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Extended Chords

Discussion in 'Music Theory [DB]' started by paintballjunkie, Dec 8, 2005.


  1. paintballjunkie

    paintballjunkie

    Jul 27, 2005
    Indiana
    I have a question, and i can't seem to find the answer. Anyway, what intervals do you add to get the 9th, 11th, or 13th of a chord? I don't get it, if the highest interval is a major seventh before you reach the octave, then why are they called 9th, 11th, and 13th? :confused:
     
  2. Jazz Ad

    Jazz Ad Mi la ré sol Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Because they're above the octave. It's that simple :)
    So if you bring a 2nd an octave up, you get 2nd+7 = 9th.
     
  3. paintballjunkie

    paintballjunkie

    Jul 27, 2005
    Indiana
    ok, so for a major 9th chord you add the major second an octave up, for add 11 you add the fourth an octave up,
    and a major 13th chord you add the major sixth an octave up?
     
  4. Jazz Ad

    Jazz Ad Mi la ré sol Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Yes.
    You will notice that they don't quite sound the same, especially in arpeggios. Using a 9th rather than a 2nd brings a lot of room into a chord.
     
  5. paintballjunkie

    paintballjunkie

    Jul 27, 2005
    Indiana
    ah, i think i get it now. thanks!
     
  6. oliebrice

    oliebrice

    Apr 7, 2003
    London, UK
    some people get very heated about wheter the same chord should be called sharp 4 or sharp 11. I've been told by different workshop teachers than each is the only possible accurate description!
     
  7. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    It's #4, dammit! #4, I say!! :mad: :mad: :mad:
     
  8. Tbeers

    Tbeers

    Mar 27, 2005
    Chicago, IL
    I dunno.. I always favored #11.
     
  9. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    That's only in an E-gads or a D-molished.
     
  10. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY

    Don't forget B-SQUARE or C-SECTION. :eyebrow:


    Seriously, I think the differences in notation reflect whether the chord symbol is being used to reflect a harmonic or melodic emphasis. To denote harmonic emphasis, the extension way of writing it makes more sense, as those notes do tend to sound better when placed above the guide tones. For melody, it makes more sense to me to use the version that's all within the octave, which makes it easier to see how the color tones in question fit into a melodic line. I teach both, but use the second type more often (except in the case of 9th alterations, which are always notated as 9th alterations).
     
  11. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    I'm pretty sure the C-section has a #7 in it.
     
  12. oliebrice

    oliebrice

    Apr 7, 2003
    London, UK
    that makes sense, I'd never thought of it that way...
     
  13. TroyK

    TroyK Moderator Staff Member

    Mar 14, 2003
    Seattle, WA
    Get thee to a piano. It will all become clear....er
     
  14. My wife had two C-sections. One girl, one boy.
     
  15. ryco

    ryco

    Apr 24, 2005
    97465
    I was under the impression if a chord is called extended, it has to contain a seventh.
     
  16. HaVIC5

    HaVIC5

    Aug 22, 2003
    Brooklyn, NYC
    The real reason why they are called 9th's 11th's and 13th's isn't because they're voiced higher. They can be voiced below the octave and still be called 9th's 11th's and 13th's. The reason why they aren't called 2nd's and whatever is because of the principles of building chords. Chords are built by stacking 3rds. You start with the 1, stack a third on that and its 1 3. Stack another 3rd and you have a major triad. Stack another 3rd and you have 1 3 5 7 - some kind of seventh chord. You keep on stacking the thirds and you get the extensions.
     
  17. Aaron Saunders

    Aaron Saunders

    Apr 27, 2002
    Ontario
    While theoretically this does match up, IME 9/11/13 chords are put their specifically to have more colour on the top -- composer's intent and such. If you give a pianist a sheet with a sus2 chord in one place and a 9 chord in another, you're going to get a vastly different sound, because that piano player is (like any reasoning person) going to know the clear difference and voice them appropriately.
     
  18. jallenbass

    jallenbass Supporting Member Commercial User

    May 17, 2005
    Bend, Oregon
    Your two examples will sound different not because of voicing but because those are two different chords. In a Csus2 the 3rd is replaced by the 2nd degree making it neither major or minor. A C9 is major in quality.