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Endpin Reamer

Discussion in 'Setup & Repair [DB]' started by ImAGoodDuck, May 13, 2005.


  1. Is an endpin reamer entirely necessary when you put in a new endpin? Can you just sand the endpin socket down to fit or is this not good for your bass?
     
  2. Sanding the socket so it is nice and round and keeps that 1;17 taper is not so easy to do.Always easier to do the hole than the pole...
     
  3. Brent Norton

    Brent Norton

    Sep 26, 2003
    Detroit, MI
    The reamer ensures a uniform fit for the endpin plug. When sanding, you run the risk of getting things out of round or taper, meaning the plug will not seat properly. Besides, a reamer makes the job a helluva lot easier than trying to sand things to fit. Swing the bass by a luthier's shop if you have one nearby. It won't take long, and the cost will be more than reasonable.

    Edit: Is there an echo? Oh yeah - it's me... Gotta love simultaneous posts.
     
  4. Excuse my ignorance, but I've only seen adjustable end pins with a screw lock.

    I take it from this conversation that another type are a wedge fit, so you have to know the height you want your end pin and then it just plugs in using the taper to secure it?
     
  5. Brent Norton

    Brent Norton

    Sep 26, 2003
    Detroit, MI
    The issue is fitting the actual endpin plug into the tail block of the instrument. The plug is tapered, and the reamer sizes the block to accept the plug.
     
  6. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    I love it when you talk dirty, Brent!
     
  7. Jimmy do you have a wife? ;-) Just kiddin. So how does the reamer work? How would it make the whole wider without cracking a bunch of wood up?
     
  8. I'm still not of the opinion that you couldn't acheive a good fit by sanding. But some people just like these reamers a lot. Or maybe they are not familiar with the technique of sanding the creates a good fit. There is more than one way to do this however. The way I'm talking about is to wrap the paper around the plug and then turn the plug in an approximately sized hole until the fit is perfect. Anyway, that's a way to do it without reamers and yes, you sand the inside of the hole, not the outside of the pole. If you prefer reamers, ream away.
     
  9. M_A_T_T

    M_A_T_T

    Mar 4, 2004
    Canada
  10. Chasarms

    Chasarms Casual Observer

    May 24, 2001
    Bettendorf, IA USA
    This has been suggested many, many times over the last few years at TBDB. There are even a few that report to have done it successfully. It's certainly possible.

    I'd say it's possible to get a good fit with 1/4" rasp, but I won't try it knowing if I goof it, the end block is trashed. My biggest concern using paper is that: 1. It'd take forever 2. The continuous removal and replacement of the sandpaper-covered plug would round over the edges unless you were perfect every single time you put it back in. I also think the excess sandpaper would round over the edges a bit from the compression. The leading edge of the plug hole it really key to keeping the plug from leaning forward

    I think the main point is that it makes little sense to risk it when a luthier will usually only charge you about $20 or so to ream it out with the right tool.

    I'm not above creative solutions, but the risk has to be minimal. When I bought my KC strings endpin, I carried the old plug to the shop and had the guy measure it and give me a pin with a plug of the same size. When I got home, it didn't fit. It was slightly oversized.

    Rather than risk sanding out the block, I put the plug on the actual endpin and and installed it in my drill press. A little 220 on a stiff block and the plug was a few thousandths smaller in no time.
     
  11. Yeah, end-pin reamers always fascinated me...it seems the one on MATTS link is a pretty good price...no?
    You really can't see it too well on the pic, but they have these long razor-sharp edged blades running down the length of the reamer.
    Kinda like a sick marital aid! Ouch! :crying:
     
  12. arnoldschnitzer

    arnoldschnitzer AES Fine Instruments

    Feb 16, 2002
    Brewster, NY, USA
    Sandpaper is a smoothing tool, not a stock-removal or cutting tool. It's the wrong tool for the job.
     
  13. SteveS

    SteveS Guest

    I have fitted a new endpin using sandpaper wrapped around the plug, with a shaft installed, the shaft put in the chuck of a variable speed powered portable drill. You have to wrap, of course, the paper in the proper direction. It worked very well. I had a luthier (who shall remain nameless) install a new endpin on my other bass, using a reamer. Through inattention he enlarged the hole too much, compromising the fit. So... If you're in the business, no doubt a reamer is a great thing to have, but for the occassional tinkerer, sandpaper and GREAT CARE work well.

    Steve Schuster
     
  14. I really hate crooked end-pins...that seems to mess with my brilliant sense of order!
     
  15. Somebody on the list, just a couple weeks ago, found an old bass that had the old wooden stick in type end-pin. The male or wooden shaft with the crutch tip on was carved or turned like an antique chair leg. Guys use to carry several lengths in their bass bags to accomodate other players at sessions and such. We use to run the shaft over a candle to wax up the taper so it wouldn't get stuck! It was common to see these made out of broomstick handles. You could tell because they were different colors.....
    Don'tcha just love these old stories about the good ole days?
     
  16. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    I saw an endpin reamer once...she was lovely.

    Sorry, but I really enjoy saying "endpin reamer."
     
  17. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    When I asked about alternatives to using the endpin reamer here loooong ago, I remember someone suggesting that it was possible to regrind a regular ol' spade bit to the profile of the plug, and use it to ream the proper size hole. I guess you would have to be very careful with the alignment when performing the job, though.
     
  18. M_A_T_T

    M_A_T_T

    Mar 4, 2004
    Canada
    http://homepages.enterprise.net/gwyllum/bass/cbassendpin.html
     
  19. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    Wow...that was quick! Thanks, Matt, I knew I was that somewhere.

    It seems like this would only work on new construction, though, since the tip of a spade bit needs to bite into wood in order to really align itself well. Just a layman's observation, and the reason why I take my bass to a luthier rather that work on it myself. Too scary for me!
     
  20. I have only seen pictures of the endpin reamers and havent seen the little razors or whatnot on there. That makes a lot more sense now lol. I was thinkin you have to wail on the bass or somethin to widen the hole lol. It sounds like both have drawbacks but as long as you kind of know what you are doing they both work.