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fender diasaster

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by nunk6, Aug 26, 2000.


  1. nunk6

    nunk6

    Jul 29, 2000
    hey i had a squire affinity P 4 string right; loved but its a "squire" so my band didn't like me playing it on stage, traded it in and spent some $$ for a MIM fender. that one blew; i mean i didn't see much of a difference between that and the squire, and i traded it in as soon as the new strings when flat ;)

    right then i traded in the fender and got another MIM but it was back when the fender's were about to become squires so it has squires series written on the end of the headstock plus it has a skunk stripe which my squire didn't have, i like it better without them.!!!!!!!and i picked up an envelope filter, digital delay and a pickguard plus the bass and didn't spend any cash just traded in the MIM fender the first one and my squire bronco which i aslo had!!!!!! got a deal see

    **but see my point is i think i'm going to trade this new one in and get like a squire again paint it up change the pick ups and pickgaurd and sand off the logo plus paint;

    WHAT NEW PICK UPS WOULD BE RECOMMENDED AND WHAT IS THE REAL DIFFERENCE BETWENN FENDER AND SQUIRE I CANT HEAR IT!!!!???????
     
  2. I don't think I'll address your basic question but do want to point out that you are jumping through hoops for bandmates that are seriously lacking in understanding just what music is about. It is NOT about what bass you play, it's logo, or how much you paid for it. It's about sound, vibe, soul, groove, and what it does for you and your audience. If you have (and it sounds like you did the first time!) the bass that does the job the way you envision it, then that's the bass you should play until your vision changes. And until your cohorts are willing to buy your equipment, they should stay out of your equipment choices.

    For your friends - tell them that there were certain years and versions of Squire basses that were more than comparable in value and tone to the same basses with Precision on the headstock. They don't know what they are talking about.

    About your bass purchasing - When you are dealing with the lower end of the economic scale in basses, you should play as many as you can get your hands on. The quality of tone and finish varies greatly and it is up to you not to buy a particular bass that doesn't have what you require in it.


    Sorry for the rant, but someone needed to say it.




     
  3. CamMcIntyre

    CamMcIntyre

    Jun 6, 2000
    USA
    Hey the skunk stripe you're talking about is there from when they put in the truss rod. And i beleive they do that on all the basses regardless of fingerboard type expect for the graphite necks since there isn't enough room. Since you're dealing with the MIM seris try out as many as you can some can be great basses others are better used as firewood. Theres what i think.
     
  4. gmstudio99

    gmstudio99

    Mar 11, 2000
    Cleveland, OH
    What Hambone said is 100% correct. If you're basing your instrument choices on what your bandmates think, get the ^&%* out of that band. Play what YOU like and what YOU think sounds good.

    I'd rather play with a cat that can groove on a Squier than some punkass that sucks but owns a Modulus (or whatever...)...your bass is YOUR instrument, not your band's.

    Technically, you're asking a pickup question, and I should move this to the pickup forum...but I'm not going to because you aren't going to buy a new bass and change it for those guys (I can't call them "friends" or even "bandmates" at this point.). Go get the Squier you know and love, get it back (or get another one), make it YOURS for YOU and play YOUR music on YOUR instrument.

    -GM, unusually riled up...
     
  5. nunk6

    nunk6

    Jul 29, 2000
    yea i think i'm going ot buy another squire and give it a beefed pickup system like EMG or even alembic aftersome saving
     
  6. Boplicity

    Boplicity Supporting Member

    If the bass player is cool, more specifically, plays cool, his choice of bass can seem cool to his fans. Look what Fieldy has done for Ibanez basses. Look what Flea did for Music Man basses at one time. And Jason Newsted for Sadowsky basses. Thank heavens Lars and James and Kirk didn't say to him, "Oh, that Sadowsky five string bass blows chunks. It looks like crap and the tone sux." Yet that's what your band members are doing to you.

    The goal is to play the bass you love and the day may come when new bass players will want to play YOUR bass, because you have made it cool. That is so much better than trying to find the bass some other bass player has popularized. You set the standard, in other words, and the public will think you are really hip because you have that special sound and they think you have such great taste and were on the forefront.

    Also, if your band does well and you are playing an off the beaten track bass, maybe you'll luck out big time and get an endorsement deal from that bass's manufacturer. (I know that is a pie in the sky scenario, but you never know.)

    Anyway, from my own personal experience I can say it is so much better to play the bass you are comfortable with and satisfied with. As for your band members, first they'll say it is your bass they don't like. Then they'll say it is your sound rig. Then they'll say it is your stage attire. Then they'll say you don't have enough tattoos or too many. Do you want to play in a band where the others tell you every note to play and every step to take? I don't think so.
    You are the bass player and only you should decided what bass you play.

    Jason Oldsted

     
  7. mayfairmistress

    mayfairmistress

    Aug 19, 2000
    i play a karera. ever heard of it? neither have i. the bass doesnt really matter as long as you break it in and make your own special sound with it. you have to pick one and get to know it, i think all this jumping around your doing is idiotic, especialy cause your not doing it for yourself.
     
  8. Deynn

    Deynn Moderator Emeritus

    Aug 9, 2000
    Iowa
    You've been given some excellent advice here. Unfortuantely,
    there IS gear snobbery out there, but try and not let it influence your choice of instrument.
     
  9. ross

    ross Guest

    Mar 17, 2000
    i heard of that brand
     
  10. mayfairmistress

    mayfairmistress

    Aug 19, 2000
    hey, i was making a point.
     
  11. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that the only real difference between a Fender and a Squier is the location of the factory. I'm certain that Squier's are just Fender basses assembled in Korea... there actually is no difference between the two (in fact if you buy a Squier you have the benefit of having both logos on your headstock!)
     
  12. RS

    RS

    Aug 27, 2000
    Cleveland, OH
    Yeah, but if Metallica told Newstead to get rid of the Sadowskys and play a crappy Rogue bass, he would do it in a heartbeat because he is the band's bee-itch.
    Metallica Blows!
     
  13. old_skool

    old_skool

    Aug 17, 2000
    Milwaukee, WI
    is it true what Gimli said cause i have a squire and im always hearing how they are such **** and i really like that bass but i always end up thinking squire is just a piece of crap fender rip off
     
  14. Yes Old Skool they are a Fender product. The correct name of the bass is a Fender Squire _______ (Precision, Jazz etc.)
     
  15. MJB

    MJB

    Mar 17, 2000
    OK gang it's Squier not Squire. Originally they were a strings company and Squier was the man's last name. Squier is to Fender as Epiphone is to Gibson. They are a line of instruments designed to be affordable entry level guitars and basses. That doesn't mean that they're crap or useless and it also doesn't mean that they are the best. Think of it as Chevy, Buick, Cadillac. They're all General Motors cars, they'll all get you to where you going but they are not the same. It saddens me to see people put off by a name on a headstock, what other people say, etc. etc. If YOU like the bass and it suits YOUR budget and needs then what's the problem? I own an MIJ Fender bass, an MIK DeArmond bass, an MIC Squier Stratocaster and an MIM Fender Telecaster. As far as I'm concerned they are all fine instruments. Someday I hope to own a Pedulla just as some Chevy drivers hope to own a Cadillac someday. Play what you like and can afford, the musician is much more important than the gear anyway. Above all have fun.
     
  16. nunk6

    nunk6

    Jul 29, 2000
    hey yea i'm gonna go get myself a squire rock out maybe be bust it and by another who knows they dont sound bad metallica suck? no way hehehe.....
     
  17. gmstudio99

    gmstudio99

    Mar 11, 2000
    Cleveland, OH

    ??


    -GM
     
  18. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member



    I think this is one of those cases which I have highlighted in "General Instruction", where the posts have become incomprehensible due to the way they have been expressed. I'm still not sure what the original post is trying to say - I know what people have picked up on, but every time I look back, I'm not sure that is actually being said. I still have no idea what that second sentence (paragraph!) actually means.
     
  19. gmstudio99

    gmstudio99

    Mar 11, 2000
    Cleveland, OH
    Maybe it helps if you rap it out loud...

    :D


    -GM
     
  20. Squier Affinity series basses and guitars are Chinese made. Quality, like all bottom end gear, is highly variable. Some really good wood goes into some instruments, other instruments are made with what's left. At that price, you take pot luck. The MIM basses I have seen have somewhat better hardware than the affinity basses, but are not really bettwr made.

    When Squier was first used ans a brand name by Fender, it was used for Japanese made guitars and basses for the non-US market. Frequently, an early 80s MIJ Squier and MIJ Fender are EXACTLY the same thing, only for different markets. I had a 1982 MIJ P bass that was identical in every way to a MIJ Fender of that era.

    Current Squiers are cheap stuff. You buy cheap stuff, you take the risk. I have seen direly awful MIM jazz basses, but others, including, I believe, our esteemed moderator, have MIMs which are really good (or so they say!).

    If you want a consistent guarantee of quality, you got to pay.