Epiphone Thunderbird Problem

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by JAMiUs, May 26, 2005.

  1. JAMiUs


    May 26, 2005
    I got a problem with my Epiphone Thunderbird.
    As some of you may know (mostly those who have played an Epiphone Thunderbird) it is an extremly neck heavy guitar, and this can sometimes be a problem (because i'm a singer in my band, I sometimes like to grab the microphone or clap in the air) so when I do that my the head almost hits the ground and I feel like a fool.

    So anyway, I was thinking, how 'bout I move the strap button to the back of the guitar? like the Gibson model, so now i'm thinking.... where is it best to be? can anyone who owns a Gibson Thunderbird IV please tell me the measurements where the strap lock is? (I.E. xx CM away from top/bottem/neck (xx being the number))

    Thank you! (Sorry to be a burden!)
  2. 43apples

    43apples Guest

    Nov 9, 2003
    Hey man, i'm sorry that i can't answer your question about the strap button placement, but atleast i can give you a tip!

    What strap are you using? If the bass neckdives, that means that your strap slides over your shirt to accomodate that.

    Try using a leather strap that's rough on the inside, so that it "grips" your shirt\shoulder :). That worked tremendously for me, and also, leather straps look freakin' cool! And they smell good too :hyper: !

    Cheers! :D
  3. Secondhandloser


    Mar 28, 2005
    I agree with the idea of using a leather strap, but I also moved my strap buttons, I put the front one directly behind the neck, so that you can't see it from the front, and moved the back one up about two and a half inches... that should fiz it for ya... plus it looks cool to have to sets of strap buttons on your bass, I get comments everytime I play places, everyone thinks the bass is custom :)
  4. A9X


    Dec 27, 2003
    Sinny, Oztraya
    I understand your pain. I have a couple of Alembics with small bodies and bridges placed well to the left, that can neckdive like hell. Before I found a solution unique to my instruments, I experimented by taping the strap to the body in a number of places to work out the balance points for the body position (L/R relative to my centre), height and neck angle. Getting other people to give their measurements may help, but ultimately the different weight balance for individual instriments, not to mention your own ergonomic tastes, may not make that relevant to you and your instrument/preferences. Experiment!

    In the meantime, here's one other person's approach to the same problem.

    EDIT: looks liike the link is down temporarily. Basically, he moved the LH strap pin from above the neck to behind the neck/body join, where a Fender neckplate would be and found a big improvement in balance.