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ears ears ears

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by No_Fingures, Feb 17, 2003.


  1. No_Fingures

    No_Fingures

    Jun 17, 2002
    Boston Ma
    Ok i have been trying to train my ests for the last 6 mouths...I have been on good-ear.com for a while. I have been stuck on the up /down intervals thing for a while i am getttin like only between half and 2/3rds right. its gettin really frustrating and does not seem to be working. i was wonderin if any of you can give me some tips on training those ears so that they will be able to transcribe solos and stuff.

    SHould i just say screw all this intervals and traing anf go straight for the transcribing and see where that goes?
     
  2. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    There have been some good threads here in the past for ear-training. I do recommend a search and you'll come up with some great information.

    Intervals are an excellent way to begin the development of your ear. After that, moving on to triads is the way to go. You want to be able to distinguish the difference between major, minor, augmented, and diminished. If you have a friend that plays piano, have him/her help you. It's the way to go.

    Definitely start on songs as soon as you can. It's definitely going to help you. I cannot stress enough the wonderful world of the blues. So much of popular music is built around the I chord, the IV chord, and the V chord. That's all the blues is. The excellent thing about the blues is that you'll know the basic chord structure, I-IV-V. (Are you familiar with 12-bar blues?? If not, check out next post). What you'll be doing in studying blues, is helping your ear to not only hear the individual notes, but to hear chord progressions as well, which is even more important, in my opinion, than hearing individual notes.
     
  3. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    FYI: Your basic 12 bar blues.

    The most important thing is really knowing the key. With the blues, there are many different rhythms, (i.e. swing, shuffle, etc.), and those are things you want to be able to discern as well. Things like quick turnarounds, stops, vamps, and outros are also things to add to your vocabulary, but for now, the blues work like so:

    / I / I / I / I /
    / IV / IV / I / I /
    / V / IV / I / I /

    That's your basic pattern. The roman numerals refer to the chord for that bar. The I chord being the tonic. If you need any help with scale information, click me!.

    Knowing this basic structure, almost helps you "cheat" with you ear-training. You already know where the song is going next.

    One thing to remember about these chords, is that they're often not all major chords, like what would occur naturally in the scale. They are usually dominant chords, meaning that they have lowered 7ths.

    Does this make sense?
     
  4. No_Fingures

    No_Fingures

    Jun 17, 2002
    Boston Ma
    yeh 1,4,5 and 2,5,1, and the 1,6,2,5. the differant chords types and the subsittute chors with switchen the third and 7th. I am beginging to study jazz (overwelming). i really shoud play with more of my records