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Easiest gloss finish for wood knobs?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by fourstringbliss, Dec 7, 2011.


  1. fourstringbliss

    fourstringbliss Supporting Member

    Oct 5, 2003
    Puyallup, WA
    I bought a used Audere preamp and it comes with custom made wooden concentric knobs pictured below:

    DSC_0393.

    My bass has a polyurethane gloss finish but it looks like the knobs are either unfinished or are finished in oil or a satin finish of some sort. They are rosewood and spalted maple. What would be an easy (and durable) gloss finish to apply to them? How would you apply it?

    Thanks!
     
  2. __HM__

    __HM__

    Aug 28, 2008
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    First thing that comes to mind is poly.. Lots n lots of poly.
     
  3. fourstringbliss

    fourstringbliss Supporting Member

    Oct 5, 2003
    Puyallup, WA
    In a spray can? Would I need to sand in between coats?
     
  4. mikeyswood

    mikeyswood Banned

    Jul 22, 2007
    Cincinnati OH
    Luthier of Michael Wayne Instruments
    Epoxy.
     
  5. fourstringbliss

    fourstringbliss Supporting Member

    Oct 5, 2003
    Puyallup, WA
    How would I apply that?
     
  6. Musiclogic

    Musiclogic Commercial User

    Aug 6, 2005
    Southwest Michigan
    Owner/Builder: HJC Customs USA, The Cool Lute, C G O
    Polyurethane is great, but you would have to wetsand to develop a glass like gloss, if you just want the common "I shot it with a spray can" look, do 3 or 4 coats and call it good. Epoxy is a different animal all together, it's very expensive for a product like system 3 "Mirror Coat", for doing knobs, this would be mixed in a very small amount and brushed on so that the rosewood grain would fill a bit, then let dry overnight. The simplest finish would be a wipe on poly urethane, which is as it implies, a wiped on finish. The real question is how much gloss do you want, and how much work are you willing to put in and over how much time. Good finishes are not something you do overnight, and call it good.
     
  7. Dirk Diggler

    Dirk Diggler Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Anytown USA
    I'd vote poly as well, yes you always sand between coats.
    Cheers,
    Dirk
     
  8. HaMMerHeD

    HaMMerHeD Supporting Member

    May 20, 2005
    Norman, OK, USA
    I'd go with spray shellac, with some very light sanding every few coats.
     
  9. fourstringbliss

    fourstringbliss Supporting Member

    Oct 5, 2003
    Puyallup, WA
    Would buffing with #000 steel wool work for sanding? It's just to smooth out any imperfections, right? The next coat would make things clear again.
     
  10. Dirk Diggler

    Dirk Diggler Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Anytown USA
    Sure it's the same idea, but just remember to keep the steel wool away from your pickups. ;)
    Dirk
     
  11. PazzoBasso

    PazzoBasso

    Jan 21, 2011
    YYZ
    I've heard rosewood can be tricky to finish. It might need some prepping to eliminate some of its natural oils - or a finish that's compatible with the oil present in real rosewood. I know it's been done (like RIC fretboards), but there might be a trick to it.
     
  12. HaMMerHeD

    HaMMerHeD Supporting Member

    May 20, 2005
    Norman, OK, USA
    If you are trying to finish an oily wood, cleaning the surface with acetone just prior to finishing should allow the finish product some purchase.
     

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