1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

EB Slinky Cobalt Flats 40 - 95 on a Short Scale Bass???

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by Christcr, Dec 13, 2018.


  1. Christcr

    Christcr Supporting Member

    Feb 8, 2015
    Utah
    I have been using either 45-100 or 45-105 EB Slinky Cobalt Flats on some of my short scale basses. On the others, I (right now) have Fender 5250 40-95 short scale rounds (besides my JMJ Mustang, which has the stock Fender flats). Obviously there is a huge tension/stiffness difference when switching back and forth.

    Have any of you strung a short scale bass with 40-95 EB Slinky Cobalt Flats? Or would that be even floppier than 40-95 rounds? They do seem to have less tension, but I've never tried that lightest gauge on a short scale. I'm just looking to get the "feel" closer on the tension, but I don't want to go to another brand of string. The choice is either keep running 45-100 Cobalt Flats or switch to 40-95 Cobalt flats (and I'm happy with the 40-95 Fender rounds).

    Thoughts or experiences?
     
  2. GIBrat51

    GIBrat51 Innocent as the day is long Supporting Member

    Mar 5, 2013
    Lost Wages, Nevada
    Personally, I've never had much luck with lighter gauge strings on short scale basses. Some people have, though, and seem to like them a lot. But, they've always felt... not floppy, exactly; more like tightly pulled rubber bands... to me. I prefer at least 45-100s - rounds or flats - on all my shortys. That way, they feel like the majority of my basses, which are 34" scale...:cool:
     
  3. Christcr

    Christcr Supporting Member

    Feb 8, 2015
    Utah
    I've been running 45-100 or heavier on my short scale basses for a long, long time. I recently got the new Fender American Performer Mustang which is strung with 40-95, and I'm not sure why (because, like you, I've always found 40-95s on short scale too... "loose"), but these feel great. So, I've been thinking about giving the light gauge flats a try on other Mustangs. But, the tension is already pretty light compared to any flat and most rounds. I'm thinking they will definitely be even "floppier." Maybe. I guess the only way to know for sure is to just grab a set and be experimental.
     
  4. D'Addario makes a set of Chromes in short scale. They show absolutely no floppiness at all. Very taught. I used them for a while, but they were too taught for me, so I down tuned them in DGCF. Still very tight. You may want to give them a try.
     
  5. Christcr

    Christcr Supporting Member

    Feb 8, 2015
    Utah
    The big problem (for me) is that I really do not like the sound of flats, in general. Cobalt flats really do have a totally different voicing than the rest--not exactly a roundwound sound, but not the typical flatwound sound either. Every set of flats I've tried (pretty much all of them) have way too much of a low-mid "honk" to them that I just don't like at all. Chromes are brighter than the typical flatwound, but they still do have that "honk." Other than the cobalts, the only other set I've used that has less "honk" would be Fender flats. Unfortunately, they aren't made in a lighter gauge.
     
  6. J-Mags

    J-Mags Supporting Member

    Jun 18, 2018
    Durham NC
    .

    I've used Dunlop flats with a 40 G (a little thin, but not terrible), and GHS flats with a 95 E (fine) on short scale. I think they'd be fine if you like thin strings. If 45-100 feels too thick for you, try it out 40-96. I'd expect a slightly floppy short-scale feel, but nothing you couldn't deal with if that's what you like.
     
  7. J0hn

    J0hn

    Nov 12, 2016
    Maryland
    What exactly is it about these strings that people like so much? I tried the 90-40 and I don't know if it's just the guage but the sound was so wimpy. Their sound on my jazz sounds like when I'm accidentally playing at 20% gain with roundwounds.
     
  8. Christcr

    Christcr Supporting Member

    Feb 8, 2015
    Utah
    This first paragraph applies only to short scale:

    I find (or at least my ears find) that heavier gauge strings tend to get "warbly" on the pitch. It's not bad up to about 45-105, but anything heavier than that on my short scales and it just doesn't give me the sharp attack, tighter response, and pitch definition that I like. The thing I like about the lighter strings as far as sound (because yes, they do get floppy and need to be played with a very light touch) is that even though the output is less, the pitches I hear are more distinct. I know it's probably just the way I hear things and nobody in the audience will ever know the difference, but something about the "clarity" of lighter gauge strings outweighs the lower output level and other disadvantages. They are also easier to intonate precisely (as in adjusting the bridge saddles).

    To be fair, this used to happen with me when I primarily played long scale basses as well--I generally ran 35-90 strings on them. Again, something to do with the way my ears perceive the pitches of the notes. I honestly don't know what to call it--the note definition and pitch is just "sharper" or "less cluttered" even though the output is lower and less varied on change of attack/technique.

    Same thing seems to apply to my upright bass. Always run light gauge strings on it. Of course, as poorly as I play it, I may not want to even hear the pitches that are coming out of that thing! :smug:
     
  9. J0hn

    J0hn

    Nov 12, 2016
    Maryland
    It's not the gauge. I prefer light gauge strings also. The typical tone from a good set of flats just doesn't seem to be there for me with the EB Cobalts. Maybe it's just me.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.