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Father of the Electric Bass Guitar

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Headroom, Apr 17, 2006.


  1. Headroom

    Headroom

    Apr 5, 2002
  2. I think Leo Fender is best known not for inventing the electric bass guitar but mass producing it in a way that was affordable to everyone...but thats just what I've gotten from the story...
     
  3. MAJOR METAL

    MAJOR METAL The Beagle Father Supporting Member

    I think for alot of people Leo Fender will allways be the Father of the Electric Bass Guitar.
     
  4. Lazylion

    Lazylion Goin ahead on wit my bad self!

    Jan 25, 2006
    Frederick MD USA
    I like this part:

    "The first electric bass-viol is only four feet tall, instead of six. It could be made a lot smaller, but Tutmarc didn’t want to be too revolutionary right off the bat. Bass violinists are a conservative race, and have to be accustomed gradually to the idea, he says.”

    Tell that to Gene Simmons and the guy from GWAR!

    From now on, I'm claiming that I play the Electronic Bass Fiddle!
     
  5. BassChuck

    BassChuck Supporting Member

    Nov 15, 2005
    Cincinnati
    Interesting in all this to note that one of Leo Fender's first gigs was a road salesman and repairman for Rickenbacker. Although at that time all that Rickenbacker made was that 'frying pan' Hawaiian guitar.

    Still..... I think of Leo as 'The Man'.
     
  6. tplyons

    tplyons

    Apr 6, 2003
    Madison, NJ
    Leo was father of the first commercially successful bass guitar. The 937 Tutmarc made was a failure on the market.

    Too ahead of it's time I believe.
     
  7. Dan1099

    Dan1099 Dumbing My Process Down

    Aug 7, 2004
    Michigan
    Leo Fender is the father of the bass guitar in the same way that Henry Ford is the father of the automobile. They didn't invent the thing, but they made it practical, affordable, and desireable, and brought it out in numbers sufficient to "bring it to the masses."
     
  8. flatwoundfender

    flatwoundfender

    Feb 24, 2005
    And most people don't drive model T's but a whole lot of bassists still use fenders.
     
  9. Dan1099

    Dan1099 Dumbing My Process Down

    Aug 7, 2004
    Michigan
    Not many people use '51 style fenders, phenolic bridge and all, anymore, either. ;)
     
  10. flatwoundfender

    flatwoundfender

    Feb 24, 2005
    No, but after the split pickup in the late 50's there have been little to no changes to the pbass design, (graphite rods, and s1 are about it) How many people do you see still driving cars ford made 10 years after the model t, not to many model a's around.
     
  11. whitedk57

    whitedk57

    May 5, 2005
    Franklin, NC
    Your analogy of the bass to a car is kinda like apples and oranges. The car has so many things that can be improved on while the bass is pretty simple in comparison. I would think that a bass is like the bicycle in that the overall design has not changed much over the years. Even today, bicycles usually just change in the componentry. The overall design remains constant.
     
  12. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member In Memoriam

    A lot of people drive Fords.....

    In fact I would think more people have driven a Ford car than played a Fender bass!! ;)
     
  13. Headroom

    Headroom

    Apr 5, 2002
    I'd agree that both Ford and Fender created products optimized for their manufacturability on a mass scale, and thus available to the consumer at an affordable price.

    And I'll concede that "father of" was an imprecise choice of words.
     
  14. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member In Memoriam

    Yeah - it's all about "critical mass", rather than being first with something.
     

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