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Fanned Fret Fretless?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by pierce, Sep 30, 2004.


  1. pierce

    pierce freethinker

    May 25, 2000
    San Francisco, Ca
  2. Anti_Wish

    Anti_Wish

    May 14, 2004
    Boston, Ma
    its got a fake fan fret inlay. if it were a fanned fret(less) the bridge would be angled so would the nut a la http://www.basscentral.com/2003/dingwall.shtml

    scroll down and youll see the fretlesses.
    i don't mean to spam by posting basscentral. it twas the most convenient.

    i think the thing is fake. for one he says warmouth twice. hello WARMOTH!!! NO U! and for two he says it has perfect intonation whereas if you were to play at the fretlines, it would not be right! its also funny that the alembic pre only has a volume and tone pot! ;) sound fishy to anyone else?
     
  3. pierce

    pierce freethinker

    May 25, 2000
    San Francisco, Ca

    thats what i was thinking...and, why do the "fanned" fret lines look all out of whack. :eyebrow: you would think they would be uniform. :p
     
  4. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    It's a fake. I don't even think that's a photograph.

    Anyway, excuse my hijack, but wouldn't it be challenging to play a true "fanned-fret" fretless with no fret lines? WHOA!
     
  5. geshel

    geshel

    Oct 2, 2001
    Seattle
    I wouldn't quite say it's a fake, just misguided. It's not supposed to be what most of us think of as a fanned-fret setup -- one with different scale-lengths per string. This is supposed to be some sort of intonation adjustment. Thing is, if you need that much adjustment, things are pretty screwed up to begin with! And anyway, your ear should always be the judge of how much adjustment is needed.
     
  6. Scott French

    Scott French Dude Supporting Member

    May 12, 2004
    Grass Valley, CA
    Don't think so fast everybody. I have no idea if this is legit or even licensed, but you don't have to have an angled bridge to use a Novax fanned fret neck.

    http://www.novaxguitars.com/Pages/novaxnex_bass_frame.html

    My question is this... do you have to pay the license fee to build a LINELESS fretless fan-fret instrument?


    [​IMG]
     
  7. geshel

    geshel

    Oct 2, 2001
    Seattle
    You do, however, have to have an angled nut*.

    Look at any Novax fretboard: the distance from the nut to the 1st fret is larger on the lowest strings than it is on the highest. This is just a fact of having a longer scale length on that string.

    The bass in this auction has a shorter nut-to-first-fret distance on the lowest string. It is in no way a Novax-style fanned-fretboard instrument.

    *note: well, the nut could be vertical, but the bridge would just have to be angled even more than usual, and it would not be very playable that way, I would think. Anyway, the above statement about the fret distances would still hold.
     
  8. Scott French

    Scott French Dude Supporting Member

    May 12, 2004
    Grass Valley, CA
    I didn't look to close or count frets but it could be a striaght nut with an angled zero fret. That's what I assumed anyway.
     

  9. Regardless of the technical aspects of the nut and bridge is the simple fact that these frets are not actually fanned properly - the first few frets are clearly not spaced correctly and it doesn't look like it would actually work the way a fanned neck should.
     
  10. LajoieT

    LajoieT I won't let your shadow be my shade...

    Oct 7, 2003
    Western Massachusetts
    Yea but if you look closely at that instrument you'll see that the bridge has been adjusted to make up for it not being angled, almost to it's extreem.

    [​IMG]

    The E string saddle is back about as far as it can go and the G String saddle is up about as far as it can go, which leaves VERY little room for intonation except for the A and D Srtings. This is not to say that it can't be done, it's Novax's patent and their bass, so I'm sure theirs is just fine.

    If I understand the principles behind the fanned frets also you can decide which fret should be the perpendicular fret (a properly thought out fanned fret has ONE location that is "not angled") and that is the ONLY place on the multiple scales that is perpendicular. I'm not sure if the bridge can be that point or not but if it can it would make the "fanned effect" at the nut EXTREEM (the fan effect gets greater the further away from the perpendicular point).

    [​IMG]

    This bass looks like the 20th (assuming that the first thing on the neck is a Zero Fret, which is the only shot this thing has of being a truely fanned fret instrument) fret is ALMOST perpendicular, which would make it impossible for the bridge to be as perpendicular as it is. Also If that is a Zero Fret, it seems out of whack with the pattern of the rest of the fan. All of the ones I've seen ALL of the frets look like if they were continued down would converge on a single point. That one is pointing too far off of that point.

    As for having to pay a license to do a lined fretless, I would think that ANY instrument made for sale would need to pay a license fee. That's the nature of trademarks. Even if I were to build one just for myself I would still probably contact Novax and pay whatever fee they thought was appropriate (I've heard they can be quite expensive for luthiers who only do a few, but give decent deals to people like Dingwall and Conklin who do quite a few) But I would assume that along with the license also comes the principles and specifications to properly make the Fanned Frets, which IMO, this bass is missing.
     
  11. This is total b.s. This is NOT a fanned-fretless bass. The angle is not even consistent (I mean, converging towards one single point, as LajoieT put it), just look at the three lowest fret lines.

    About the zero-fret hypothesis, I don't see why you'd put a ZERO FRET on a FRETLESS, and why you'd put it so far away from the nut. It is also clear that the strings sit on the nut, not on the first ("zero") fret.

    From what I see, the lines are strictly decorative, but they would confuse the hell out of the average fretless player. :spit:
     
  12. pilotjones

    pilotjones Supporting Member

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    1. The lines are not only not evenly fanned, some of them are WAY off.
    2. Neither the not nor the bridge saddles are angled, so there is no multiple scale length, so there is no "fanning."
    3. The fee is only $75, or $65 each for a run of ten or more, and only applies to items for sale in the US.
    4. Scott - if you read the patent, I think it consistently describes a system of laying out frets.
     
  13. Juneau

    Juneau

    Jul 15, 2004
    Dallas, TX.
    BTW, you dont have to have an angled bridge, but you do need at least 1"1/4 I think adjustment difference. And this is no Novax Fanned Fret anyhow hehe.
     
  14. Well from the looks of the bass and the Ad, this fanned fret inlay is just a sale gimmick. I think the person selling this knows its not multiscale insturment, but hey.... they gotta sell a fretless Attack bass.
    I have a Fanned fretless, you have to have the angled nut to ensure the multiscale, the bridge can be a standard one.
    As mentioned the Novax costs appear on their website and its not that bad, So if this person really wanted a fanned fretboard fretless, he could of done that, but it would have added another cost to an already inexpensive bass
    frank
     
  15. LajoieT

    LajoieT I won't let your shadow be my shade...

    Oct 7, 2003
    Western Massachusetts

    Sweet Pilot!!! Thanks for that link.
     
  16. pilotjones

    pilotjones Supporting Member

    Nov 8, 2001
    US-NY-NYC
    No problem.
     
  17. I've always noticed that lined fretlesses have pretty inaccurate intonation across the range of the neck. Maybe there is a way to work out the lines so that intonation is always about perfect.

    Of course, that is NOT the way... and in my case I avoid the problem by using a plain board.