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fingering with no clink or clack

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by DeepDeath, Dec 31, 2001.


  1. when i play with a punchier tone, and playing with fingers i always clink and clack and even when im playing soft, i would have to play at the bridge to get no clack, i know jaco playing at the neck but he did it on a fretless, and im sure he did on a fretted too but he had a jazz tone.
     
  2. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    Your post is a little confusing, but try to minimize/optimize your finger movements, that way you can still play punchy with a lighter touch and clean execution.
     
  3. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    Although I haven't used the same bass as yours, I've encountered the same thing too with a recent bass.

    The solution was two-fold for me;

    1. As JMX says, a lighter touch. Let the amp and top quality strings with lots of iron in them do the work.

    2. Playing with the truss rod/bridge/saddles until the metallic "clanks" were minimized. It took me several tries.

    Also, try to notice if your string attack is hitting down, vertically, on top of the strings, as opposed to sort of "pulling" the strings from a more horizontal attack. That way, you aren't "pinging" the fret wires.
     
  4. if you are playing with a band, those noises become unnoticable, but if you are usually playing in the bedroom like I am, try this:

    Adjust your technique. Instead of pushing downward on the strings, pull them from the side.

    Turn down your treble, or if you have a tone knob, turn that down. Leading me to....

    If you still want the punchier sound, try raising your action or adjusting the truss rod.

    Play lighter. I don't like to do this, but it does help.
     
  5. Screw Jaco.. we're talking about your technique here, not his. 'mkay ?


    I'm currently in the same spot, and i've notices that there are a couple of things you can do about this :

    * Just like Fleabass89 said.. try pulling the strings parallel to the neck.

    * Learn how to play agressive, but delicate at the same time. this takes time, and it's not a bad thing to have a clang or whatever once in a while.

    * keep your fingernails short, and i mean SHORT. so before every time you play, check nails and if needed.. cut them. Nail + string = extra " poing "

    * Practice, practice, eat, practice, practice, sleep, practice, practice, eat, practice, practice, sleep, practice, pra... ( you get the point, 'eh ? :D )

    * raise the strings a little.

    peace,
     
  6. play with your fingers perpendicular to the body of the bass. the easiest way to do this is to rest your thumb on the top string or on the pup.
     
  7. I noticed the difference when I started practicing thru headphones pluged into My practice AMP. I had been pulling so hard to hear the note with the bass unpluged that I was ratteling all over the place.
     
  8. I agree with anyone who said:

    - Change your attack from vertical to horizontal.
    - Let the amp do the work. ease up on those strings.
    - Raise the bridge, adjust the truss rod. If you dont know what you are doing find someone who does or take it to a store.

    sim
     
  9. BillyBishop

    BillyBishop

    Feb 7, 2001
    Canada
    I just play closer to the bridge.
     
  10. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Those who said to make sure the string vibration angle is parallel to the fretboard were right on the money. Personally, I HATE the sound of click and clack, and I often use free strokes as a result...by using these, you can dig in a LOT harder on the string, and you can play anywhere from the neck to the bridge without clicking.
     
  11. Aaron

    Aaron

    Jun 2, 2001
    Bellingham, WA
    I was at a John Patitucci master class today and this was one of the things he was talking about. John Patitucci recomended that bassists use high action instead of softening up, so you can dig in a little more and get into it. He taught a pull-off trick to do on DB.
     
  12. whadda you mean "free strokes"?
     
  13. actuall work out how much force it requires to fret a note.

    depending on you setup and string type you may be surprised.

    rest you index finger at the 5th fret on any string, start plucking at a steady pace say,
    4/4

    as you do this sart to slowly apply pressure to the string you want to fret and stop when you have a note that sounds good to you.

    one that is clear, not muted, no harmonic sounds.

    this will show you how much force it actually takes to fret a single note, it may also show you if you have been applying too much or too little pressure.

    it's already be said, but practice.

    arppegio's and scales are good for practicing applying the correct amount of pressureand economical movement.

    stu (i love scales)
     
  14. Now for the counterpoint:

    Last night, still getting used to my new 5-stringer, i dialled in a rough metallic snarl on the Sans Amp BDDI and started getting as much clank and thunk as I could .. ended up with some deliciously ugly, heavy groove that reminded some of the basslines on PJ Harvey's "dry" ... trying to get the "clunk" perfectly consistent ... and then I'd give the pedal a stomp and play the same thing as politely and noiselessly as possible for a while .. and then get UGLY again .. :) weeeee!