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eye candy for the scroll lover: Frenz/CT

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by JSPguitars, Jan 9, 2005.


  1. JSPguitars

    JSPguitars

    Jan 12, 2004
    Grass Valley
  2. JTGale

    JTGale

    Oct 26, 2004
    Hummelstown, PA
    Check out the first lam on the wings -- it's a wedge. Interesting idea on how to sweep it back before carving. Do you think it is rounded on the back and front then, ala Spector? Or is the joint a semi-hard edge? Just wondering ...
     
  3. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    Interesting about the wedge. How would you glue that? I mean how would you clamp it without it slipping........t
     
  4. JTGale

    JTGale

    Oct 26, 2004
    Hummelstown, PA
    I suppose you could make a wedge-shaped jig that would exert both downward pressure while shoring up the edges tight. Would be a good trick, though. And I am thinking a really big jig. The one I have in mind would be pulled together with threaded rod and wingnuts, have metal facing plates with wax paper in between. Make sense?
     
  5. JSPguitars

    JSPguitars

    Jan 12, 2004
    Grass Valley
    I'm having trouble picturing the jig, but that's nothing new. The reason I thought it was interesting was because of those first couple wedge laminates off the neck piece......original idea! He (the luthier) doesn't appear to have a website so no way to contact and ask him either, unless the seller "harrybass" is the luthier.
     
  6. Scott French

    Scott French Dude Supporting Member

    May 12, 2004
    Grass Valley, CA
    You could pin/dowel the laminates or just butt them up to something and clamp to that so the wedge has nowhere to go.
     
  7. Tim__x

    Tim__x

    Aug 13, 2002
    Alberta, Canada
    A little flashy for my tastes, but I must say, the fretboard is striking.
     
  8. It simply slays me that all of that work and planning is put into a construction like that and the final piece was to put that mismatched coverplate on the back. The builder may not call it mismatched but to anyone's eye, it's totally out of phase with it's background.

    This is what I call a fatal flaw in this bass. IMO a "fatal flaw" is the one single stand out, either design or fab, aberration that is so out of place in relation to the rest of the build as to raise a question about the builders real eye towards detail. As in "how in the world doesn't he see that?"

    My goal is to avoid these types of visual train wrecks. :scowl:
     
  9. for glueing the wedge, I've done some of this style of glueing before (not on an instrument, though). I combine the weight idea with dowels (or small pilot staples). works great
     
  10. I like the fretboard and mandolin style headstock a lot
     
  11. budman

    budman Commercial User

    Oct 7, 2004
    Houston, TX
    Formerly the owner/builder of LeCompte Electric Bass

    My guess is the builder would have ripped the wedge pieces on a table saw then used the waste strip as a clamping face on the inside of his bar clamps keeping the clamps square. Or maybe he glued it up square and then ripped the wedge shape on a table saw. Then as he added more strips he continued to use the waste strip to keep the clamps square. He might have alernated the clamps over and under to keep from pulling the added strips in one direction.
     
  12. Yeah Bob makes some wonderful basses, I know I own 3.
    And no he doesn't have a web page and takes forever to answer e-mail but he could be contacted. And as far as the wedge goes that should be quite simple, glue lams solid and square, take to jointer at about 5%, then carve when assembled. :)
    Dirk
     
  13. JTGale

    JTGale

    Oct 26, 2004
    Hummelstown, PA
    But the issue is not how to angle the wedge (i.e. table saw, jointer, etc.). That should be a simple task. The problem is when you want to glue the wings to the body. Exerting the right amount of pressure at an angle is difficult.

    Here is an idea I whipped up based on my post above. The plates are metal, bent at the precise angle that the wedge is cut. The wings and the body are placed in the jig, the wingnuts tightened to hold the items in place, then the c-clamps are tightened to exert the semi-downwards pressure that will give you a solid glue joint. Like I said before, big and clunky, but I think it would work. Then, after it is glued up, you could shape the body to taste.
     

    Attached Files:

  14. teacherguy

    teacherguy

    Feb 21, 2004
    Cincinnati, OH
    I can't tell from the the photos fro sure, but is the bridge recessed into the body? It would have to be on a curve body like that, right? (like a Spector?)


    Jon
     
  15. When I rebuilt a bass and glued new wings on at 5 degrees, I already had pickups routed so bar clamp inside the pickup cavity and one on the wood on the outside. Only took 3 clamps. It was a little tricky and wanted to slide up, but once I got one clamp nice and tight the rest were easy. I did each side at a time, and used gorilla glue which gets sticky pretty fast. Within and hour or so I was able to remove the clamps and do side number 2.
    Man that jig looks like it would be the stuff. Especially if doing it mutliple times. You must be an engineer. :)
    I don't think the bridge is recessed, at least on mine none of them are. All surface mount.
    Good luck,
    Dirk
     
  16. JTGale

    JTGale

    Oct 26, 2004
    Hummelstown, PA
    Speaking of gorilla glue, how is it to work with? I have never tried it but want to sometime. You say it gets tacky fast. How fast? Does it spread evenly and dry clear? And how is the longevity? Does it "wear" well, so to speak?

    And no, I am not an engineer. I once was, years ago. Now, I am just a designer. :)
     
  17. tjclem

    tjclem Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jun 6, 2004
    Central Florida
    Owner and builder Clementbass
    I used to use it. A Builder that works at Bass Central Grasshopper talked me out of it. If is gets on your hands you will have to wear it off :rolleyes: If you step in it barefoot and then step in sawdust TaDa instant shoes :rollno: ......t
     
  18. JTGale

    JTGale

    Oct 26, 2004
    Hummelstown, PA
    Yikes! :rollno: Think I might skip it, then.
     
  19. JSPguitars

    JSPguitars

    Jan 12, 2004
    Grass Valley
    Gorilla glue makes an awful, foamy mess that sux big time if it's in places you can't get too very easily. seems strong, just foamy-messy.
     
  20. JSPguitars

    JSPguitars

    Jan 12, 2004
    Grass Valley
    Hambone............I totally agree with what you said about the cavity cover. You'd think someone who took all the time to glue all those laminates together would do it right the first time.
    excluding the cavity cover, It's pretty to me. Kinda reminds me of a candycane or a lollipop and I just wanna eat it or something........... :meh: