effects on leaving bass in damp garage???

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by xcental34x, Mar 16, 2004.

  1. xcental34x


    Feb 28, 2003
    Memphrica, TN
    My bands guitarist and I cleaned out my garage the other day, so we would have a practice space. Well, I decided to drag my amp and bass down there and leave them. Turns out the Dryer vent ends in my garage. I picked up my bass to play it a minute ago and the neck was damp. This kind of worries me. Do I have anything to worry about? What are the effects? Will it hurt the amp if I leave it down there?

  2. Skerik1


    Sep 21, 2002
    Saint Paul, MN
    I left my bass in the trunk of my car overnight, and the fingerboard split off the neck. The same might happen to you if you don't keep that thing indoors!!

    Luckily, my bass was under warrantee, and they replaced the whole bass free of charge! (thanks Spector!).

  3. atldeadhead


    Jun 17, 2002
    Damp environments aren't to good for wooden instruments and electronics. The condensation inside your amp could definitely have ill effects on the electronics and your bass neck may need an adjustment if you leave it in the garage long enough. If it's that damp in the garage I would advise against leaving your gear in there on a permanent basis.
  4. Adam Barkley

    Adam Barkley Mayday!

    Aug 26, 2003
    Jackson, MS

    Also my dad and I are going to build a practice room in the attic of our garage. It will be air-conditioned, do I need to bring my bass into the house after playing out there, or will it be ok to leave it. Amp?
  5. xcental34x


    Feb 28, 2003
    Memphrica, TN
    OK. The bass is out of the garage.

    But I'm torn on wether I should bring my amp out. Its too much work to bring it back upstairs. Will it be ok if I cover it with a blanket or something? Thats what I've had over it the past couple of days.

  6. Eyescream


    Feb 4, 2004
    Knoxville, TN
    Moisture is bad for electronics as it is for wood. If you can't move it every night, try to find something like a plastic throw-cover that you could put over the amp and cabinet(s). That might help.
  7. luknfur


    Jan 14, 2004
    In Vermont people have a summer and winter car. The winter car you can literally see through cause of the salt they throw on the roads. You're gears going to look a lot like that but won't function near so well.
  8. Tim Cole

    Tim Cole

    Jun 12, 2002
    Findlay, Ohio
    Actually plastic draws moisture. I say either stop being lazy, or live with the consequences.
  9. Eyescream


    Feb 4, 2004
    Knoxville, TN
    Well, in that case, I withdraw my suggestion.

    In some confusion, I must say. I seem to remember seeing plastic covers for Stanford Research phase amplifiers we used at the place I used to work for. Figured they were kind of an all-purpose dust/moisture cover.
  10. Nomad


    Mar 9, 2004
    Northern Virginia
    Good idea, thinking the same thing.

    But the amount of moisture your describing, it may take two of them. Let it dehumidify and you might be safe.
  11. xcental34x


    Feb 28, 2003
    Memphrica, TN
    How much do dehumidifiers run?

    I've discovered that it really only gets moist when I use the dryer. When its off. Its fine.

  12. HeavyDuty

    HeavyDuty Supporting Curmudgeon Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Jun 26, 2000
    Suburban Chicago, IL
    I'm thinking it's a *really bad thing* to have your dryer vent into an enclosed space. It can't be good for the structure of the house, and if it's a gas dryer, there's CO issues, too.

    Do you feel particularly stupid when you're out there with the dryer running? ;)
  13. xcental34x


    Feb 28, 2003
    Memphrica, TN
    Its not a gas dryer. I was thinking though I wouldn't have to worry about the moisture if there was an open space in the garage, such as a window, or slightly open door. Surely the condensation would be forced out because of the lack of pressure.

    Uhm... no? What provoked that question.
  14. Finger Blister

    Finger Blister

    Jul 8, 2003
    It's bad, bad, bad.
    My bathroom vent just went into the attic.
    It warped the hell out of my roof.
    Cost $4,000 to replace.
    (and got a roof vent for the bathroom exhaust.)

    If you own the place, re-route the dryer vent to the exterior.
    Vents exiting into the garage is just plain stupid.
    It'll eventually wipe out sheetrock, plywood, even 2x4's.

    Even using a dehumidifier won't help, unless the vent is

    Think about it.
    Huge amounts of moisture is dumped into a confined space
    all at once.
    It will take the dehumidifier about 4 hours to remove the moisture from one load.
    In the mean time, the enviroment is changing from extreme
    humidity to a dry one.
    That might even be as bad or worse then not having one at all.

    The only thing you can do is route the vent to the exterior
    AND use a dehumidifer.

    If you have extreme temp.'s is another issue.
    Cold and warmth changes cause condensation.

    BTW: Dehumidifier's use a lot of electricity.

    Run the vent to the window.
    Have vent on one side and block off the rest.
    Make sure window is secure.
    (board from the top of the window to the top sill)
    Wouldn't want a thief opportunity.
  15. McHack


    Jul 29, 2003
    Central Ohio!
    You can get a decent one at your local Home Depot, for around $100. What a dehumidifier does is, suck the moisture out of the air...it then has to do SOMETHING w/ the water. Most dehumidifers have a collection bucket, and/or a hose outlet. You'll have to check the bucket every day, or else it'll shut off. Unless you run a hose from the unit, to someplace outside, or into a sump pump or something like that.