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Fingering two octave 7th chord arpeggios

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by patplaysbass, Jul 31, 2012.


  1. patplaysbass

    patplaysbass Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 7, 2011
    Los Angeles, CA
    Soon-to-be-ex Musician's Friend/Guitar Center Employee
    Specifically, I'm looking for fingerings for Fmin7, Bb7, Dmaj7, Cm7b5, A7aug, and Gdim7 two octave arpeggios. A sweep of the interwebs has turned up systems for two octave major/minor arpeggios and one octave 7th chords, but for the life of me I can't find anything past that. Any suggestions?
     
  2. patplaysbass

    patplaysbass Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 7, 2011
    Los Angeles, CA
    Soon-to-be-ex Musician's Friend/Guitar Center Employee
    Also looking for 3 octave F7. I'm in arpeggio city over here!
     
  3. Clef_de_fa

    Clef_de_fa Guest

    Dec 25, 2011
    Fmin7 have the same flat/sharp as Ebmajor

    Bb7 have the same flat/sharp as Ebmajor

    Dmaj7 is a normal major arpeggio shape ... I mean if you can play Cmaj7 then you can obviously play Dmaj7

    Cm7b5 have the same flat/sharp as Dbmajor

    A7aug is a whole tone scale ... A-B-C#-D#-E#-G-A

    Gdim7 = G-A-Bb-C-Db-Eb-E-F-G


    I think you don't find those arppegio because at that point you should explore by yourself. Find a way to play those arppegio in as much different way as possible. You will discovers the fretboard that way.
     
  4. patplaysbass

    patplaysbass Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 7, 2011
    Los Angeles, CA
    Soon-to-be-ex Musician's Friend/Guitar Center Employee
    I know how to spell the chords, what I'm asking is for a suggested approach to finding the "best" fingering. I know that varies from person to person, but I'd like to hear what other people use. I've found that whenever I try to work out my own fingerings, they're usually not nearly as effective as ways that I hadn't thought of. For example, with two octave major scales I would get up to the G string far too quickly and crawl up it for almost an entire octave until someone suggested to me E: 1-134 A: 1-134 D: 1-124 G: 134. Now my scales are much more fluid and I am looking to improve my arpeggios in a similar manner.
     
  5. Fergie Fulton

    Fergie Fulton

    Nov 22, 2008
    Braintree
    Retrovibe Artist rota
    Work them all out. Fingerings or as i call it, fret mapping, is about knowing what the options are, not what any one option is.
    That said, the option depends on the relationship to, where you are coming from, where you are, and where you are going. Because music and playing needs to flow, there is always movement, so any hesitation about your playing interrupts that flow and it losses smoothness because of it.

    So fingerings are not strict things to learn as such, the point you should learn is that you can start any arpeggio on any finger. Those four options will see you work out the best fingerings, after all you can only really start any arpeggio on one of those four fingers, after that it is where can you go to find the next notes.

    Don't worry about the over all sound or timbe of any individual note, the more you practice the more they will even out. It is just a case of learning to see the options first rather than any note quality....that will develop.
     
  6. FretlessMainly

    FretlessMainly

    Nov 17, 2010
    The answer to your question depends on the answers to these two questions:

    1. Are you playing a 4-stringer or a 5/6-stringer? These arpeggios are a bit more complicated on a 4-stringer bcause more position shifting is required.
    2. Do you want to play each note exactly like all the other notes in the arpeggio? By this, I mean do you want to pluck/pick each note, or do you want the fingerings and positions to dictate slides, hammer-ons, pull-offs, etc.? The former is more challenging than the latter in many respects (assuming you are comfortable with slides, etc.).

    I'll assume a 4-string bass and notes played with slides, hammer-ons, etc. because that's my main style.

    Aaug7: This is the most difficult of your requests due to the two major third intervallic leaps. On a 4-string bass, you need to get up the neck as soon as possible to avoid running out of strings or making ridiculous leaps.

    Try A and C# on the E string (index then pinky), index for F on the A string, then slide up to G with the index and hammer-on your pinky for A. At this point, you are in a position on the neck where major third intervals are much easier and your primary problem is solved. From the A, play C# on the 11th fret D string (index), F on the D string (pinky), and G then A on the G string (index them pinky).

    The most difficult part of this is the opening A to C# - in this case you can "cheat" and start with an open A and then play the C# on the E string with your pinky and you can pick up from there as above.

    Using a similar philosophy (move up the neck before string-crossing), you can figure out the Dom7 min7(b5), and dim7 arpeggios.
     

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