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End Pin Not Flush with body on King Doublebass Tigerking

Discussion in 'Setup & Repair [DB]' started by wheelsup247, Apr 14, 2018.


  1. wheelsup247

    wheelsup247 Supporting Member

    7BFBD983-596B-40CF-8A5B-325B2F0073BE. See attached picture from the bottom left side of my King Doublebass Tigerking whilst laying on it’s back. Is it abnormal for the endpin to pull away from the body when the strings are tightened? If indeed abnormal, does anyone have a recommended solution so the endpin stays flush with the body (and endpin straight) when the strings are tuned to pitch? The endpin and hole it goes in are in good shape.
     
  2. Whoa. He totally overbored that one. You may need another endpin collar. If the gap was less extreme I’d suggest shimming it, but that is ridiculous.
     
    DoubleMIDI and james condino like this.
  3. wheelsup247

    wheelsup247 Supporting Member

    Thanks for confirming this is not right.
    I’m in the Huntsville Alabama area. Any idea of who in the area could fix this or a temporary solution? I have a gig a week from today.
     
  4. Gollihurmusic.com has a list of luthiers by state.

    Hopefully it’s only a $100 problem. How old is the bass?
     
  5. wheelsup247

    wheelsup247 Supporting Member

    Thanks. I had it made by King Doublebass in 2009. I am reading about some guys enlarging the diameter of the endpin collar to fit the over-bored hole by wrapping masking tape around the collar piece. Is that a temporary solution.
     
  6. Yes. If the hole in the endpin block becomes deformed from round to oval, you’re screwed, because the bass was assembled with Gorilla Glue which means you can’t open it up and replace a failed block like you could on any other bass ever.
     
    salcott likes this.
  7. wheelsup247

    wheelsup247 Supporting Member

    Well I certainly hope the hole is not deformed. It took the guys almost 2 years to get it to me (think it might have been the last one out the door before they went out of business. I will have to check this out. Thanks.
     
  8. robobass

    robobass

    Aug 1, 2005
    Cologne, Germany
    Private Inventor - Bass Capos
    Sandpaper would be better than masking tape. In fact, don't use anything adhesive. It will make things all the more difficult down the road. Considering the thickness you need to build up I'd go grab the thickest piece of emery cloth (or coarse, cloth-backed sandpaper) you can find at the hardware store and use that.
     
    DoubleMIDI likes this.
  9. wheelsup247

    wheelsup247 Supporting Member

    Thanks, that is exactly what I’ll do.
     
  10. Remark:
    I wrote that yesterday or two days ago, but it didn't got send out.
    Robobass idea of using sandpaper is maybe even better, but both is possible.
    ---
    I would take something that doesn't get compressed a lot.
    Masking tape might be not ideal/useable, but simply wrapping layers of paper or cardboard around might help as a temporary solution.

    The bad part is that you need to take the endpin assembly out of the hole to do that and therefor need to tune down the strings so bridge and tailpiece can be removed.
    Before you do that mark the position of the bridge feet on the top and the string length from nut to bridge, so you can reassemble and readjust to the current state.
    Take the bass on its back on a bed or carpet, put some heavier books at the top at the G side where the bridge was to avoid a falling soundpost.
    Remove the tailwire from the endpin assembly and take the endpin collar out of the bass. Wrap paper or cardboard around the collar, better a bit more and shorten the paper or cardboard strip after you grid it if the collar doesn't fit in completely. Repeat removing some paper/cardboard until it fits. If the endpin collar cannot be moved sideways you can leave it that way.
     
  11. Guys. 200+ pounds of constant torque over years can deform the spruce the block is carved from. You’re dreaming if you think cardboard will stand up to that. A wider diameter hardwood endpin collar is his best bet considering how oversized the hole is.
     
  12. robobass

    robobass

    Aug 1, 2005
    Cologne, Germany
    Private Inventor - Bass Capos
    Agreed it would be better to get a proper fitting socket, but I have a feeling a large enough one might not exist. The proper fix is to fashion and glue in a spruce plug, then drill and re-ream. Expensive. Cloth-backed sandpaper shouldn't compress much.
     
    RSBBass likes this.
  13. misterbadger

    misterbadger Supporting Member

    Sep 13, 2012
    Northern California
    Is there any reason that a larger-than-standard endpin plug couldn't be fabricated to match a reshaped/resized socket? Seems like an easy job for anyone with a lathe, no?
     
    james condino likes this.
  14. robobass

    robobass

    Aug 1, 2005
    Cologne, Germany
    Private Inventor - Bass Capos
    Actually, getting the taper just right is trickier than you might think. Ask your luthier if you can look at a bunch of old sockets and measure them with a machinist's protractor. You will see why so many don't fit properly.
     
  15. misterbadger

    misterbadger Supporting Member

    Sep 13, 2012
    Northern California
    Hell, everything's trickier than I might think. This doesn't seem like it would be too bad, though. Make a properly-tapered hole in a piece of scrap, turn the plug as close as possible, chalk-fit to the test hole, repeat as needed. A flat cabinet scraper works great as a turning tool for final adjustments.
     
    james condino likes this.
  16. james condino

    james condino Spruce dork Supporting Member Commercial User

    Sep 30, 2007
    asheville, nc
    While I may have solid skills working on basses, my lathe skills are only moderately above enthusiastic neophyte. It takes me about 45 minutes to turn a very accurate endpin. Patience (90%) and a good lathe (10%)....the perfect excuse to bring home a new tool for the shop!!!!
     
  17. That was only meant as a temporary solution which was what the OP was asking for.
    There is no way to keep this for a longer time, but better something wrapped around than nothing. An appointment with a luthier needs to be made quickly, but if there are some gigs until then, it might hold better with some (low compression) wraps than as it is now.
     
  18. robobass

    robobass

    Aug 1, 2005
    Cologne, Germany
    Private Inventor - Bass Capos
    I don't disagree, but I'll bet James will report pulling sandpaper out of socket holes which has been there since the Great War:)
     
    james condino likes this.
  19. The endpin collar on my Kolstein is doing this as well, but not to that extreme. However I use a Laborie endpin so it doesn’t bother me...although I do plan to get it repaired soon.
     
  20. robobass

    robobass

    Aug 1, 2005
    Cologne, Germany
    Private Inventor - Bass Capos
    Let's call it the "socket". I think of the "endpin collar" as the metal band on the socket which holds the thumb screw. Disagreements?
     
    james condino and misterbadger like this.

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