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Fender MiM Fretless Jazz Bass Opinion??? (for new player)

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by tpowered, Oct 22, 2009.


  1. tpowered

    tpowered

    Oct 20, 2009
    I just saw this on craigslist for $275 and I was just wondering if this would be a good bass to use to get better on? ( I am prettyy new at playing bass except for preforming a song for church on a Fender Standard Jazz Bass = first time playing bass) for the price it also includes a gig bag which is pretty awesome!

    Thanks for the help in advance :)
     

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  2. Bryan R. Tyler

    Bryan R. Tyler TalkBass: Usurping My Practice Time Since 2002 Staff Member Administrator Gold Supporting Member

    May 3, 2002
    Connecticut
    It would be a very good starter bass.....so long as you want to get really into fretless playing. I always suggest starting with the type of bass you want to end up playing in the future (whether it be fretless, 6-string, etc.) as it will acclimate you more quickly to the instrument and allow you to avoid the uncomfortable transition you'll make when trying to switch to that instrument in the future. That said, it will likely be quite a bit more difficult to start on a fretless, particularly if you haven't developed an ear for pitch. So if you don't plan on playing fretless pretty heavily in the future, I'd stick with a fretted to begin with.
     
  3. René_Julien

    René_Julien

    Jun 26, 2008
    Belgium
    Okay, you want opinions on a MIM fretless jazz.

    I don't like it. I had one.
    A very dull and sterile fretless bass standard, unless you plan on modifying it.
    I never did modify mine, I stopped using it before I discovered TalkBass.
    I guess with other pickups, strings and bridge I could have enjoyed the fretless jazz I had.
    (I played a Squier VM fretless jazz recently which I thought was better than the stock MIM I had.)

    I'm an exclusive fretless player, I own other fretless now wich are more comfortable and sound better. Although granted: they are a lot more expensive than a MIM Jazz.

    This is my opinion. I'm sure a lot of people on this forum own a bass like this and enjoy it. (And probably play circles around me.)


    Now, for the price it is a good deal. I'm actually surprised it goes that cheap.
    Mine (2003 in excellent condition) went for 425€ last year.



    I agree with Bryan.

    If you are sure know you want to play fretless mostly, go with a fretless to learn on as soon as possible.
    But if you just are interested in this bass just because of the good price, then think about it.
    Would you rather have a fretted? 5-string? 6-string? Modern bass? ...


    In the end: your decision... should not take in account my opinion. ;)


    Good luck. :)
     
  4. Rudyboy98

    Rudyboy98

    Jan 25, 2008
    South Bay, CA
    Hi!

    Try out a few basses first to be absolutely sure you know what sound you are looking for and what bass feels the best in your hands.

    Just my .02

    :D
     
  5. René_Julien

    René_Julien

    Jun 26, 2008
    Belgium
    depends on the definition of the word troll...


    eitherway, goodbye
    people that don't follow TB rule #1 wont last long on here
     
  6. Subscript

    Subscript Supporting Member

    Oct 29, 2006
    Canada
    My suggestion is NOT to start with a fretless bass. A fretted bass is much easier to play and is much better for getting down the basics.
     
  7. René_Julien

    René_Julien

    Jun 26, 2008
    Belgium
    I have to disagree with this... in some context.

    Off course you are right, it's easier to start especially for the basics.

    But I see no reason why people couldn't start out on a fretless.
    Maybe a bit harder in the beginning, but you'll have a leg up if fretless playing will be your main thing.

    And that is for everyone to decide for themself. :)


    I play fretless for so long that I have problems when playing a fretted now.
    Fretless is not that much harder IMO. It depends on much much practice time you invest in it.

    IMO and IME ;)
     
  8. Darkstrike

    Darkstrike Return Of The King!

    Sep 14, 2007
    If you can find one of these Squier Fretles basses,

    http://bass-guitars.musiciansfriend...intage-Modified-Fretless-Jazz-Bass?sku=519637

    second hand, it'd be cheaper, and overall, a better bass for your money.

    I owned both at the same time, and while the MIM was a fine instrument, the Squier is far nicer than the price lets on.


    Depends on the tone you're after too, if you want a darker, thumpier tone, the MIM is great, but the Squier has a naturally brighter tone, which most fretless players are after.
     
  9. fightthepower

    fightthepower

    Jan 7, 2008
    San Diego
    I agree with Rene Julian to a point, though if I were in the OP's shoes, I'd probably start with a fretted 4 or 5 string, and move to fretless once I've learned the basics and start to get the muscle memory (therefor making the transition to fretless a bit easier should he later decide to go that route). A big YMMV though.. its all about what your goals and aspirations are, and how dedicated you are to achieving them-- if the drive and work ethic is strong enough, then I think a fretless would be a fine instrument to start out on.
     
  10. I played one last year,
    The bass was nice, but the action was far too high, and i didnt really like the sound of the bass. I was slightly dissapointed and it put me off of fretless basses.
    Im looking at investing in the squier, so +1 to that!
     
  11. René_Julien

    René_Julien

    Jun 26, 2008
    Belgium
    Yes, a big YMMV. :)

    I started out playing fretted. A year later I discovered fretless and never looked back.
    Maybe I had a leg up by playing fretted for a year, but when I look back at it it doesn't seem to have made a difference.

    IME, there is other muscle memory between the two.
    Once I got around quite good on the fretless, when I occasionally picked up a fretted afterwards I played like an absolute newbie on it.
    I made such beginner mistakes as fretbuzz, sloppy transitions,...
    We've all been there, we take that for granted now.
    Picking up any bass guitar type of playing isn't easy.


    And my view on it, if you start out on fretless, your fingers have no clue what frets are. So you wont miss them.
    Different if you are going from fretted to fretless. :)


    I agree though it's not an obvious instrument to start on, a fretless bass. Unless you are really sure that fretless is going to be very useful to you.

    And don't get me wrong, if you start out on fretless, you don't easily can switch to a fretted.
    Then you have to learn your way around frets like every beginner.
     
  12. Darkstrike

    Darkstrike Return Of The King!

    Sep 14, 2007
    Meh, if he wants to start fretless, go for it.


    Beginners don't start with fretted violins(I've only seen one, ever), or cellos, or upright basses, why should this be any different?
     
  13. René_Julien

    René_Julien

    Jun 26, 2008
    Belgium
    That's my philosophy too. :)

    I regret though that I never had the chance to learn violin as a child.
    Maybe that's why I'm so addicted to fretless bass. :)
     
  14. Darkstrike

    Darkstrike Return Of The King!

    Sep 14, 2007
    Yeah, same here, I'd really love to be able to throw out a few fiddle tunes, even tuned my fretless GDAE for a while!:D

    I still want to learn, but can't bring myslef to, because they sound so dreadful, if you don't know how to play one.:meh:
     
  15. phxlbrmpf

    phxlbrmpf

    Dec 27, 2002
    Germany
    I really wouldn't jump to fretless so early if you're planning on playing in a band immediately. If you haven't developed an ear for intonation yet, the entire band will end up sounding pretty bad because many of the notes you're playing will most likely be out of tune, even if you're using a lined fretless. I also remember that when I started out, I hadn't really developed an ear for low notes yet and the low notes on the E string sounded almost the same to me. Add that to the fact that you also have to be able to intonate properly and things will become even more difficult.

    Playing fretless is one thing but playing fretless in a band is another. Yeah, I know there's the people don't start on fretted violins argument but there's a reason why they usually spend years woodshedding before they play in their first orchestra.
     
  16. john turner

    john turner You don't want to do that. Trust me. Staff Member

    Mar 14, 2000
    atlanta ga
    if someone's being a troll, don't quote them and post about it, please just report the post and move on.

    also, don't discuss it in the forums, please. i've had to cleam up more from the "neighborhood watch" than i did from the troll.

    sheesh. :eyebrow:
     

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