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Eventually, everyone converts to jazz.

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by XavierG, Oct 18, 2002.


  1. Here's a story from ejazz news -

    Rod Stewart Tests His Jazz Standards In Los Angeles

    Rod ain't so mod anymore. Mr. Stewart has taken to '40s jazz standards, and his new boss, Clive Davis, was happy to show him off Monday (Oct. 14) night at L.A.'s swank St. Regis Hotel. At a cocktail party to launch his new It Had to Be You ... The Great American Songbook album, due Oct. 22 on J Records, Stewart performed "They Can't Take That Away from Me" and "These Foolish Things," the latter accompanied by legendary saxophonist Dave Koz.

    Duded up in a grey designer suit straight out of Frank Sinatra's closet, Stewart crooned in a low breath that seemed to bypass his rasp. (He had thyroid cancer in 2001, but has fully recovered and performed since.)
    In the audience were VIPs Jack Osbourne (accompanying Stewart's daughter, Kimberly), Robbie Robertson, songwriter Diane Warren, producer Richard Perry, author Jackie Collins, actresses Sally Kellerman and Katherine Helmond, and Stewart flame Penny Lancaster.
    ______________________

    ejazz url is : http://www.ejazznews.com/article.php?sid=3226
     
  2. Music is the journey, Jazz is the destination. :cool:

    I always knew that. :)

    Mike Jazzman Jewels
     
  3. For some of us Classical is the destination. :)
     
  4. Benbass

    Benbass

    Jan 28, 2002
    Kansas
    Leaping lounge lizards!
     
  5. Boplicity

    Boplicity Supporting Member

    Oh my gosh!!!:eek: Tony Bennett must be shaking in his boots....not.
     
  6. electricdemon3

    electricdemon3

    Jul 28, 2000
    Hey! I saw that!
     
  7. Wow! This is the best news since Pat Boones' In a Metal Mood.

    You have to love lounge metal.
     
  8. Does anyone out there have the same thought as me; that Jazz can be thought of as classical music turned inside out?

    Think about it.

    Classical = very stuctured, you play what the composer wrote.

    Jazz = The training wheels come off, but, you'd better know what you're doing. What's the old saying? There are no wrong notes in Jazz, it's just how you resolve it. ;)

    Mike J.
     
  9. electricdemon3

    electricdemon3

    Jul 28, 2000
    Thats a great observation. Some of my favorite jazz heros, Thelonious Monk, Duke Ellington, Bill Evans, they all had extensive classical training when they were young.
     
  10. My history of jazz prof's definition of jazz is "the combination of African and European musical aesthetics." So really, the conservatory and jazz traditions are two sides of the same coin. After all, improvisational ability was expected of classical musicians as recently as what, 150 years ago?
     
  11. My KB player's favourite saying:

    "if the change you play doesn't sound quite right - play it twice as though you did it on purpose, then just say it's jazz.." :eek: ;)
     
  12. And in which two genres is the electric bass still considered a toy bass to some? (actually most) ;)
     
  13. electricdemon3

    electricdemon3

    Jul 28, 2000
    uh... both genres?
     
  14. Whoa, dude! You're, like, really good at multiple choice. [insert beavis butthead snorting here]
     
  15. electricdemon3

    electricdemon3

    Jul 28, 2000
    HaHa! thanks, Xavier, that just made my day!
     
  16. I think people would take BG more seriously in jazz if it weren't associated with the cheesy synths, shreddy guitars, and yakkety soprano saxes that seemed to dominate '80s jazz.
     
  17. Stewrt is washed up, his best days are waaaay behind him. Him converting to jazz is just a commercial gimmick. I say 'Booooooo!' to him. Hes copying that jumped up little Robbie Williams...




    :D :rolleyes:
     
  18. You could not have described my music any better. Were you taking a shot at me or something?
     
  19. No, but I've heard this almost verbatim from at least ten different horn players, pianists, and drummers.

    It's a real shame. Cornell's best bassist can simply rip on BG, but in the for-credit ensemble in which he plays, he is expected to play upright and does so in a rather workmanlike fashion.