Early Fender Jazz Design

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Barnacle Joe, Aug 2, 2004.

  1. Hi, I read somewhere recently that the early jazz basses had "felt tipped string mutes", I was curious, what exactly is that (ie where would they be? I've seen little felt covers put on guitar strings on the bridge end to prevent breakage, same thing or something entirely different. Also, how would one describe the sound produced with "felt tipped string mutes"?
  2. Jazzin'

    Jazzin' ...Bluesin' and Funkin'

    they are under the bridge cover right between the bridge pickup and the bridge.
  3. The old Jazz Basses (and P-Basses, for that matter) had the string mutes in the "ashtray" that covered the bridge. They make the bass go, "thump" rather than "twang." In those days (early 60's) people were looking to emulate the sound of an upright bass, or at least Fender thought that's what people were trying to do.
  4. Fender had the wrong idea about bassists for years, but that's for another thread. To reference where the mutes would go: The four holes in Jaco's bass and in his relic'ed sig model are not from 'a previous pickup' as some say, but from the removal of these mutes.
  5. Jazzin'

    Jazzin' ...Bluesin' and Funkin'

    yeah, how can someone even think that it was from a pickup? its CLEARLY from the mutes.