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finally shielded my L2000

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by deepestend, Nov 17, 2003.


  1. deepestend

    deepestend Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 21, 2003
    Brooklyn via Austin and NOLA
    Guitar/Bass Builder and Social Media at Sadowsky
    Been putting it off forever, but finally did it. Bought the copper adhesive tape from stewmac and finally had an hour to get it done.

    I have a 1985 L-2000 and it would buzz like crazy. To the point that I couldn't use it for recording sessions because the background noise was too distracting. Of course, it would pipe down if I touched the knobs or the strings, but that wasn't a real fix.

    It was a lot easier than I though. My big worry was that I'd have to pull everything out of the back of the bass. Luckily, there was already a copper plate right behind the knobs. All I had to do was line the edges of the cavity and the bottom of the cover. I also lined the pickup cavities and took off the bridge and lined that too. Took about an hour and now I have a dead silent bass. If you've been putting it off, just do it. Doesn't take that long and solves lots of problems.
     
  2. mgmadian

    mgmadian

    Feb 4, 2002
    Austin, TX
    If you still encounter any remaining shielding-related noise, you can also consider two additional things:
    1. Shield the inside of the pickup covers
    2. Replace the unshielded wiring with shielded wiring.

    I had my L-2500 shielded by a skilled guitar tech, he did this along with painting the cavity and placing copper foil on the control plate. It's nice to have a silent bass!

    Just for kicks... if you're in a modding frame of mind for your L-2000, I also had the tech install an "all-pots bypass" ability: when you pull up the volume knob, the signal from the pickups goes straight to the output jack (through the switches, but NOT through the volume, passive bass, or passive treble pots).

    I highly like this mod, and am surprised that manufacturers don't offer this out of the box. The result is dramatic: more highs, more lows, and a more clear and organic sound overall. Really "opens up" the sound of the L-2500, and would probably do the same for the L-2000 as they have the same electronics (when the pickups are in series mode, and the "all-pots-bypass" is engaged, you get a VERY defined/articulate sound). Very cool mod, IMHO.

    Greg
     
  3. deepestend

    deepestend Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 21, 2003
    Brooklyn via Austin and NOLA
    Guitar/Bass Builder and Social Media at Sadowsky
    You don't have any idea how to do this mod, do you?
     
  4. mgmadian

    mgmadian

    Feb 4, 2002
    Austin, TX
    Well... I'm not the best authority on how to actually do these things unfortunately, so I take my instruments in to a good guitar tech and have him do it. I do know what I like in terms of sound and tonal flexibility, and can judge the results, I'm just not the guy who knows how to make it happen!

    Sorry...
    Greg
     
  5. Im a sock

    Im a sock

    Dec 23, 2002
    Central MA
    That sounds like a cool mod for any bass. I wonder how complicated (or plausible) it would be for something with active electronics, such as my Peavey Cirrus.
     
  6. deepestend

    deepestend Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 21, 2003
    Brooklyn via Austin and NOLA
    Guitar/Bass Builder and Social Media at Sadowsky
  7. Philbiker

    Philbiker Pat's the best!

    Dec 28, 2000
    Northern Virginia, USA
    I strongly suspect that your Cirrus is very well shielded from the factory. Not all basses are.
     
  8. mgmadian

    mgmadian

    Feb 4, 2002
    Austin, TX
    Depends on the preamp/electronics design. There's no hard-and-fast distinction between 'active' and 'passive' basses, as the issue is selectively bypassing a couple of (passive) potentiometers that reside in the signal path.

    Some basses (e.g. G&L L-2500) have passive pots and an active preamp that follows them in-line... relatively easier to do (but don't ask me how :D). Other basses (e.g. Stingray) have every control implemented on a circuit board, including volume, so it's more difficult (some techs even told me it was "impossible") to figure out where to place any sort of bypass routing, and there may be other complicating factors (e.g. low-cut filters placed on the circuitboard that are activated in series mode, like on a Stingray 5).

    So... this is an area where a good tech is your best resource (or someone who's knowledgable wabout yoru Cirrus bass and how its electronics are implemented). Should be an easy question to anwer, though... this stuff is not completely transparent, but it's not rocket-science, either. :D
     
  9. I just did the exact same thing to my L2000 the other day. that copper tape is nice stuff, easy to work with. I did the sides of the control cavity and back of the plate, and the pickup cavities. didn't think about doint the bridge area. it is nice to have that great G&L tone without all the buzz.