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Englehardt EC1 board wood

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by bssist, Jan 14, 2012.


  1. bssist

    bssist

    Jun 23, 2007
    St. Louis, MO USA
    Can anyone tell me what wood they're using for the fingerboard on the EC1? It is described as exotic hardwood. I really like the look of it, but assume it must be much cheaper than ebony.

    Thanks
     
  2. Jatoba, also called Brazilian cherry.
     
  3. bssist

    bssist

    Jun 23, 2007
    St. Louis, MO USA
    Thanks for the info. Do you know where it lies on the density chart? I'm guessing it's less desirable than ebony because of density or "hardness", or is it just asthetics?
     
  4. It's not as hard as ebony but harder than rosewood IIRC. There are charts available online.
     
  5. bssist

    bssist

    Jun 23, 2007
    St. Louis, MO USA
    Thanks, I must not have looked long enough. Missed the one with jatoba.

    Much appreciated !
     
  6. Anytime.
     
  7. Another factor which is important to consider when examining a fingerboard is the regularity of its growth. Any significant bending of the grain, knots, and the degree to which the board is cut on the quarter are all important in understanding how it might behave throughout the year, as humidity changes. The simpler the grain, very generally speaking, the less likely it is to warp significantly. A perfectly quarter sawn piece (edges of the annular rings appear on the face, like a lot of closely spaced lines parallel to the strings) is least likely to warp, provided there is no hidden twist in the growth of the tree and no significant run-out (ie; the wood is sawn quite closely to how it would split) and no significant knots. The most worrisome area is the several inches just clear of the neck, around the octave. If there is serious grain distortion in this area it will almost certainly result in serious warping come the next season. No amount of re-dressing can solve this, as Jeff Bollbach attests on his website here:
    Jeff Bollbach Luthier, Inc.: Luthier Rant
    A painful, labour-intensive and expensive experience, which taught him well that there is no savings when cheaping out on a fingerboard. Slab cut wood isn't quite so bad as that with crooked grain and knots, but is still much more prone to bowing up or down than is quarter sawn wood.

    That said, for the most part the fingerboards I've seen on Englehardt basses have been of fairly decent quality, whether ebony or some other hardwood. I find the necks to be a bit too thin, but some players like that. Some others find it tends to cramp the hand, leading to tendon problems. A neck can be made thicker of course, removing the fingerboard and adding a wedge or flat layer, but this is costly.
     
  8. bssist - is your bass brand spankin' new or pre-owned ? . . . if it's not new, then the type of wood could/most likely will vary with the date of manufacture. They have used different woods over the years. If it's a significantly (?) older model, check the label for serial number/cross reference the date, give 'em a call <847-593-5850> & just simply ask ;)
     
  9. bssist

    bssist

    Jun 23, 2007
    St. Louis, MO USA
    Thanks for all the info. I don't actually have an englehardt. I do have a ccb w/ a maple board that had been "ebonized" (What a crock! I think that implies that it has been treated to make it harder). My luthier planed it recently and I really like the look with the left over dye. I just saw the EC-1 with the similar looking board and thought I'd learn a little more about it. Everybody's got a black board. I like something that still looks classy but has individuality and character.
     
  10. Actually, what it really means that it has been stained/painted to look darker, as ebony might ;)

    There are various grades of ebony that appear in variegated shades from medium to dark brown to almost black . . . I've yet to see any ebony wood as black as piano keys; however, that is not meant to imply that it doesn't exist :rolleyes:
     
  11. bssist

    bssist

    Jun 23, 2007
    St. Louis, MO USA
    Yeah, I got that. I don't remember where I originally learned about the actual color of ebony. I just think that the term itself is mis-leading and it should be called what it is, stained.

    But alas, marketing...

    Perhaps it could be epoxificated and darkenized. That would be kind of ebonized.
     

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