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EP and LP

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by jonasp, Jun 12, 2003.


  1. I can't find anything on the net. What is an EP? and LP?

    If my band put out a 5-6 track CD, what would it be called?

    Thanks
     
  2. an EP is short for Extended play, and LP is short for Long Play (in the days of records).

    based on songs alone, i think it would be an EP, but if the songs together total 30+ minutes, it would be classified as an LP
     
  3. It comes from the days of vinyl.
    The single used to be much more popular meaning a 7" 45 rpm record with one song on each side.
    A full length 12" 33rpm record was called a Long Play (LP) record.
    Then there was this third thing in between. I believe it started as Extended Play (EP) where you put more songs on a 7" single by jamming the grooves in tighter or running it at 33rpm to give it more playing time. There's also 10" singles, 10" EPs, even 10" LPs, 12" singles, 12" EPs, all kinds of formats.
    Anywayz, it's commonly accepted (in my circles at least) to call a full length record anywhere from 20 to 45 minutes (or more) an LP and something between 10 and 20 minutes an EP. When you're talking punk bands we've done 7"s at 33 rpm with 7 minutes per side and call it an EP.

    oops, guess I took to long with my answer
     
  4. Old person with records he still plays will attempt to answer unless senility takes over first.;)

    EP = Extended Play this has two or maybe 3 tracks per side as compared to the one on a Single

    LP = Long Play this is the normal length record now superceded by the CD. This has around 20-22 minutes of music per side and you could normally tape both sides of the LP on to one side of a C90 audio cassette.

    If you have a 5 or 6 track CD you could call it an EP or simply a demo CD. Either way good luck with your CD.

    Regards

    Matthew
     
    5alive likes this.