    MI FA SO FA MI
    FA SO LA SO FA
    SO LA TI LA SO
    LA TI DO TI LA

    then go back down

    SO LA TI LA SO
    etc.

    Once you've mastered that move on to arpeggios:

    DO MI SO MI DO
    RE FA LA FA RE
    MI SO TI SO MI
    FA LA DO LA FA

    And 4 note groups:

    DO MI SO TI SO MI DO
    RE FA LA DO LA FA ME
    etc.

    Remember, always be reading the notes as you practice these exercises. With enough practice you'll be able to hear and recognize intervals and patterns.

    The next step is to get some simple music to sing to using the syllables. Since I'm only doing the major scale here, something like a beginner piano or organ book will do. Stuff like Three Blind Mice, Over The Rainbow etc. Play the piece and sing along.

    When you've practiced all this, the next step is to start sight-singing it all. Go back to the first exercises. Play the low C on the keyboard and ONLY SING the rest. Eventually move on to the easy songs doing the same thing.

    The point of all this? To develop your ears, of course. You'll start to recognize scales, intervals and patterns. When you hear your doorbell you'll know what interval it is! More importantly, your ability to hear chord changes will improve, which will improve your response time in playing situations. In addition you'll have unknowingly improved your reading skills!

    So remember, always write out in standard notation what you're going to sing. Start out slow.

    This is just the tip of the iceberg for ear training, but it's a lot of work that will really get you going if you put the time in.

    Lastly, don't be afraid to sing! Don't worry about sounding like a doofus singing DO RE MI. You might destroy your family's ears, but you're improving your own. :)


    PS this is all from memory here, so if I butchered anything, left things out or if there's anything to add to/subtract from it, please feel free to correct it! :)
     
  4. great suggestions btw stingray5... aside from what has been said here already, i would suggest listening to types of music that you don't normally listen to if you're into rock such as jazz, classical, etc. try to transcribe solos, or at least pick the notes out on your instrument if you can't read music. it will all come eventually.
     
  5. THANK YOU STINGRAY5, THAT SOUNDS LIKE GREAT (AND INEXPENSIVE) ADVISE.
     
  6. You don't need that David Lucas Burge (I think that's his name) course. I got it, but after going through all the free courses, I felt absolutely NO change in how I heard the notes. The little "trick" was to listen to the colors of the notes. It basicly is... well, hard to explain. I never got it.
     
  7. Dave Castelo

    Dave Castelo

    Apr 19, 2000
    Mexico
    Down here it´s:

    C D E F G A B

    Do Re Mi Fa SOL La SI
     
  8. Real nice job stingray.
    The paste: Dave Berg or what ever is the friggin Anthony Robbins of ear training.

    Lots of fluff but more bull.
     
  9. elbass

    elbass

    Aug 6, 2001
    San Antonio TX
    Check out Gary Willis' book w/CD Ultimate Ear Training for Guitar and Bass published by Hal Leonard. The cool part of this method is he applies the ear training to the fingerboard. Also check out his website at www.garywillis.com for a taste of his approach-I think you can also order the book there.
     
  10. Huh? :) Who's Anthony Robbins?
     
  11. You don't know who Tony Robbins is? He is a motivational speaker. Tells people how they can be their best at anything. Do a search on him. He used to be on TV a lot.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. elbass

    elbass

    Aug 6, 2001
    San Antonio TX


    Now I think he's living in a van down by the river...:) (Chris Farley, RIP)