excuse me mike

Discussion in 'Ask Mike Watt [Archived]' started by stinkfist, Jun 9, 2004.

  1. hey umm do you have any tips for tuning? :help:
  2. Marlat


    Sep 17, 2002
    London UK
    Ummm....it may be helpful if you post a more specific question. Do you not know how to tune a bass?

    4 String (low to high) = E A D G
    5 String = B E A D G
    6 String = B E A D G C

    If you want to know "how" to tune, you either get a tuning peg and learn how to tune by ear, or buy an electronic tuner.
  3. ironmaidenisgod


    May 20, 2004
    Or use a piano or keyboards like I do.
  4. I use a $6.00 guitar tuner from musician's friend...but, in the past, I have used the dial tone (A=440) to get an A off the telephone.

    Using your friend's guitar or piano is okay if you are playing with them, and if they are in tune.

    Audio Phonics has a FREEware downloadable tuner that is avaiable...it works pretty good...and you can't beat the price!

    good luck,
  5. maxy


    Jun 24, 2004
    I use an electric tuner too but other than the gig sitatuaion does it help the ear or sth in anyway?
  6. Bob Clayton

    Bob Clayton Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Aug 14, 2001
    Deptford, NJ
    that's the coolest thing i've ever heard
  7. Bass Tranquil

    Bass Tranquil

    Nov 16, 2003
    If 440 is A, then what are the others? I just think that's cool.
  8. I think I was a little vague...

    the dial tone of the telephone is a 440 cycle tone...

    the same as an A note...an A note on a tuning fork/piano/tuner is a 440 cycle sound...

    The letter "A" on the telephone has some other sound...

    good luck
  9. I actually do have a tip for tuning. Once your in general range, tune down a little, and do all your fine tuning from there. I have found(well actually my friend always got on to me) the bass or guitar stays in tune longer, cause your last adjustments made to string are tightning it. When you fine tune from higher than the open note, your more likely to slip out of tune with harder playing, cause you just loosened your strings. Maybe I'm totally wrong, but I believe it does manke a difference.
  10. slinkp


    Aug 29, 2003
    brooklyn, NY, USA
    Mr. Eff is quite right.
    Get all the strings in the right ballpark, then for each string, lower it a bit and bring it gradually up to the right pitch. It's less likely to slip and go flat later.

    Another good trick is to pull on the strings, especially when new.
    Grab the string at (roughly) the 12th fret, and pull it firmly back and forth about an inch in each direction. Then check the pitch. Is it flat? Turn the peg until it's right again. Repeat. After doing this a couple times, even brand new strings will stay in tune all night - unless your bass is *really* bad :)

    I learned both these tips many years ago from guitar players. Keeping guitars in tune is really a pain!