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Fingering for 1st inversion triads in thumb position?

Discussion in 'Jazz Technique [DB]' started by urisala, Jan 31, 2017.


  1. urisala

    urisala

    Oct 2, 2013
    hi!
    What would be the correct fingering of the following:

    Quarter notes: root, fifth, third, back to root Of the Imaj7 chord (On strings I, II, III, I), then move up one scale degree and do R-5th-3rd-R of the II-7 chord, then III-7 chord...
    Lets say you begin on the first string D. You'd be playing D, A (under), (F#), D again ---- Then E, B, G, E... Etc. Would you use 1st finger or thumb to play the roots and fifths? Thumbing two adjacent strings seems a bit of a feat on my first try...

    Thanks for the help!!
    Uri
     
  2. Carl Hillman

    Carl Hillman

    Jan 1, 2010
    I don't know how "correct" it would be, but I'd play it all on the top two strings. 3,2,T,3 (shift up) 3,2,T,3
    ...and, I'd have to shed it in order to get it in tune.
     
    jallenbass likes this.
  3. Scott Lynch

    Scott Lynch Supporting Member

    Nov 27, 2002
    Delaware, USA
    That seems terribly awkward for me, personally, to finger properly, though your hand anatomy may be different and such a thing may not be an issue. Is that particular 'shape' being played out of necessity? If I had to, I'd play the D with 2, A with 1, and F# with 3 (or maybe 2), then back to 1 instead of 2 on D. Shifting up, 2 on E, 1 on B, 2 on G and back to 1 on E...

    Playing perfect fourths up in TP across two strings, I usually play the lower string with 1 and the higher string with 2. Rarely do I ever play P4ths across the string with the same finger, unless it's a staccato passage. The height of the strings that far up the fingerboard prohibits me from getting a good legato string crossing with only one finger.

    I'd much rather play the p4 on the G and D strings with 3 on D, T on A and 1 on F#. Sliding 3 up to E isn't a favorite choice for good intonation but it's better for me than trying to play across 3 strings.

    As always, YMMV etc.
     
  4. Les Fret

    Les Fret

    Sep 9, 2009
    You are right thumbing the 4th is a bit awkward especially higher on the neck

    I would do this one of these options:
    1) 3,2,1,3 (shift up) 3,2,T,3
    2) T,T,3,T (same position) 3,2,T,3
     
  5. urisala

    urisala

    Oct 2, 2013
    @Les Fret so in 1) you do 3 and 5 on the D string? I was trying to have one note per string
     
  6. Les Fret

    Les Fret

    Sep 9, 2009
    No. Option 1) is on three strings. One note per string.
     
  7. The easiest fingering for an inverted major triad is a chromatic position (spanning a minor third from t-3) for example: 3 plays the D harmonic on the G string then 3 again on the A harmonic on the D, thumb stops F#, still on D back to the high D with 3. If you practice the shape there with the two harmonics it is pretty easy to move anywhere.
     
  8. Don Kasper

    Don Kasper Supporting Member

    Sure -I'll throw some gas on this fire...
    The first 2 measures of the melody of T. Monks "Ask Me Now" is a great exercise for exploring Triads (and Octaves) in Thumb Position.
    See below.
    Note:
    1. the shape of the Cmaj triad across 3 strings. The first 2 notes - a Perfect 4th between 3/thumb, C - G. Very useful shape that most normal sized hands can and should execute.
    I don't use the Harmonic G under the thumb - I always stop that note - because sooner or later you'll need to play a Dbmaj triad...(Harmonics might be the Autotune equivalent of the DB!) Get used to stopping (accurately) with the thumb, as soon as possible - get that callous developed at a consistent location on your thumb.
    2. the shape of the first 3 notes of the Bbmaj triad across 3 strings - this is the easiest fingering for a first inversion major or minor triad (in TP), IMFO, - using 3/2 for the Perfect Fourth Bb-F, (NOT, 3/3...which is Clumsy esp. Legato/Arco.)
    photo(275).JPG
     
    Les Fret and Scott Lynch like this.
  9. Les Fret

    Les Fret

    Sep 9, 2009
    I agree. That's an easy shape. I saw a workshop of Eddie Gomez where he played a downward Cmaj7 arpeggio (b,g,e,c) or Cmaj with 3 T 3 T. So a shifting thumb (like a crab movement). He can do it very fast and execute a row of chords that way but it is tricky for the intonation. You also can do scales that way. It is good to have all the options and don't fixate on one fingering.

    I like to shift around more with the thumb instead of always playing it at the harmonic position. Also really high on the neck but also lower on the neck and on all strings.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2017
    Don Kasper likes this.

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