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Fender Trussrod Nut

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Youngspanion, Jan 7, 2018.


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  1. Youngspanion

    Youngspanion Supporting Member

    Jun 16, 2003
    Staten Island, NY
    I was tooling around the Fender website, looking at all the new P basses and I noticed the truss rod nuts were NOT pictured. Some basses looked like they had the old style Phillips head screw at the neck heel. That is such a pain in the ass because you have to remove the neck to make the adjustments. I know some of them have the hex head socket that you can fit a allen wrench in there at the neck heel to make the adjustments without having to remove the neck. None seem to have a truss rod nut at the headstock end and only one has a wheel like the MusicMan bass.

    Maybe someone can tell me if I am wrong about the phillips head nut and its just not pictured or maybe, "yes, the neck needs to be removed on way too many Fender Precision basses."

    thank you and I apologize if this has been discussed and I could not find it in the search.
     
  2. Youngspanion

    Youngspanion Supporting Member

    Jun 16, 2003
    Staten Island, NY
    Well, upon further review of the specs section of each bass, It appears that the Nate Mendel P Bass has the 'vintage style butt adjust'. The Classic Series '50's Precision bass has a 'standard' truss rod. The American Pro Precision has, under the spec tab, has a truss rod nut spec of 3/16th hex adjustment and a spec tab of 'standard' under truss rod. It seems that Fender is not giving all the information or its an oversight. ALL the Specs for All the basses should have a spec tab for truss rod and truss rod nut.
     
    Doug Parent likes this.
  3. Warpeg

    Warpeg Supporting Member

    Jun 20, 2005
    Ohio
    Okay.
     
    mcnach and groooooove like this.
  4. It's not a Phillips head nut, it's meant to be turned with a flat head screw driver.
     
  5. The Fender site is full of errors, or at least has been, making it useless for me. You could ask here if there is a specific model that interests you.
     
    Youngspanion likes this.
  6. Youngspanion

    Youngspanion Supporting Member

    Jun 16, 2003
    Staten Island, NY
    Is it still called a truss rod nut?
     
  7. Vinnie Boombatz

    Vinnie Boombatz Banned

    May 26, 2010
    OP, What was your original question? What are you trying to figure out here in this thread?

    Most of the time you DO NOT need to remove the neck for most American and Mexican made Fenders that have the vintage-style/slotted truss rod adjustment at the heel of the neck. You WILL have to remove the pickguard, but you usually don't have to remove the neck. Because of the way CIJ/MIJ Fenders are made you actually do have to remove the neck because of the way the truss rod nut sits deeper in the neck pocket, but on any original 1970's Fenders I've owned, reissues/or inspired by original models (like the Nate Mendal P for example) and MIM Classic 50's Fenders all you need to do is remove the pickguard and use one of these and you're in business:

    FUERMss.
     
  8. Youngspanion

    Youngspanion Supporting Member

    Jun 16, 2003
    Staten Island, NY
    Thank you Vinny...thats exactly what I was looking for. I was looking at the Classic Series and the '50's basses and the first thing Im trying to do is figure out how to adjust the Truss. And I'm thinking of how much it sucked doing it to, guess what? My MIJ p bass I owned years back. So your information about the MIJ basses and your advice about the pickgard and the tool (paint can opener?) are exactly what I needed. LOL.
     
    Vinnie Boombatz likes this.
  9. Linnin

    Linnin

    Jul 19, 2012
    Linningrad, Earth
    ^^^This is correct^^^ It is a simple cross slotted nut. They can be adjusted without removal by popping the heal out of the neck pocket. It's a neat trick the pros use.
    Watch from the 4 minute mark
     
  10. Youngspanion

    Youngspanion Supporting Member

    Jun 16, 2003
    Staten Island, NY
    I saw that today too, Linnin.
     
    Linnin likes this.
  11. Youngspanion

    Youngspanion Supporting Member

    Jun 16, 2003
    Staten Island, NY
    Yea. Thats frustrating.
     
    Freightshaker likes this.
  12. Youngspanion

    Youngspanion Supporting Member

    Jun 16, 2003
    Staten Island, NY
    I was looking at the Classic Series '50's Precision BassĀ® Laquer.
     
  13. Vinnie Boombatz

    Vinnie Boombatz Banned

    May 26, 2010
    I'm not a "pro", but I like my paint can lid opener trick better than having to loosen the neck screws every time. Sure, it can be annoying removing all the pickguard screws each time, but I'd rather put the wear on those skews than always loosening and tightening the neck screws. Also, when you use the technique shown in the Fender video above, I bet over time, or if you're someone who really like to fine tune their relief, you run the risk of widening those holes in the neck when you loosen the screws and it's wobbling around. I'd rather deal with removing the pickguard. Way easier to deal with stripped out pickguard holes in the body than stripped out holes in the neck.
     
  14. Youngspanion

    Youngspanion Supporting Member

    Jun 16, 2003
    Staten Island, NY
    Me too. The fact that I'd have to loosen the neck screws at all was bothering me but it is still better then actually taking the neck off completely like I did with my Crafted in Japan P bass that I did once own.
     
  15. Linnin

    Linnin

    Jul 19, 2012
    Linningrad, Earth
    I've been doing it that way since I got my first left handed Precision in 1976. After 41 years there's no widening of holes or wobbling around. Of course I'm not a klutz and do it correctly.
    To each his own, but I'd rather do it the professional way.
     
  16. Vinnie Boombatz

    Vinnie Boombatz Banned

    May 26, 2010
    Yes, but you still have to slack the strings, loosen the neck screws, and then tighten the neck screws back up, tune back up to pitch, check the relief, and if you didnt get it exactly where you want it, go through the whole process again of loosening the strings, loosening the neck, adjusting the truss rod, tightening the end screws and tuning up again.

    With my method you adjust the truss rod without having to loosen the neck screws and it's done with the bass tuned to pitch, so it's a much easier, much more accurate and less labor-intensive. After I adjust the truss rod with my method I only put one or two pickguard screws back in for the next day or two to allow the neck to settle in case I need to made another fine adjustment. After I get it where I like it I'll then put the rest of the pickguard screws in.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2018
    mcnach likes this.
  17. telecopy

    telecopy

    Dec 6, 2009
    USA
    I loosen the strings a bit.. When I saw that part and heard the sound I thought, ouch. Not a big chore to loosen strings a few twists..
     
    Linnin likes this.
  18. Linnin

    Linnin

    Jul 19, 2012
    Linningrad, Earth
    That is because the bass was a Custom Shop '55 with super tight press fit neck pocket so the sound you heard was just wood-on-wood. No damage was done. On my '76 Precision the factory neck pocket fitment is so sloppy loose the neck just falls off if you take out the screws. :laugh: :roflmao: :laugh: Ahhhh those vintage CBS Fenders! :smug:
     
    telecopy likes this.
  19. telecopy

    telecopy

    Dec 6, 2009
    USA
    That sound was horrible. If I was doing that chore I would go sit down for a while and sulk before going back to it..
     
  20. Linnin

    Linnin

    Jul 19, 2012
    Linningrad, Earth
    An old carpenter's trick is to use a bar of soap to rub on the wood gliding surfaces of drawers so they move more smoothly. I'd do that to the foot of the neck and sides of the neck pocket. And yes, I loosen my strings too and slap a capo on the first fret to keep them on.
     
    Youngspanion and telecopy like this.

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