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Fingering during string switches to same fret.

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by dudemeister, Mar 3, 2003.


  1. What is the "correct" fingering when switching between strings on the same fret.

    If I for instance want to switch from fret 5 on the D-string to fret 5 of the G-string I use two techniques depending on if I'm going up or down afterwards.

    G----5-3-
    D--5-----
    A--------
    E--------
    Fingering: ring-finger, pinky, index

    G----5-7-
    D--5-----
    A--------
    E--------
    Fingering: index(tip), index(joint), pinky

    In the second example I use a kind of barré that I don't think is considered good technique, but I use it to often...

    So how what is considered the best way of doing it?
     
  2. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    Whatever works...
    Barre-ing 4ths on a bass is not a bad thing(yer 2nd example).

    Your 1st example, ring-pinky-index, is a guitar technique...still vaid on an electric bass. ;)

    The angle of the wrist changes from Example "1" to Example "2"...some prefer to keep everything consistent; those guys will most likely opt for Example "2"(Barre-ing).
     
  3. Actually I'm not very consistent with example one either... Sometimes I also use barré with the pinky.

    How are jumps from brighter to lower strings done best? Same finger or change fingers?
     
  4. JimK

    JimK

    Dec 12, 1999
    That depends.
    Are you seeking/hearing something legato?
    ...or staccato?

    I guess my advice is to be flexible(while being somewhat consistent).
    ;)
     
  5. Amethska

    Amethska

    Jan 27, 2003
    NJ, USA
    I usually barre between strings... if I have absolutely no fingertip left to move it over to a low string, I'll just use whatever's next to it (since I primarily use ring and middle left hand fingers, that's not usually a problem)

    Technique? Bah... as long as there's no pain involved and it does the trick, it's good. :)
     
  6. Both staccato and legato... :)

    One of the reasons I brought this thread up was that I've heard that the technique considered "proper", is to only use the fingertips and at a straight angle according to the fretboard.
    Or maybe I'm just mixing this up with DB-technique...
     
  7. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    I wouldn't tend to go for the barre-ing, personally. It can make damping harder - and also, I find that when I follow through after the pluck, and my finger hits the string below - if I'm stopping that string with my fretting hand, I get a clack sound, which ain't too nice.
     
  8. so the norm is presumably barring for legato phrasing, individual fingers for staccato?

    I prefer not to barre to define the notes clearly (although I would in the 2nd example)-
    eg. in root-fifth-octave Motown-style phrases-
    the main riff of Led Zep's "good times bad times" is easier to play by barring, but the notes tend to blur into each other.
    I wonder how Jamerson and JPJ played such riffs- seeing as they used played-in flatwound strings with short decay, maybe they could get away with barring?
     
  9. I'm pretty sure Jamerson would've barred. I mean, he was a DB player all his life, and he usually only used the index, middle, and pinky fingers to fret. I'm not positive on any of this though.

    Personally, I barre when I switch between strings on the same fret. I barre especially on root-fifth-octave or root-fourths.
     
  10. this has got me thinking as to how different right hand techniques and string action would affect the choice of barring vs. individual fingers/the resulting sound.

    consider as an example the post-chorus root-fifth-octave riff in Black Sabbath's Paranoid, in which you wanted clear note separation;

    G-----5--------7
    D---5-------7---
    A-3------5------
    E----------------

    personally, I use index-middle-ring to fret each phrase (my covers band plays it at the faster Megadeth version tempo), but,


    if you were using your pinky to barre the fifth and octave, would you use you right hand fingers to mute the fifth , and if so, if you were using a pick, would you switch to individual fingers to fret?

    or, if you used your pinky to mute ie, lifting the tip slightly to mute the fifth, would a low action make this more difficult- to the point of switching to individual fingers on a bass that was set up this way?
     
  11. Fliptrique

    Fliptrique

    Jul 22, 2002
    Szczecin, Poland
    Endorsing Artist: Mayones Guitars&Basses, Taurus Amplification
    I would play it using index, middle and ring fingers. why?

    consider playing A on the e string right after the D on the g string. using barre on the d and g strings puts my index finger in a bit uncomfortable situation.
    but, again, playing "Fur Elise" I do use barre in this part:

    d ----7 (index finger) - 9 (pinky)
    a --7 (index finger)
    e 8- (middle finger)

    ...maybe i should avoid it... hmmm....
     
  12. How would you play Root,b7th,7th, octave?

    It is a pretty nasty jump to move your index finger from the root the the b7th
     
  13. the jump isn't that bad- i'd play it index, middle, ring.
    index, middle, ring, pinky feels awkward to me=possible hand problems.

    if I wanted to sustain the root, I might even use my thumb.
     
  14. Same here, I'd just barre the root and b7 with my index, middle for the 7th, then middle for octave.