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Fingering these bars

Discussion in 'Orchestral Technique [DB]' started by Andy Mopley, Oct 5, 2017.


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  1. Andy Mopley

    Andy Mopley

    Sep 24, 2011
    Hi all

    The vomit exercise might came handy on this!!

    Anyway, just wondering how you would approach this (the eight notes tied) in terms of shifts, fingering and position(s) to play in? I am starting on the D string..

    Thank you
     

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  2. dderatz

    dderatz Supporting Member

    Sep 1, 2010
    InkedMus_LI.
     
  3. Andy Mopley

    Andy Mopley

    Sep 24, 2011
    That'll work. I was going up the G string on the third bar, but this looks easier to execute - thanks!
     
  4. Or, first 3 notes 4 0 1, next 1 2 4, next 4 2 1 then 1 0 4. Even at the beat-to-a-bar tempo there is time to finger in grabs using the first finger and pivot a lot. You are already on 4 for the top F sharp. It is always a pressure passage in the piece and I think that dederatz' approach may be harder to nail than using the G string approach. The last two bars before the repeat are also worth considering. 4 0 4, 1 2 4(pivot) and (up the D string) 1 4 (to cross over) 4. Compare the overall flow of each suggested fingering from position to position in each direction. Either can be made to work.
     
  5. salcott

    salcott Supporting Member

    Aug 22, 2007
    NYC, Inwood.
    4 0 1 makes the g sharp problematic.
     
    dderatz likes this.
  6. Ouch, my mistake. Either 4 1 2 (D and G strings ) or the 1 2 4 (D string) depending on confidence in finding positions. Thanks, salcott.
     
    salcott likes this.
  7. salcott

    salcott Supporting Member

    Aug 22, 2007
    NYC, Inwood.
    It's a tricky little passage.
     
  8. Andy Mopley

    Andy Mopley

    Sep 24, 2011
    I should add this one as well, to the list, K, from bar 7 onwards, low E to C, latter on E string, to follow the pattern?

    Thanks, appreciate the help.
     

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  9. CSBBass

    CSBBass

    Sep 21, 2013
    Can't remember if I did the A's open or on the E string when I played it this summer, but that's a pretty minor change either way and doesn't make it much easier/harder. If any of the strings are unclear, my left hand stayed in the same general area without any shifting down to first or half position at all, so definitely using the E string for the B's, C's etc.

    Was that first one from Swan Lake? I remember playing the passage but it's been ages and am not 100% sure what it was in. My fingering for that was very similar to David's.
     

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    Last edited: Oct 10, 2017
  10. This passage is a good test of cross knowledge of the fingerboard and not easy to keep a clear mind when played under pressure. There are very strong patterns of shifts between rising adjacent positions that I'm sure you are aware of. I would probably not use open A for that reason, almost relying more on the flow of patterns and my ears than reading the notes. I would definitely play the C on the E string because it leads nicely into the descending octaves.
     
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  11. CSBBass

    CSBBass

    Sep 21, 2013
    Yeah, it's a deceptively tricky passage to make it through in context. Giving the passage a play through this morning, I agree with you about the open A--closed on the E just flows better in context even if the string crossing is technically unnecessary. I'd be less likely to fudge it somehow just going with what the arm naturally wants to do that way.
     
  12. Andy Mopley

    Andy Mopley

    Sep 24, 2011
    Here's the thing though, that always amazes me...You have these little tricky passages, which are often faintly heard in the background, so what must have gone through composer's heads, simultaneously or at different times, to compose and add these in, is nothing short of brilliant. I wonder if people have their favorites.
     
  13. Les Fret

    Les Fret

    Sep 9, 2009
    Composers just don't know how hard that is on bass.
     
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  14. Neil Pye

    Neil Pye

    Apr 13, 2016
    Horsham, UK
    My absolute favourite, and my most sweat-inducing moment ever, is the solo right at the end of the Berg Violin Concerto. Almost 3 octaves, starting from the bottom D on the extension, lots of weird intervals, tricky to play in tune, but you have to get it right because the solo violin continues the phrase. Gorgeous, and almost completely un-noticed by most audiences. Last time I played that piece, the soloist turned round to watch me as I played that bit, and gave me the biggest smile I ever saw on a violinist's face
     
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