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Electronic projects for musicians...

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Blackbird, Oct 27, 2001.


  1. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    I know there's a book out there with that title, but I was wondering if any of you TBers who are handy with electronics have any simple projects that can be undertaken by people who want to get into doing their own wiring, like making our own volume pedal, A/B switch or something like that. C'mon, own up.
     
  2. I'd like to know too, I would really like to make my own envelope filter or my own pickup.
     
  3. Brendan

    Brendan

    Jun 18, 2000
    Austin, TX
    I'd like to make my own Effects pedals, Pre-amps (offboard), and maybe Pups. If only I took the time to learn how.
     
  4. MikeyD

    MikeyD

    Sep 9, 2000
    I think this question was posed awhile back (spring or summer), and someone posted this URL for guitar-related electronics projects: http://tinpan.fortunecity.com/solidgold/29/jdsdiy.html.

    You can also try getting some project books from Radio Shack and read Popular Electronics, etc. It's really not a bad hobby for an electric bass player to take up!

    - Mike
     
  5. BenF

    BenF

    Mar 29, 2001
    Boston area
    http://www.geofex.com/

    The site's got schematics, circuit diagrams/PCB layouts, effects FAQ, etc.. I'm to much of a klutz to try this stuff, but it might help someone else.
     
  6. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    Yeah I need to do some of this too because the active electronics on my custom jazz no longer work and I can only play the bass passive. I think I have a short or something but have been really to busy currently to investigate what the problem is.
     
  7. Paul A

    Paul A

    Dec 13, 1999
    Hertfordshire U.K!
    Hi,
    I make loads of stuff (Including valve amps and pre amps, fx pedals etc)
    I've just finished fixing a VOX AC30 for John Turnbull (The Blockheads - Ian Dury's old band).
    So if anyone wants help or circuit diagrams (sorry ..."Schematics" for most of you!) let me know.
     
  8. On some sort of a side note....
    Right now I am thinking about colleges, and I this is the stuff I love. Working with the electronics, and learning how to build some of this stuff myself. I am interested in doing it musically as a profession, so does anyone know what kind of degree that requires? I have been thinking about majoring in Electrical Engineering, but I am not sure if that is exactly what I want. If someone could help point me in the right path, I would be most appreciative.
     
  9. Gman

    Gman

    Jan 4, 2000
    Indianapolis, IN
    I'd love to have plans for a good bass distortion pedal, if you can do that.

    Thanks,
    Dave
     
  10. MikeyD

    MikeyD

    Sep 9, 2000
    Electrical engineering is a very tough subject - typically one of the very hardest majors at a typical university. If you are good at math and pretty bright technically, then you might do well, and I encourage you. There are reasons why it is so hard, but when you graduate from an accredited program, you really know something significant. On the other hand, if you are more of an average student and like hands-on applications more, then a technical school degree, such as an associate or bachelor in electronic technology, might be more suitable. But your career potential and future growth are much greater with a BSEE; if you follow up with an MSEE, it is far greater, IMO.

    EE is more related to designing and analyzing electrical and electronic things. Building such things doesn't require such mastery of mathematics and physics, though.

    Anyway, I'm all for people pushing themselves hard for awhile - there are big rewards in it, but you have to be willing to sacrifice: it is not easy. I hope this helps a bit.

    - Mike
     
  11. Paul A

    Paul A

    Dec 13, 1999
    Hertfordshire U.K!
    Hi,
    Here's the original circuit for the "FuzzFace".
    This works great for Bass if you increase the value of C1 to 4.7 Uf.
     
  12. Paul A

    Paul A

    Dec 13, 1999
    Hertfordshire U.K!
    And here's the layout .....
     
  13. Gman

    Gman

    Jan 4, 2000
    Indianapolis, IN
    Thanks Paul !

    These drawings are far better than most that I've found. Looks like a simple circuit. I'll try it.

    Dave
     
  14. Thanks a lot Mikey, but my dad is the real academic type, and he would not allow me to go to anything other than an accredited college. I do fairly well in school I have about a 3.0 and I have great grades in science and math, so I am hoping to get into a good school.
     
  15. MikeyD

    MikeyD

    Sep 9, 2000
    You're welcome. Then I'd say you might seriously consider EE as a major. Just go into it with the proper expectations: it is definitely not basket-weaving! ;) You have to work very, very hard, and it can take a serious toll on your social life. As I said, though, there are rewards, and one can always choose to lay back (relax) later after the grind is through. Good luck!
    - Mike
    P.S.: With your interest in music, you might want to find a program that has some decent acoustics courses as well.
     
  16. Thanks, you know of any?
     
  17. MikeyD

    MikeyD

    Sep 9, 2000
    In your neck of the woods, you might check out Penn State. Last I knew, it had one of the best acoustics programs in the country - including graduate studies.

    You could also check out Univ. of Hartford (in Conn.), which also has an acoustics program. See http://uhavax.hartford.edu/acoustics/. I'm sure there are a few others around as well. The Acoustical Society of America (http://asa.aip.org/) or Audio Engineering Society (http://www.aes.org/) probably also have good resources. The latter occasionally publishes listings of colleges that have audio and acoustics studies.

    - Mike
     
  18. Hey PLehmer,

    I'm currently doing an EE degree. I've been a pro sound engineer/tech for the last 10 years and I decided that I have to get out of that end of the music business. Eventually I'd like to get a job at one of the big pro audio companies (QSC, Meyer, Soundcraft, etc) as a designer. There are many many oppurtunities for Electrical Engineers. But...(there's always a but, isn't there....) The work load is incredible (see my signature). I spend about 70 hrs a week on school work and I don't have much of a social life. I hadn't done any math in like 8 years so I may have had to work a bit harder... The torture will be worth it, that's sometimes the only thing that keeps me going. Actually it's not that bad. You just have to put your head down and do the work.... My school alternates 4 month academic terms with 4 month (paid) co-op work terms. So that makes it more tolerable. When looking for a school, I'd strongly suggest going to one with a co-op program. The work experience gained on co-op terms is very valuable and is also a good way to make contact with future employers. Even with the workload, I'd encourage you to do it! Good luck.
     
  19. Player

    Player

    Dec 27, 1999
    USA Cincinnati, OH
    Hey Paul, How about a 3 band eq (on board)/preamp. Got anything?
     
  20. Paul A

    Paul A

    Dec 13, 1999
    Hertfordshire U.K!
    Hi,
    Yep, I've used a module from "Telecontrolli" called an SP1.
    This is small enough to fit anywhere.
    You get 3 band eq, Bright/Deep selection and Hi/Lo input.
    It's a 15 pin Inline package.
    Couple of tips:
    Use a 15 pin inline socket and solder everything to that BEFORE inserting the module (It's static sensitive until it's in circuit)
    Use 18 volts (2x9 volt batteries in series).

    They are available from Maplin in the U.K. (www.maplin.co.uk)

    Here's a link - unfortunately in french but you'll get the idea:
    http://www.lextronic.fr/Hybrides/433/Telecontrolli/autres/pre-guitare.htm

    :) :)