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Fender Jazz Deluxe or Peavey Cirrus

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by pourboy, Jan 8, 2002.


  1. pourboy

    pourboy

    Mar 11, 2001
    Boston, Mass.
    I've narrowed my search for a new bass down to one of these two and was looking for any opinions from people who own or use these basses.
    Pros or cons, versatility, etc.
    thanks
     
  2. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Commercial User

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    Boom Bass Cabinets, DR strings
    What's your budget? I have both.
     
  3. Ryan L.

    Ryan L. Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Aug 7, 2000
    West Fargo, ND
    I own a Peavey Cirrus 5, and have played many Fender Jazz basses.

    I personally would recommend the Cirrus over the Jazz, but of course, I am probably a bit biased.

    With the Cirrus, you get your choice of woods, each providing a different tone, so try them all out to find which one gets "your" sound the best. You also get neck-thru body construction, 35" scale, and some great electronics. They balance well, both sitting and standing, and are fairly light weight. The neck is extremely comfortable and fast, for me anyway. Straplocks come standard, as does the hard case. (I believe the Fender comes with a case also, though) With a little knob turning, I can nail about any tone I could ever need with the bass, and that is without doing anything to the amp.

    With the Fender Jazz, you get, well, a Fender Jazz. And that is not at all a bad thing. They are very nice basses, just not for me. Being I don't own one, I am not going to say much about them.

    So, if it were up to me, which it is not, I would go buy the Cirrus. In my opinion, it is a much better bass for the money.

    Ryan
     
  4. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    I'll vote for the Cirrus, between those two.

    But which one sounds and feels right to you?
     
  5. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Commercial User

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    Boom Bass Cabinets, DR strings
    It all depends on what sound you're after and how much you want to spend. There's a wide range of Jazz Deluxes, from MIM's to the FMT's... and a wide price range to go with it. Fender has taken the Jazz to another level with the FMT.

    The Cirrus are excellent basses that have their own sound, much like a Ken Smith has it's own sound. If you like that sound, it's perfect.
     
  6. uglybassplayer

    uglybassplayer

    Aug 24, 2001
    New Jersey
    Pourboy,

    Have you had a chance to play both basses? As others have said already, both have a very different feel. My guess is that if one feels "right" to you, the other one won't. Personally, I love every thing about my Redwood Cirrus, but then again, I've never really cared for the Jazz (even though I owned one for several years). The tone was great, just never loved the way it felt.

    - Frank.
     
  7. rickreyn

    rickreyn

    Jun 16, 2000
    Lutz, Florida
    but I agree that you would want to play both. I am very satisfied with the sound of my Cirrus, and it is appreciated by all in the band. It's a great guitar for the money and extremely versatile. I have also been impressed with the American Jazz. I can't see you going wrong either way, but don't be afraid to get the Peavey. Be warned that many will walk up to you and say, "...a Peavey!"
     
  8. uglybassplayer

    uglybassplayer

    Aug 24, 2001
    New Jersey
    And when they do, just send them over here to TalkBass, and we'll set 'em straight!
     
  9. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    I have been told (while playing on someone else's project) "Bring the Fender". I have never been asked to bring a Peavey. Not that they (Peavey) aren't good basses, it is just that some (many) people want that sound (Fender) on their work. There is not a style that a Fender won't cover well; and if you plan to do studio work or play on other's projects, then (in my experience) a Fender is a must-have.
     
  10. rickreyn

    rickreyn

    Jun 16, 2000
    Lutz, Florida
    True. I would think that most studios have a Fender laying around though. Hearing what I hear flat through the headphones from the Cirrus, I would think that the someone elses would want to experiment. All that said, the safe bet is the Fender, but only if it is American made.
     
  11. There are two Cirrus's on sale on Ebay - new I think. They are pretty nice looking...
     
  12. uglybassplayer

    uglybassplayer

    Aug 24, 2001
    New Jersey
    For God's sake, the boy already has a P-Bass listed in his profile, man doesn't live on Fender alone? :D

    Seriously, your point is well taken, but not everyone's goal in life is to be a session musician. Some of us just enjoy playing music (that, and finding that elusive "perfect" instrument)
    Ok, I'm probably in the minority here, so I'd better suit up and put on my flame reflecting sunglasses :cool: ... I'm well aware of the role both the P-Bass and Jazz have played in most (if not all) styles of music, but c'mon a good part of that was because 20, 30 years ago, there were'nt too many other choices out there. Plus (and you said it yourself), a lot of it was driven by producers (who tried to dictate everyone's sound) and sound engineers (who couldn't be bothered to work with instruments they weren't familiar with). Should it really be our intention to sound just like everyone else? If it is, let's get started, clone Carol Kaye or Chuck Rainey, and the rest of us can just put our instruments away and go home.

    Again, don't get me wrong. I owned both a P and a J bass for a number of years (didn't everyone?). I should have kept them for collector's reasons. But the truth is, once I got the Ric I all but stopped playing them, and none of these basses compared (at least in terms of "feel") to my Cirrus (every time I say that I have to pinch myself cause I don't believe it myself). And it doesn't bother me in the least that I'll never get a call to play on someone's album. It's not why I started playing in the first place. Of course, to each his/her own.

    Peace,

    - Frank.
     
  13. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    He also already has a Peavey listed.

    Which is why I said "if you plan to"...

    No, the intention should be to provide the service that someone is paying you for.

    It's not why I started either, but since it is my only income, I take those jobs and I enjoy it too. It's more fun than pumping gas, digging ditches, etc...
     
  14. uglybassplayer

    uglybassplayer

    Aug 24, 2001
    New Jersey
    What about other basses? I'm guessing that there aren't too many calls for say, a Ken Smith, or Lakland, or MTD or Zon. Should we discount them as well :eek: ?

    Hey, anyone know if hired hands who play other instruments go through the same thing?

    Guitarists: What's with the PRS? We said bring the Les Paul. :mad:

    Drummers: Hate to break the news to ya pal, but you might as well start breaking down that TAMA, we're looking for a "DW" sound. :(
     
  15. I own a JD and a Cirrus (and a Lakland). Different tools for different jobs.

    allan
     
  16. rickreyn

    rickreyn

    Jun 16, 2000
    Lutz, Florida
    I remember reading about Laboriel. He picked the guitar he wanted to play based on his role in the song. Of course, he is who he is. I also remember that he said the engineer's favorite was the Yamaha TRB5P.