Emory Gordy Jr.

Discussion in 'Bassists [BG]' started by Rob W, Mar 15, 2001.

  1. A few people have mentioned Emory around here lately, and I'm curious as to what work he has done. My only knowledge of his playing is from his work with Neil Diamond in the early '70's. He became Diamond's live bass player in 1970 (although Joe Osborn still did the studio dates) and played guitar, steel guitar, glock, and anything else that wasn't tied down on the 'Hot August Night' Album. He did record the bass parts on the 1974 'Serenade' album which features the famous bass line in 'Longfellow Serenade' which most of us have probably heard.

    As far as I know, he parted ways with Diamond shortly after that, and I have no idea what he's been up to since. Anybody know?
  2. I mention him a lot because I believe he is one of the unsung heroes. He played with Presley, both live and on record, then did a long stint with Emmylou Harris' Hot Band. For the last 15 or so years he has been a top Nashville producer, and still does the odd bit of playing. He played a P bass with the pickup wired straight to the output socket, and had a knack for playing seemingly simple, deep in the pocket lines, and throwing in the odd devastating fill, or flight up the neck.
  3. I did find out a bit about him, including the fact that he's married to Patty Loveless.
  4. winston

    winston Supporting Member

    May 2, 2000
    Berkeley, CA
    He played on some of Billy Joel's '70's stuff (I think Streetlife Serenade) and it was great. I also heard him on an old Liberace record that a friend picked up at a thrift store, and while the music was corny as hell, the bass was interesting.
  5. bassdude51

    bassdude51 Supporting Member

    Nov 1, 2008
    Central Ohio
    Help me out, please!

    Which back issue of Bass Player Magazine covered Emory Gordy Jr and told his story behind the Burning Love bass line?

    I've lost the issue or just can't find it.

    If I remember correctly, Gordy never intended for that bass line to be in the original recording. It was his "spur of the moment" improvised bass line for the first take.

    He considered the bass line to be excessive and he thought it'd never be accepted and expected that he would have to re-do the bassline. For him, it was nothing more than an out take effort.

    How surprised he was that the producer went with that bass line! Emory never intended it to be the one for the final take.

    Well, that's what I remember reading but I'm not sure. I want to try to find that old article in Bass Player.

    Please help me out.

    Thank-you TBers.
  6. JTE


    Mar 12, 2008
    Central Illinois, USA
    I recall reading that story too. It was a L O N G time ago, and may have been in Guitar Player, before Bass Player existed.