Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

Electronic Tuners

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [DB]' started by Jeff Bollbach, Feb 21, 2004.


  1. Jeff Bollbach

    Jeff Bollbach Jeff Bollbach Luthier, Inc.

    Dec 12, 2001
    freeport, ny
    Hi Guys-
    Did a search for this[Ineed one] and had no luck. I'm sure it's been discussed before[sorry for the Dept. of Redundancy Department]. Can anyone recommend one? Someone wants me to do some pearl inlay markers so I wanna get it right!
     
  2. Chasarms

    Chasarms Casual Observer

    May 24, 2001
    Bettendorf, IA USA
    In todays world, I think most all of the little electronic ones work pretty well.

    My teacher has the same little black Korg that all hail BG sells on his site. It's nice in that it also generates a tone. CA30 or GA30, something like that. It is less than $20 about anywhere.

    I use one with the same guts but doesn't do the tone. It works really well. I even use it to set intonation on guitars and basses. It works really well for that also. They are fast and accurate and cost about $13 or so. Another nice thing about the one my teacher uses is that it is chromatic and has auto note recognition.

    Sabines I have owned work well for guitars but seem to struggle to recognize bass notes.

    If you are going to use it sparingly, I wouldn't worry about getting a really nice one. Unless you want to drop a few hundred on a Peterson strobe, the only thing you are really paying for is features like line through, oversize and/or lighted display, switchable mute, etc., which are nice in a gig setting, but otherwise frills. You are no more in tune with a $200 rack mount tuner than you would be with that little $20 Korg.
     
  3. For everyday, is there any reason to buy an electronic tuner.?I used a tuning fork that you whacked on your foot and then placed (very gently) on the bass's body. It sounded and 'a" and I thought that it worked very well, but is there a compleling reason to buy digital?

    Beth
     
  4. Whack it on your knee then hold it against the tip of the bridge or in your teeth. Hold your ear against the back of the neck to use harmonics to tune adjacent strings.

    Or use a tuner...
     
  5. mchildree

    mchildree Supporting Member

    Sep 4, 2000
    AL/GA
    I've had great results with the Intellitouch Tuner, which doesn't require electronic input...you just clip it to your bridge and tune. It's great for gigs too, because it really works well with the slightest touch of the strings, so you can tune at very low volume. Seems to me to be as accurate as anything I've ever used and it also works very well for other stringed instruments.
     
  6. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    The one that I've always used and is definitely worth the extra cash is the Boss TU-12 (http://www.bossus.com/index.asp?pg=1&tmp=67 -- it's one of those damned Flash sites, so you're going to have to navigate to the listing). You have digital and analog feedback, which is particularly nive with DB as the pitch on any given note, especially open strings, wanders all over hell. The analog needle is slower than digital and so gives you a running average on where the string is, and you still have digital 'left or right' arrows to give you the immediate reading. It's also wired to handle low frequencies better than your average tuner.
     
  7. RevGroove

    RevGroove Commercial User

    Jul 21, 2002
    Burlington ON Canada
    Manager, Account Services: Long & McQuade Ltd. (Burlington); MTD Kingston Basses International Emerging Artist; Bartolini Electronics Emerging Artist
    For $25 bucks more (prolly less in the U.S.) I'd go for the Boss TU-15...couple more features, extended range (the TU12 doesn't tune my open B string on a fiver), and it's back lit. Still have a TU-12 as a backup, but the TU-15 is definitely where it's at!
     
  8. Jeff Bollbach

    Jeff Bollbach Jeff Bollbach Luthier, Inc.

    Dec 12, 2001
    freeport, ny
    Thanks for the replies guys, but I am still a little in the dark. I am not sure either of the aforementioned tuners are what I want. Let me clarify. It seems both those models just tune certain notes[mebbe I am wrong] What I need is not to tune a bass, but to go for certain fingered notes. I have a client who wants me to put pearl dots on the side of the board at Bb, C, and D on the E string. I just want another tool besides my ear so I can nail it. {measure twice, cut once]. I have also had folks want me to mark the notes on an extension. Can these tuners mark a Db below low E?
     
  9. scott reed

    scott reed Supporting Member

    Nov 4, 2002
    Memphis
    Hey Jeff, I found something in my copy of Bob Benedetto's
    "Making an Archtop Guitar" that might help. On page 122
    he suggests the following formula to establish the fret
    spacing for any scale length. "Using 17.817" as a derivative,
    divide the fretboard scale (he uses 25", but perhaps it would
    work for a 41.5, 42 or 42.5" mensure as well) by 17.817 and
    round off to the nearest thousanth. The result is 1.403" the
    distance between the nut and first fret. The remainder
    23.597" is now the distance from the first fret to the bridge.
    Divide that distance (23.597") by the derivative 17.817".
    The result is 1.324" which is the distance between the first and second fret with a remainder of 22.272". Continue
    dividing successive remainders by the constant 17.817"
    until all the fret spacings are established."
    Just a suggestion from a non-luthier - or I guess you could
    use a tuner!
     
  10. Chasarms

    Chasarms Casual Observer

    May 24, 2001
    Bettendorf, IA USA
    Or just click here:

    http://www.manchesterguitartech.co.uk/fret_calculator.php
     
  11. Chasarms

    Chasarms Casual Observer

    May 24, 2001
    Bettendorf, IA USA

    Any tuner labeled as chromatic will recognize any pitch in the chromatic scale and allow you to fine tune it. You are correct in that some sold are not chromatic.

    As for recognizing the very low notes, some do it better than others. I think the little Korg I have will read C1. It tunes the open B on my slab without issues.
     
  12. tsolo

    tsolo

    Aug 24, 2002
    Ft. Worth
    Here's what you want. With this baby, you can tune a piano, harp, dulcimer. Why you could probably tuna fish.

    Tuner
     
  13. RevGroove

    RevGroove Commercial User

    Jul 21, 2002
    Burlington ON Canada
    Manager, Account Services: Long & McQuade Ltd. (Burlington); MTD Kingston Basses International Emerging Artist; Bartolini Electronics Emerging Artist
    The TU-15 will. $125 Canadian (b4 taxes)

    Edit: it also has a handy feature for helping set intonation, it beeps when the note is in tune, and it will tune bass, guitar, alternate tunings and chromatic.
     
  14. Nick Ara

    Nick Ara

    Jul 22, 2002
    Long Island, NY
    For the "introductory" price of $440, this tuner better catch the fish, too.

    http://www.precisionstrobe.com/
     
  15. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    All of the Boss TU tuners that we're haggling over are chromatic tuners and do what you want. The TU 15 sounds interesting and I'm going to go look it up right now...



     
  16. Joe Taylor

    Joe Taylor

    Dec 20, 2001
    Tracy CA
    If it says it's a chromatic tunner then it does all the notes. They all seem to have problems with notes below the a string.

    Joe
     
  17. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
    I use the Intellitouch Tuner. It is spring loaded and you can put on the bridge easily. It tunes chromatically, is backlit, and you can change "A" from 440 to 438 and to 442.

    Best tuner I've encountered in years for accuracy and ease of use.
    $50 from stewmac.
     
  18. I've been very happy with the Korg OT-12. In quiet environments I use the built-in microphone, but the optional contact mic is more useful when the ambient noise is high.

    - Wil
     
  19. The tuning forks are great if you have a totally quiet situation, like in a practice room.but if you ever plan to play outside of your house, you will appreciate having a tuner where you can see your pitch on LED's.
     
  20. Thanks Reedo! If I ever end up in a noisy situation, I'll know what to do.

    Beth