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early 60's fender jazz slab board ???? fender guru

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by jonb9, Oct 26, 2004.


  1. jonb9

    jonb9

    Sep 13, 2004
    Ok i've been searching for a fender jazz bass in olympic white for awhile now, and I found one today--it was being cleaned up and had the electronics out of it. He said it has a slab cut or slab board. I dont really know what that is--The earliest jazz I've played prior was a 65. So, is a slab cut/board a good thing or no?(i think it's something with the fret board.?), What is a fair askin price ( it's beat on ) ? I'm a player not a collector is this bass something that guys still play out or is it really mainly a collectors piece, and hard to adjust? It was awesome tho lreally ballsy looked like it had been through a lot.

    ANy advice would be appreciated. thank you very much--Hey I know I seem clueless but I'm of the younger generation here---Us young players got to keep the vintage vibe rolling---teach me and i will pass along the knowledge to the next!thanks guys, Jon
     
  2. I was under the impression that a "slab cut" meant that the body was a slab of wood, that it did not have a beer belly cut out on the back.

    I know that G&L used to make there basses like this back in the day, and that they are pretty good collectors basses.




    joe
     
  3. Slab bodies only apply to pre-1954/1956 P Basses (can't remember the specific year, one of those two). Jazz basses have never had slab bodies.

    Slab boards are fingerboards with a flat bottom. That is, they're fatter in the middle than on the edges. They're supposed to have a favorable tone to the veneer ones of post-1963 until about 1980. Veneer ones curve with the radius of the neck and maintain the same width throughout, meaning they are thinner than the slabs. Slab boards are usually more desirable and fetch more on the collector's market, but I can't really attest to the tonal difference. I'm guessing the slab is bassier while the veneer is thinner sounding, which isn't necessarily a bad thing. Either way, you're probably looking at a lot of money for that bass if it's in original or near original condition. Then again, a refinish and you can get a good deal on it.

    Oh, and that bass is likely killer in the studio. I wouldn't play it live, though. Make sure the pickups are still alive, the truss rod isn't maxed, and the neck has no warpings. Check it thoroughly and make sure nothing serious is wrong with it. Rust and dents are to be expected, but missing and broken parts aren't.
     
  4. Thanks for explaning the difference, Jenderfazz. Learn something new every day. :)




    joe
     
  5. jonb9

    jonb9

    Sep 13, 2004
    Your the man thank you for your time it means alot, but if I get it--I just have to play it live!!!!
     
  6. If you do so, take care of it! I'd hate to lose it or have it stolen!
     
  7. Dude

    Dude Commercial User

    Mar 19, 2000
    AZ
    Owner: The Dude Pit Forum (closed) Producer: School of Bass
    Here's a photo of a very early "Veneer" board.
     
  8. Dude

    Dude Commercial User

    Mar 19, 2000
    AZ
    Owner: The Dude Pit Forum (closed) Producer: School of Bass
    Here's a photo of a "slab" board.
     
  9. jonb9

    jonb9

    Sep 13, 2004
    Thanks jenderfazz and Dude Very nice of you. I'm learning