Ever feel like packing it all in?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by XavierG, May 1, 2002.

  1. I remember hearing Alain Caron play, a couple of years back, and I seriously considered laying my bass to rest right then and there (just having picked it up after not having played for many years). You guys know that feeling? Well, I swore I wouldn't let 'ol Mr. Spider-hands put a damper on my bass playing, and I started practicing my bass playing fairly religously once again. I look back to that day (2 years ago) and am thankful that I opted to work at it rather than call it quits. I owe it all to Al who inspired me to keep at it.

    How many of you owe your devotion to the bass to a particular bassist? How many of you seriously considered packing it in after hearing someone play?

  2. I've been inspired by a number of guys. My first big hero was Geddy Lee. Later, Tony Levin and Jaco started rattling around my head. I got inspired to get into jazz by seeing Dave Holland tear it up on upright last September.

    I would never consider packing it in, because I know that there is always someone who sucks more than me. :D
  3. I never considered packing it in. I just got too wrapped up in life 20 years ago. (almost got married) After that disaster, I always wanted to get right back at it, but, as you get older, friends (a.k.a. local musicians) move away, die or just change their priorities. To make a long story even longer :D I almost got back into music a few other times, but, through hesitation and being a lazy dog, didn't do so until I couldn't take it anymore and went out and bought a fretless Jazz bass in July, 2000. I bless that day. And I haven't stopped since.
    The one major, stupid idiotic thing that made me not come back sooner, was that I always used to compare myself to Stanley Clarke! I used to look in the mirror and say, "Mike, you're never gonna be as good as him." Pretty stupid, eh? (not a Canadian dig:D ) That's why I tell any young whipper snapper to never give up and to just keep pushin'. I think once music/playing is in your blood, you take it with you to heaven. I don't compare myself to anyone anymore, and music from here on in will simply be - FUN~FUN~FUN!

    OH! I gotta go now; Daddy's trying to take the T-Bird away! :p

    Mike J.
    Never be discouraged!
  4. Brendan


    Jun 18, 2000
    Austin, TX
    I've had a lot of conflicts with playing music, with people, with myself, and with the money involved. I've thought more than once about packing it up, and letting a teenage passion lie. About then (about 2 years ago) I heard and saw one guy that made me just want to pick it up again. And everytime I get into the dumps about playing bass, I listen to the guy, and I get inspired again to keep working. The guy?

    Ryan Martinie. He's making the sounds that are in my head, and listening helps me direct myself.

    Course, now, I'm pretty much cemented in my role. Music will always be a part of my life. If I have to work a 9-5 job to afford the music, and have to do weekend shows, so be it. I just want to make music.
  5. I haven't ever considered packing it up......then again I've only been playing for a little less than 2 years......oh well.

    I don't really care about comparing myself to other people, if I do its never "damn, he's so good, he makes everything I do look like pudding on a corndog...I quit" more like..."He's making everything I do look like pudding on a corndog!! I must defeat him!" and work super hard at it.

    At the same time, I was involved with a band that was a difficult situation in itself. I got along with the guys alright, they were my friends, but our musical tastes sort of clashed. At the time I didn't really have any real style and just played what they wanted. Luckily I moved away before anything happened and I've jammed with them a couple times since then. Its fun, but not so sure its something I could do full time, or the way they like it.
  6. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    A lot of things in life make me wanna pack it in, but I never had that feeling when I listened to a bassist who is better than me.
  7. I've been feeling that a lot lately. a) Complete lack of inspiration. I want to write, but I hate everything I come up with. And the really garbage-water drinking part is that noone ever takes me seriously or wants to play in a band/jam with me. :(
  8. Lipis Roman

    Lipis Roman

    Mar 5, 2002
    I hear where you're comming from Xavier. I have those moments when I really get down on myself. For me it doesn't really come from being overwhelmed by any particular bassists technique or theoretical knowledge, it's about my own ability to write/compose songs. I've been playing the bass for roughly 13 years and I've yet to write a single song that I'm really proud of. Makes me think that I'm just destined to play other peoples music and that's not exactly a concept that thrills me.

    Times like that I'll start to think that maybe I should give up and maybe try a different instrument. But those moments usually fade pretty fast, in the end I know I'm a bassist and I just have to keep working on my writting skills.

    As far as owing my devotion to a particular bassist, a guy by the name of Dan Silver from my home town really inspired me to raise the bar with my playing. I must have been around 15 at the time, jamming at the local rehersal studios with a Metal group I was in at the time. We all went down to another groups studio to check them out and the bassist was grooving in ways that were completely foreign to me. Blew my mind.
  9. JP Bassman

    JP Bassman

    Jun 18, 2001
    the first time i heard schism my mouth dropped and i didnt play for like a week...then i got the tabs, watched the movies and got over it :)

    but, yeah thats the closest ive ever gotten.
  10. I've come close to quitting several times. Of course, for me it's not like that would be a huge event since it's mainly just one of my hobbies. I've been playing for about 4 years progressing slowly, and I haven't even looked for a band.

    Time for playing now while I'm in college is pretty slim. It doesn't take a genius to figure out which subject I spend most of my time studying (hint -- check my user title and sig).
  11. I'm just getting back into playing again over the last five or six months after taking about five years off. One of my last bands fell apart because of personality conflicts, and the other just faded out because no one had time for it. Hadn't had any excuse to play for quite a while, until an old friend asked me to join his cover band. Still hoping to find "the" band someday, but the skill I used to have is slow in coming back. Wish I'd never have stopped.
  12. Nino Valenti

    Nino Valenti Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 2, 2001
    Staten Island NYC
    Builder: Valenti Basses
    Usually when I hear someone that is beter than me it inspires me to play better. If I'm playing a gig & the bassist/band before is is great, it make me play at a higher level.

    When I really got in to Rush & Yes (buying all of the albums, especially the early stuff & not only listening to the radio hits) they made me wanna learn how to play. I really got in to Rush & tried to learn as many songs as I caould & even thought I couldn't (& still can't) do most of his difficult fills, I still wanted to learn more & more.

    The 1st time & watched the Jaco instructional video, I was IN AWE FOR A long time. I know I will probably never play as good as him, but he make me want to play more
  13. I usually get that feeling when its time to pack it all up. I'm damn near 50 now , and still doing classic rock & blues covers in local bars and the like. I absolutely love the sound of electric bass and without a doubt always will focus on the bass line to any music I hear ( I bet I'm not alone there).
    With such an affection for bass I can't picture myself ever giving it up. I've certainly been in awe of hundreds of players in my life but not really jealous to the point of giving up. I'm more of a (how'd he do that) kinda guy. Playing in a cover band one just realizes that some guys just weren't meant to be covered so you tend to leave their stuff alone out of respect or fear of humiliation etc.
    I'm sure I'll never be as good as I'd like to be ,but I think I'm better than I was.
  14. John Davis

    John Davis Guest

    Mar 27, 2001
    Houston, Texas
    I get that feeling sometimes, but now I just don't care. So what if they're better than me? I don't play for him, so it doesn't matter.
  15. This had always been the case with me when I was younger. I guess that having been so 'out of touch' for over 10 years (longer since I gigged), hearing Caron just at the time I started getting back into it made me feel like it was too late for me to 'start getting back into it'. I was 43. For weeks after that, I thought there was no point in trying. I was too old to get any better - too old for new tricks. It was only when I decided (and became comfortable knowing) that I didn't have to try to be as good as he (though it would be nice), nor anyone else, that I started to play again. As a hobbyist (like others who have replied) I don't feel pressured unless I'm pressuring myself.
  16. Albemuth


    Jan 13, 2002
    I think I know what you mean, I saw Alain Caron about 2 weeks ago and after that I felt so small and depressed, it also happened after Ric Fierabracci, Lincoln Goines...
    I have to wait bout a week before I han play again...but I'm only 18, I suppose there's still some time to become like they
  17. I certainly have had moments where I wondered if maybe life wouldn't have been better doing something else. I think after I did my solo cd in '99 that I became fully happy just being myself. To be honest I never compare myself to any other player and definitely do not put any of these guys on a pedestal. yes, they can play, but they can't play like me and their method of expression is as unique to them as mine is to me. I really believe we waste a lot of time in this life wondering if we measure up. The only standards we have to smash are our own. Sorry, little long winded.. Everyone have a great day!!!
  18. ashton


    Jan 4, 2001
    well i havea non bassist influence that makes me continue bass. Eddie Vedder, yep thats right, the lead man for Pearl Jam keeps me going. well ill admit theyre bassist Jeff Ament really kicks a$$ but Eddie the most, if you have no idea why they do then go and listen to 'Yellow Ledbetter' and if you dont cry...then you should be playing lead guitar. ( i dunno, ill uhhh....be posting over there...*runs out of the room* )
  19. CS


    Dec 11, 1999
    Right from the start if I ever met anyone 'better' my attitude was "right, how do I get them to show me stuff"

    I learnt slap bass from a pro player the first day I started playing

    I learnt reggae riffs from a semi pro player in a shop in st albans

    I met ex Skids bass player in a bar before the gig and chatted bass

    I taught a guy and 4 yrs later saw him again and he was so good I nicked his good bits and practiced like mad

    I tailed off again and in 99 found this site and chatting to JimK Staci Jere Bruce and Mik Walker renewed my enthusiasm

    I tailed off again and a mate told me that he had this amazing teacher called Steve Lawson, so I had a two hour lesson two months ago and I am still incorporating stuff into my playing.

    I have a problem when I'm surrounded by 'poorer' bassists as I end up teaching them for free. I'm too selfless I guess (ha ha)
  20. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    I find seeing a really s**t-hot bassist just makes me more inspired to play. I'll listen to their ideas and the sounds they make and imagine what I'd do with the technique. I go home and I try it out... it usually leads somewhere interesting regardless.