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Epiphone EB-3 VS. Fender P-bass VS. Fender J-bass

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by 4strings_please, Aug 21, 2012.


  1. 4strings_please

    4strings_please

    Feb 1, 2012
    I've been playing my EB-3 for about 4 years now and i am thinking of changing it to either a fender p-bass or a j-bass for the modern punk tones, the bass still pounding in your body but with the treble response to cut through the guitars. i wanted some true bass players opinions on the matter.
    Thanks.
     
  2. PBnJBassist

    PBnJBassist

    Mar 8, 2011
    Dallas, TX
    Modern punk tones? Get a P-bass.
     
  3. droo46

    droo46

    Jun 16, 2011
    Get a Precision or a PJ and a VT bass pedal. That will serve you well as a punk bassist.
     
  4. mpdd

    mpdd neoconceptualist

    Mar 24, 2010
    LA
    if you like gibsons, try a grabber

    i use an sb2 nowadays
    hot pickups, very playable, and thick overdriven sound with my tube amp
     
  5. Wallace320

    Wallace320 Commercial User

    Mar 19, 2012
    Milan, Italy
    The Edwards is a MIJ ESP P bass worth $. 100.00 more than a Fender Precision Classic, but already has Seymour Duncan split pick-up, that I'd recommend to be an SPB2 to be installed on the Fender Precision Classic for your sound purposes.

    Cheers,
    Wallace
     
  6. Of the choices you have given, I would recommend the Fender Jazz. Basically, anything with two pickups, either jazz single coils, soapbars or a PJ, would give the best tone for modern punk in my opinion. You need both a neck pickup for the beef and a bridge pickup for the bite to get a good aggressive and powerful sound.

    Many of the punk bands I listen to and almost all the local bands I play with use jazzes or similar type basses. I find the jazz will give the best punch you are probably looking for.

    Alternatively, you cannot go wrong with a precision in punk but I find that doesn't quite cover the "modern" tone of having an aggressive growl and punch. The P is more of a booming rumble than a punch.

    Do you have any examples, either bands or songs, in particular that have the sound you are going after?
     
  7. Ric5

    Ric5 Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jan 29, 2008
    Colorado
    I convert 4 string Rickenbackers to 5 string basses.
    You want more treble ... Jazz bass
     
  8. "The P is more of a booming rumble than a punch."

    Really? Try listening to JJ Burnel of The Stranglers - all their early classic stuff was recorded with a P-Bass ;)
     
  9. I've been in a few punk bands and preferred to play any of my precisions over my one jazz to cut through two guitars and still have a fat low end. How about some examples of the punk tones you're thinking off.

    Rancid, NOFX, against me, dropkick Murphys, kid dynamite, paint it black. Mostly all precisions.
     
  10. Stealth

    Stealth

    Feb 5, 2008
    Zagreb, Croatia
    Except for NoFX because Fat Mike loves his Danelectro Shorthorn. Except that's not a Jazz either because it has lipstick pickups which are a whole new ballgame. :D
     
  11. experimental bassist

    experimental bassist

    Mar 15, 2009
    Precision.

    With a fresh set of round wounds.

    And the volume cranked.

    You won't look back. ;)
     
  12. He uses those now because of back problems, but in the older days he used P's a lot and a few G&L's
     
  13. Stealth

    Stealth

    Feb 5, 2008
    Zagreb, Croatia
    I didn't know that. Thanks for setting me straight on the facts. :)
     
  14. Wallace320

    Wallace320 Commercial User

    Mar 19, 2012
    Milan, Italy
    My all time hero steve harris from Iron Maiden plays and played
    Precision basses to wildly cut thru his bandmix, very much like all those punks, he met back in the days, easily used to do in their less articulate band sonic spectrum.

    Do you remember Sid Vicious & Glen Matlock from Sex Pistols?

    Right away, we're talking about "modern punk"? Flower Punk? Or whatever...

    Mike Dirnt from Green Day plays his signature Fender Precision:
    a '51 ash slab body with a '59 split pickup.
    Mark Hoppus from Blink182 plays his signature Fender Jazz... ok, if only it's a Jazz bass with a Precision neck and a Seymour
    Duncan quarter pound split pickup, now even reversed: stable lows with highs rolled towards their lows as well (no tone pot);
    Greg K from Offspring played Ibanez RD and plays Ibanez ATK: they share more with MusicMan StingRays/Sterlings than Jazz.

    So what?!

    Cheers,
    Wallace
     
  15. HMZ

    HMZ Supporting Member

    Dec 21, 2003
    USA-Mineola
    P bass for punk
     
  16. SpaceRitual87

    SpaceRitual87

    Sep 19, 2012
    Personally, I would try each fender out at your local guitar store. I was in a punk rock band for many years and used both, so it really all depends on what your preferences are. P bass pickups generally have more bottom end, more volume output, and a wider c shaped neck. J basses have more punch/treble with a faster/comfortable neck. By the way, punk rock was never really about a particular sound, in the beginning it was more about being creative with what you had, and being committed to the DIY ethos, and not sounding like/looking like/ acting like/ everyone else. Be yourself, don't limit yourself to only one or two brand names, try out as many basses as you can and find the one that does what you want to do. "Punk is whatever we made it to be," ( D. Boon of The Minutemen).
     
  17. crobasster

    crobasster

    Jun 16, 2009
    croatia
    Lakland Jerry Scheff sign.
     
  18. I never said that the P bass cannot cut through a mix or wouldn't sound good. Punk was built on P basses. They are great and many of my bass heroes play them. I had said, "Alternatively, you cannot go wrong with a P bass in punk".

    The OP asked about a "modern" punk tone and I believe a Jazz would be the better choice. It's only my recommendation and does not mean a P bass wouldn't work either.

    And to what SpaceRitual87 said, I agree 100%. People in punk music don't really care what what kind of bass you are playing so just use whatever feels and sounds best to you. Just because it seems everyone else uses a P bass does not mean you have to.
     

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