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Fender new AVRI 74 Jazz bridge issues/question

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Britbonic, Nov 4, 2013.


  1. Britbonic

    Britbonic Supporting Member

    Jun 20, 2002
    San Francisco, CA
    I just got a new AVRI 74 Jazz for a crazy deal at GC last week. Overall I really like this bass, especially the U shaped neck and pickups. However, ran into a slight problem with the bridge.

    I went through a full set-up after I got the bass. It wasn't too bad stock but had more relief and higher action that I like. I tweaked the truss rod and got the neck nice nice and straight. However when adjusting saddle heights, found that saddles for both the E and G strings bottom out! Screws are loose in the saddles.

    Most of my other basses have older style vintage threaded saddles. I have to say I've always found these very easy to work with and adjust. One of things I noticed is that the mounting plate is thicker on the 70s style than the 60's style so that explains the bridge saddles bottoming out. The other thing is that the adjustment screws are very loose in the slots and the saddles themselves move very easily. This is my first experience with this is design and IMO its highly inferior to the older vintage style or newer bridges.

    I don't really want to put a replacement bridge on a brand new bass so questions:

    1. How to deal with the issue of saddles bottoming out? I don't want to shim the neck or swap out the bridge.

    2. How do you get the screws from moving around? Seems like they would vibrate out over time and of course affect action.

    3. How do you keep the bridge pieces stable? Right now there's lots of side to side movement.

    All that aside I'm really digging this bass.
     
  2. Easy. Just shim the neck. If you're sure the neck has proper relief, that's the thing to do.
     
  3. Britbonic

    Britbonic Supporting Member

    Jun 20, 2002
    San Francisco, CA
    Yeah, don't really want to do that though on a brand new bass that is otherwise set up fine.
     
  4. landau roof

    landau roof Reupholstered User

    Jul 29, 2010
    Downstate CA
    No way to get over geometry. You gotta shim it.
     
  5. FunkHead

    FunkHead Supporting Member

    Mar 10, 2007
    Yep. Shim or go a tiny bit flatter with the truss rod and hope you can raise the saddles up again.
     
  6. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars

    Other than shimming the neck, you could file the bottom of the saddle making them shorter.
     
  7. Sure but shimming is easier, really. And with it comes the advantage of greater break angle over the saddles, which will make the strings mash them down more firmly helping to prevent them sliding around and other nonsense.
     
  8. pacojas

    pacojas "FYYA BUN"

    Oct 11, 2009
    MEXICANADAMERICA
    +1

    i had awesome success with a file and a shim!:)
     
  9. narud

    narud Supporting Member

    Mar 15, 2001
    santa maria,california
    my 62 slab jazz has a factory shim. its not the end of the world.
     
  10. narud

    narud Supporting Member

    Mar 15, 2001
    santa maria,california
    or get a 75ri instead and use the microtilt!
     
  11. Britbonic

    Britbonic Supporting Member

    Jun 20, 2002
    San Francisco, CA
    Fretboard is about as flat as it will go without buzzing on upper frets. It's well below the .014 factory spec, probably closer to .06 or .08. IMO, this is a really good thing. Means frets are pretty level and neck is solid.

    Understand shim is not that big a deal. I used them in the past and could very well be one in there now. Was hoping for a solution with a thinner bridge plate or swapping in different saddles.
     
  12. sounds like it isn't setup fine at all.
     
  13. Britbonic

    Britbonic Supporting Member

    Jun 20, 2002
    San Francisco, CA
    Not sure what you mean. At the moment, the setup is really nice. Action is low, no buzzing, intonation is perfect. I could probably drop the E and G a little more if the saddles weren't bottoming out. Not a huge deal, but I'd like to have the option.

    Additionally, the height adjustment screws are loose and can be hand turned which means that saddle heights could easily change.

    I have 62 and 57 RI basses with the older style vintage bridge that have none of these problems. Screws are snug and stay put, plenty of room to get the action as low as I want. Neither have shimes in the neck pocket.
     
  14. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    I agree, but the OP said he didn't want to shim it


    What saddles are on it now? A set of threaded saddles may be what you are looking for.
     
  15. JLS

    JLS

    Sep 12, 2008
    Emeryville, Ca
    I setup & repair guitars & basses
    Why are you hoping for a more expensive solution?
     
  16. JLS

    JLS

    Sep 12, 2008
    Emeryville, Ca
    I setup & repair guitars & basses
    Why?
     
  17. Britbonic

    Britbonic Supporting Member

    Jun 20, 2002
    San Francisco, CA
    Actually, was thinking that might be best to just buy the whole vintage bridge assembly! The older style threaded ones also have a thinner bridge plate (part that attaches to the body) than the one that came with it which could solve the saddle bottoming out problem.

    The current saddles are the chrome barrel style single slot in the middle. I'm assuming these are period correct and that's why they're on the bass. I've seen these on countless Fender basses over the years but have never owned a bass with this bridge. I've only had experience with older vintage style and newer (as in recent Am Std) type, both are far superior IMO.
     
  18. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars

    I would just buy the threaded saddles for your current bridge then. They are smaller than the barrel saddles.
     
  19. landau roof

    landau roof Reupholstered User

    Jul 29, 2010
    Downstate CA
    I have never heard of the vintage bridge plate being thinner, but the threaded saddles can fix some of the other issues you're having.
     
  20. elBandito

    elBandito

    Dec 3, 2008
    Rotten Apple
    5 hole bridges Both genuine fender parts. Vintage plate is super thin.
     

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