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Epiphone EB0 wiring issue. Help?

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by theoctavist, May 23, 2020.


  1. theoctavist

    theoctavist

    Feb 4, 2020
    Was given the bass. Love that vintage, no high end sound,, but it kept cutting out. Took the back cover off and noticed that the wire coming from the bridge was broken. So ...I see it is soldered to the one pot. *But * my question is this. Does a wire need to be run to *every part* of the 3point bridge(every anchor point) and the strap button/tail piece as well ? And how does the routing go? I took the anchors out(took work as they were epoxied in. Badly) and noticed that only one of the anchors had wire on it. Is this right? Help? Thank you
     

    Attached Files:

  2. The stock, chrome bridge is conductive so only one post needs to be connected to ground. That, however, should not be causing the signal to cut out. I’d suspect an intermittent connection in one of the solder joints.
     
    HG1180 likes this.
  3. theoctavist

    theoctavist

    Feb 4, 2020
    Thank you Matt. Two questions.
    1) wrt the ground. Does it go straight from the bridge anchor point to the solder point on the pot? Or does the tail/strap need to be in there too(as with guitars ime)
    2) re signal cut out. It cut out and came back in according to how I was holding the guitar. On its back, it cut back in. Holding it normally it cut out. Shaking gently, same thing. Idk if that's relevant or pertinant but. Thanks again
     
  4. If it’s the stock 3 point EB0 bridge just one of the mounting stud inserts need to have the ground wire connected to it. Although, if it’s epoxied in you’ll need to make sure the ground wire is touching the insert and not buried in epoxy. I guess I’m not sure what you mean by a separate tailpiece, is it a replacement bridge?

    The electronic symptoms still sound like a bad solder joint or possibly a pot. I’m not great at long distance troubleshooting so it’s hard to say without the bass in hand.
     
  5. theoctavist

    theoctavist

    Feb 4, 2020
    Thank you @Matt Liebenau , I was just asking if the ground wire needed to go to the end strap button *in addition to* the one point on the bridge. Some guitars are grounded that way. You're a godsend buddy thank you!
     
  6. theoctavist

    theoctavist

    Feb 4, 2020
    Oh and I figured out the cut in/out issue. One of the wires inside the control panel was too long and shorting out /touching a cap leg
     
    leonard likes this.
  7. theoctavist

    theoctavist

    Feb 4, 2020
    So the ground from bridge point goes *directly to the back of the pot*, yes? (Sorry can't find the forum edit post function lol
     
  8. Normally, yes, the bridge ground goes to the back of a potentiometer. It can go to whatever is a convenient ground in the cavity. No, the strap button doesn’t need to be grounded. You’d do that if you had an archtop with a wooden bridge, then the tailpiece would get a ground connection and the strap button usually attaches there. The only time I could think of to ground the strap would be if you were using a chain strap like Eddie used to. :D

    Glad you found the cutting out issue. I thought of something touching inside but I forgot to type it.
     
  9. HG1180

    HG1180

    Aug 11, 2019
    Rehoboth Beach,DE
    Try heating all of the solder joints back up. Then report back!

    Should work to re-connect any loose solder joints which is what causes a signal to cut out:thumbsup:
     
  10. The strap buttons don’t need to be grounded. But the bridge definitely does. Glad you solved the shorting out problem.
     
  11. theoctavist

    theoctavist

    Feb 4, 2020
    Thank you @Matt Liebenau @Ostie and @HG1180 y'all are very kind and helpful. Now the only thing to do is clean out the bridge anchor cavity(epoxy and wire bits, and solder globs) prev owner was sloppy. (I'll take any advice lol!!) Much appreciated y'all. I'll keep you posted! Ray
     
    HG1180, Matt Liebenau and MCF like this.
  12. HG1180

    HG1180

    Aug 11, 2019
    Rehoboth Beach,DE
    No problem man! Always like to help out a fellow bassist.
     
  13. theoctavist

    theoctavist

    Feb 4, 2020
    @Matt Liebenau here's some pics of the control cavity. I know diagnosis is impossible here but just checking if you see anything funky. The only thing *I* see is that the input jack is too far recessed into the cavity, this making it impossible for the hex nut(on the fretboard side) to screw down. It just spins freely.
     

    Attached Files:

    Matt Liebenau likes this.
  14. theoctavist

    theoctavist

    Feb 4, 2020
    @HG1180 @Ostie @Matt Liebenau in addition to the above pics there is one more. This picture , specifically, gives me pause , because I cannot , for the life of me. ..see why anything would be soldered there? Maybe it's a glob of solder from sloppy work? Like from the factory or whatever. From soldering the jack? And last question. The discoloration around the jack itself (and the way that the jack doesn't budge, despite the fact that there is no hex nut) seems to imply that there was adhesive of some sort, used to secure the jack? If so how do I go about melting it to remove/fix the jack?
     

    Attached Files:

    Matt Liebenau likes this.
  15. Are the electronics not working? The only thing off the top of my head would be if the potentiometer contacts are touching the paint and if it is conductive shielding paint.

    Not sure on the output jack. That could be a bit of solder that splattered when the wires were soldered to the jack. The area around it being shiny makes me wonder if it is some type of adhesive. I’ve seen such weirdness before. Did you try to unscrew the jack? If the hole for the jack was a little tight or it’s a replacement that’s slightly larger then the original it could have been threaded into the body. If it won’t budge and it needs to come out and that is some type of glue you could use a soldering iron and try to heat the sleeve of the jack and loosen the glue. This could damage the paint and the jack, however.
     

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