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Fingering

Discussion in 'Jazz Technique [DB]' started by anonymous0726, Feb 6, 2002.


  1. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    I've committed myself to putting this down in text, and so I begin. I'll be paraphrasing my teaching method, which I call 'The Exorcises', and bringing forth only the fingerings from this approach.

    The fingerings, actually a fingering concept, that I've developed were mainly the result of two conditions that I met as a beginning student. First was that I was taught applied theory from the standpoint of music, with no consideration given as to what I was attempting to this stuff play on, and second is that I've always held in absolute contempt 'Bass Solos', or, in other words, those chopped up bass lines that some try to pass off as melody. Don't take me as completely lacking compassion on this one; Bass can be a daunting thing to play, physically, and bassists spend so much time pounding out the roots to chord changes at a semi-audible level that to reach out and fly with the Melody-Boys does require some over-achieving. Enough on this. Dismissing for now talk on melodic concepts, I want to approach only the breaching of technical limitations that The Bass presents us. Once you have the bass more 'out of your way', then melodic playing is much more easily achieved.

    Western music, as we know it, is key-based music. The skip to the end of this argument, music, as we play it, is based on the major scale. To expand on this just enough, then from the major scale we derive modes (Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, etc.) and the corresponding chords and chord scales (again, modes). If you're one of the unlucky souls that was taught your modes as stand-alone entities and not degrees of the major scale, then I would recommend some back-tracking before any of this would seem relevant (as well as music seeming tractable).

    All of the method books that that I struggled through as a student (Simandl, Rabbath, a few classical lessons with a local symphonite, etc.) gave me approaches to the bass that weren't very practical. I will admit that Rabbath was the most interesting, but I lacked the hands to play this way even on a 41 1/2" string length. ("If it hurts, stop.") But, being of the mind that the hundreds of years spent on this intrument before me had figured out the right way to play the instrument, I followed what was taught.

    For a while, anyhow. This all changed with the advent of some tapes that I made to focus my intonation and open up unexplored (for me) regions of the bass. These tapes took all of the major scales from the lowest note on the bass to the highest, and in the interest of playing the scales wherever they existed on my instrument, discovered what I call 'crossings'. These are the places on the neck where the scale lays sensibly from one side of the neck to the other in a four-fingered pattern. This is a little easier to see on The Slab, but not unknown to anyone, I would guess. Common sense dictates that you want to be in these 'sweet spots' as much as possible, but music dictates that you don't want to limit yourself to the range of an octave and a half, so, then, I had to sew these regions together.

    Another couple of personal ingredients that went into my approach that I need to add are that 1) I was blessed with strength instead of speed, and 2) I wasn't given above average muscle memory, but was given a better than average ear for pitch. This left me with a bad case of not being able to play in tune enough to keep my own skin from crawling, and the need to reduce shifting as much as I could as any shift would always require major adjustment once I got there to have my hand in the right spot.

    With all the above out of the way, here are some qualities that a good concept of fingering should possess:
    • All scales finger the same, or at least similarly (transitions into TP and 3-finger to 4 finger being the altering factors). This would be analogous to learning theory by the numbers rather than purely by rote, as the permutations of music are infinite, thus you're really lost without the math.
    • Scales are achieved with as few shifts as possible -- shifting is laborious and prone to intonation problems and speed limitations.
    • The number of different shapes that your hand must take should be minimal. This goes back to my muscle-memory weakness. Learn as little as possible to get the job done. The less you know, the better you will know what it is that you know.
    • A fingering system allows you the freedom to ascend or descend instantly without awkward movement.
    • A fingering system that should leave you in such a position that you have access to all elements of harmony being convenient -- arpeggios, neighboring tones, chord-scales, etc.
    • A fingering system that allows you to easily choose where on the bass you want to play what you are playing, for example balancing speed v. tone as far as string length is concerned, etc.
    • A fingering system wherein you find yourself wedged against the long side of the fingerboard as little as possible, allowing shifting 'by choice' rather than by necessity.
    • A fingering system that is based on music rather than what is based on what seems to be 'elegant' on the bass (i.e., Simandl)
    • A fingering system that won't injure you. (i.e, Rabbath)
    Now, granted, there is not a system that will cover all things all of the time, but my system covers most of these requirements.
     
  2. vanderbrook

    vanderbrook Some days, I miss frets... Supporting Member

    Aug 21, 2001
    Denver, CO, USA
    Keep it up, Ray. I taught myself the instrument in my twenties, and just recently (in my forties) concluded a period of nearly 10 years away from the instrument. I've finally committed to breaking my worst bad habits; I found myself a teacher, and received the Rabbath text he recommended from Lemur last week. I'm very interested to see where you're going!
     
  3. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    From playing The Slab and also spending quite a bit of effort on guitar, which I played mainly in teaching bass, it became clear that the major scale is most practical when approached with a four-finger (fret) pattern. On guitar, being that the string length is so short, there are other things that can be done, but even on The Slab the string length is long enough that a four-fret approach is the only way that is practical. The bottom 2/3 of The Bass, though, is so large that a 4 'fret' approach is impractical because of the string length of the average bass. What I have striven to do is to somehow achieve the agility of four fingers on a mostly three-finger instrument.

    My approach won't seem that different at the bottom of the bass. Some shifts are only subtley different. The early shifts will enable better position when you get the the second and third octaves of the bass when working out the scales, and more immediately when working on melodic concepts at the bottom of the bass. In Thumb-position (TP) my approach gets radically different from what is traditionally taught.

    Here is the point of departure:

    Basing my concept on the Slab major scale fingering of:
    2-4 (can be read 1-4 for the purposes of The Bass)
    1-2-4
    1-3-4
    (1-3-4 on the next string will give you the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th degrees of the scale)
    • Notice the notes that happen under the first finger; Root, third, and the sixth.
    • It also may be helpful to notice that the second, fifth, and the octave lay under the fourth finger.
    • Notice here that if you start your scale on the E string, you can play up to the fourth mode and up to the six-chord arpeggio without having to shift, neighboring tones (1/2 step below and scale-step above each note) are accessible with little shifting at all (I have students roll on the thumb rather than shift for this type of thing)
    What I do is to keep my hand 'in position' as much as is practical, wherein your first finger will be on the 1st, 3rd, and sixth. The basis behind what I do is this simple, but when studied will yield drastically different results in the way that things are fingered.
     
  4. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    Thumb position is very, very simple as I approach it. One-finger-per-half step. The thumb is no different than any other finger. Period.

    As with anything, you can come up with examples of exceptions. There are things that I do that fall outside of this because of convenience, but almost without fail this is the way that I play. Thumb position is naturally four-fingerable, so there isn't any need to fuss with it.

    I've had explained to me how all of the different TP fingers are used -- chomatic, major scale, and on. These are completely useless as far as I'm concerned. Sure, they can be reached, but why have to train your hand to handle the infinite possible reaches that you will have to cover in this fashion. Aside from getting you out of key-position, let's do a little quick math on what can happen in one octave of TP:

    Let's take these traditional TP fingerings: Chromatic, scale, and whole-step. This creates three distinct fingerings from each note, times twelve notes, times 4 strings, gives 144 distinct fingerings for one octave. With a singular fingering (mine), divide this by three and you have 48. I make a distinction here between the four strings because the feel from side-to-side on the fingerboard are less natural in TP than on the bottom of the bass.

    My points are, then:
    • Reduce as much as possible the things that you have to train yourself to do; get rid of the extraneous.
    • Choose fingerings based on music rather than what 'can be done' on the bass.
     
  5. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    Since the initial idea of these were born out of learning the scale everywhere it exists on the neck, I will suggest that you systematically cover the entire neck as follows:
    • Play the scale from the lowest (scale) note on the bass to the highest and back
    • From the lowest note, ascend in the lowest crossing to a target string, take the string to the next crossing, cross up to the G string, continue to the highest note, and then return -- using the same fingering!
    • Do this for all four strings for each crossing, and also, in the example of the middle crossings, for three-fingered and four-fingered approaches
    • The best results are achieved from practicing these with a guide, i.e. the exercise that you're doing recorded with a clean-pitched sound with which you can play unison (other intervals -- 3rds, 5ths, octaves, etc. are great as well)
    • Brandish the Stick'O Pain

    Some more quick math: In the first example that I'll use, F, there are four crossings; at the low F (using open strings), where the first F on the A string lays, where F again appears on the E string (just about the 'double dot'), and where F again appears on the A string (way the heck up there). Throw out the first crossing as you traverse this one every time, you have three times four strings, or twelve passes through the scale to complete this exercise once for the F scale. Given this, you'll rarely have time to go through all scales in one day, and you'll also find that it's easier to measure the exercise in minutes rather than 'passes' as you'll invariably forget where you are in a predetermined series, and you'll also want to spend some extra passes on a trouble area.

    Safety note: If you fatigue or experience pain, then stop. The old adage, "No pain, no gain" doesn't apply here. Discomfort either indicates that you're doing something wrong, or that you are trying to do something that isn't physically possible for you. Pay attention to your parts if they start to complain -- they mean it!
     
  6. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    I want to digress just slightly before digging in to the F scale and give you the chromatic scale (red text indicates TP, with the finger numbered 1-4 with the thumb being '1'):

    (O-1-2-4) (1-2-4) (1-2-4) (1-2-3) (1-2-3-4) (1-2-3-4) (1-2-3-4)

    This will get you two octaves on each string. (For the purposes of this example I'll let you plug in your own note names.) This will get you used to using all four fingers as tone fingers in TP if this is something new for you. This saves you one shift in TP. Also note that for all of this stuff, your fingerings are going to vary depending on the size and shape of your bass, hands, etc.

    Now, finally, on to the F scale.

    The First Crossing
    Code:
    E string
    (1 - 4)
    (F - G)
    
    A string
    (O - 1 - 4)
    (A - Bb- C)
    
    D string
    (O - 2 - 4)
    (D - E - F) 
    
    G string
    (O - 2)(1 - 4)(1 - 4)(1 - 3)[COLOR=crimson](1 - 2 - 4)(1 - 3)(1 - 3)(1 - 2 - 3)[/COlOR]
    (G - A)(Bb- C)(D - E)(F - G)(A - Bb- C)(D - E)(F - G)(A - Bb- C)
    
    [i]or, to stick with the plan in extreme…[/i]
    
    D string
    (O - 2)(1 - 4)
    (D - E)(F - G) 
     
    G string (commas indicate a roll on the thumb as opposed to a full shift)
    (1, 1 - 4)(1 - 4)(1 - 3)[COLOR=crimson](1 - 2 - 4)(1 - 3)(1 - 3)(1 - 2 - 3)[/COLOR]
    (A, Bb- C)(D - E)(F - G)(A - Bb- C)(D - E)(F - G)(A - Bb- C)
    The Second Crossing
    Code:
    
    [b]...up the G string.[/b]
    
    E string
    (1 - 4)
    (F - G)
    
    A string
    (O - 1 - 4)
    (A - Bb - C)
    
    D string
    (O - 2 - 4)
    (D - E - F) 
    
    G string [i](identical for all crossings)[/i]
    (O - 2) (1 - 4) (1 - 4) (1 - 3) [COLOR=crimson](1 - 2 - 4) (1 - 3)(1 - 3) (1 - 2 - 3)[/COLOR]
    (G - A) (Bb - C)(D - E) (F - G) (A - Bb - C)(D - E)(F - G) (A - Bb- C)
    
    
    [b]...up the D String.[/b]
    
    E string
    (1 - 4)
    (F - G)
    
    A string
    (O - 1 - 4)
    (A - Bb - C)
    
    D string
    (O - 2) (1 - 4) (1 - 2 - 4)  or (1, 1 - 4)
    (D - E) (F - G) (A - Bb- C) 
    
    G string
    (1 - 3)(1 - 3)[COLOR=crimson](1 - 2 - 4) (1 - 3)(2 - 4)(1 - 2 - 3)[/COLOR]
    (D - E)(F - G)(A - Bb- C) (D - E)(F - G)(A - Bb- C)
    
    [b]...up the A String.[/b]
    
    E string
    (1 - 4)
    (F - G)
    
    A string
    (O - 1 - 4)(1 - 4) (2 - 4) or (1 - 4)
    (A - Bb- C)(D - E) (F - G)
    
    D string
    (1 - 2 - 4) 
    (A - Bb- C)
    
    G string
    (1 - 3)(1 - 3)[COLOR=crimson](1 - 2 - 4) (1 - 3)(2 - 4)(1 - 2 - 3)[/COLOR]
    (D - E)(F - G)(A - Bb- C) (D - E)(F - G)(A - Bb- C)
    
    
    [b]... up the E String.[/b]
    
    E string
    (1 - 4)(2 - 4) (1 - 4)
    (F - G)(A - Bb)(C - D)
    
    A string
    (1 - 2 - 4)
    (E - F - G)
    
    D string
    (1 - 2 - 4) 
    (A - Bb- C)
    
    G string
    (1 - 3)(2 - 4)[COLOR=crimson](1 - 2 - 4) (1 - 3)(2 - 4)(1 - 2 - 3)[/COLOR]
    (D - E)(F - G)(A - Bb- C) (D - E)(F - G)(A - Bb- C)
    
     
  7. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    The 3rd Crossing (The first thumb position crossing)

    The next crossing will take us across the fingerboard where F is on the E string, just above where the 'double-dot' would be on The Slab.
    Code:
    [b]...up the G String.[/b]
    E string
    (1 - 4)
    (F - G)
    
    A string
    (O - 1 - 4)
    (A - Bb - C)
    
    D string
    (O - 2 - 4)
    (D - E - F) 
    
    G string
    (O - 2) (1 - 4) (1 - 4) (1 - 3) [COLOR=crimson](1 - 2 - 4) (1 - 3)(1 - 3) (1 - 2 - 3)[/COLOR]
    (G - A) (Bb - C)(D - E) (F - G) (A - Bb - C)(D - E)(F - G) (A - Bb - C)
    
    
    [b]...up the D String.[/b]
    
    E string
    (1 - 4)
    (F - G)
    
    A string
    (O - 1 - 4)
    (A - Bb - C)
    
    D string
    (O - 2) (1 - 4) (1 - 2 - 4) [COLOR=crimson](1 - 3) (2 - 4) [/COLOR]
    (D - E) (F - G) (A - Bb- C) (D - E) (F - G)
    
    G string
    [COLOR=crimson](1 - 2 - 4) (1 - 3) (2 - 4) (1 - 2 - 3)[/COLOR]
    (A - Bb- C) (D - E) (F - G) (A - Bb- C)
    
    [b]...up the A String.[/b]
    
    E string
    (1 - 4)
    (F - G)
    
    A string
    (O - 1 - 4)(1 - 4) (1 - 4)[COLOR=crimson] (1 - 2 - 4)[/COLOR]
    (A - Bb- C)(D - E) (F - G) (A - Bb- C) 
    
    D string
    [COLOR=crimson](1 - 3) (2 - 4)[/COLOR]
    (D - E) (F - G) 
    
    G string
    [COLOR=crimson](1 - 2 - 4) (1 - 3) (2 - 4) (1 - 2 - 3)[/COLOR]
    (A - Bb- C) (D - E) (F - G) (A - Bb- C)
    
    [b]...up the E String.[/b]
    
    E string
    (1 - 4)(2 - 4) (1 - 4) [COLOR=crimson](1 - 2 - 4) [/color]
    (F - G)(A - Bb)(C - D) (E - F - G)
    
    A string
    [COLOR=crimson](1 - 2 - 4)[/COLOR]
    (A - Bb- C)
    
    D string
    [COLOR=crimson](1 - 3) (2 - 4)  [/COLOR]
    (D - E) (F - G) 
    
    G string
    [COLOR=crimson](1 - 2 - 4) (1 - 3) (2 - 4) (1 - 2 - 3)[/COLOR]
    (A - Bb- C) (D - E) (F - G) (A - Bb- C)
    
    Note that there are some choices in shifts when you arrive in TP. If you want me to point these out, let me know. They shouldn't be too difficult to figure out, though, so I put the shifts that are comfortable for me.
     
  8. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    The 4th Crossing (Way up there)

    The next crossing will take us across the fingerboard where F is on the A string again, way up high.

    Safety note: As this is way up the neck and can possibly put you in an awkward position, be careful that you're not hurting yourself on this crossing. Listen closely to your body -- if there are 'complaints', stop!

    Code:
    [b]...up the G String[/b]
    E string
    (1 - 4)
    (F - G)
    
    A string
    (O - 1 - 4)
    (A - Bb - C)
    
    D string
    (O - 2 - 4)
    (D - E - F) 
    
    G string
    (O - 2) (1 - 4) (1 - 4) (1 - 3) [color=crimson](1 - 2 - 4) (1 - 3)(1 - 3) (1 - 2 - 3)[/color]
    (G - A) (Bb - C)(D - E) (F - G) (A - Bb - C)(D - E)(F - G) (A - Bb - C)
    
    
    [b]...up the D String.[/b]
    
    E string
    (1 - 4)
    (F - G)
    
    A string
    (O - 1 - 4)
    (A - Bb - C)
    
    D string
    (O - 2) (1 - 4) (1 - 2 - 4) [color=crimson](1 - 3) (1 – 3) (1 – 2 - 4) [/color]
    (D - E) (F - G) (A - Bb- C) (D - E) (F - G) (A – Bb- C)
    
    G string
    [color=crimson](1 – 3) (2 – 4) (1 – 2 - 3)[/color]
    (D – E) (F - G) (A - Bb- C)
    
    [b]...up the A String.[/b]
    
    E string
    (1 - 4)
    (F - G)
    
    A string
    (O - 1 - 4)(1 - 4) (1 - 4) [color=crimson](1 - 2 - 4) (1 – 3) (2 – 4)[/color]
    (A - Bb- C)(D - E) (F - G) (A - Bb- C) (D – E) (F – G)
    
    D string
    [color=crimson](1 – 2 - 4) [/color]
    (A – Bb- C)
     
    G string
    [color=crimson](1 – 3) (2 – 4) (1 – 2 - 3)[/color]
    (D – E) (F - G) (A - Bb- C)
    
    [b]...up the E String.[/b]
    
    E string
    (1 - 4)(2 - 4) (1 - 4) [color=crimson](1 - 2 – 4) (1 – 2 – 4)[/color]
    (F - G)(A - Bb)(C - D) (E - F - G) (A – Bb– C)
    
    A string
    [color=crimson](1 – 3) (2 – 4)[/color]
    (D – E) (F – G)
     
    D string
    [color=crimson](1 – 2 - 4) [/color]
    (A – Bb- C)
     
    G string
    [color=crimson](1 – 3) (2 – 4) (1 – 2 - 3)[/color]
    (D – E) (F - G) (A - Bb- C)
    
     
  9. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    The C scale will begin to demonstrate how I propose that thumb position is to be entered a bit earlier than is traditionally taught. Open strings could be used at the first crossing, but I will use the closed-position fingering.

    After playing this refer back to the F scale and see the when(F – G)is played on the G string with(1 – 3), your hand can be in thumb position already if you’re heading up further from there or hanging around the area for a while.

    The First Crossing
    Code:
    E string 
    (O - 1 - 4)
    (E - F - G)
    
    A string
    (O – 2)(1 - 4)
    (A – B)(C - D)
    
    D string
    (1, 1 - 4) [i]or (1 – 2, 4)[/i]
    (E, F - G) 
    
    G string
    (1 - 4) (1 - 4)[color=crimson](1 - 2 - 4)(1 - 3)(2 - 4)(1 - 2 - 3)(1 – 3 - 4)[/color]
    (A - B) (C - D)(E – F - G)(A - B)(C - D)(E - F - G)(A - B - C)
    
    Second Crossing

    The next crossing will take us across the fingerboard where the first C is on the E string.
    Code:
    [b]...up the G String.[/b]
    E string 
    (O - 1 - 4)
    (E - F - G)
    
    A string
    (O – 2)(1 - 4)
    (A – B)(C - D)
    
    D string
    (1, 1 - 4)
    (E, F - G) 
    
    G string
    (1 - 4) (1 - 4)[color=crimson](1 - 2 - 4)(1 - 3)(2 - 4)(1 - 2 - 4)(1 – 3 - 4)[/color]
    (A - B) (C - D)(E – F - G)(A - B)(C - D)(E - F - G)(A - B - C)
    
    [b]...up the D String.[/b]
    E string 
    (O - 1 - 4)
    (E - F - G)
    
    A string
    (O – 2)(1 – 4) 
    (A – B)(C - D)
    
    D string
    (1, 1 - 4)(1 – 4)[color=crimson](2 – 4) [/color]
    (E, F - G)(A - B)(C – D)
     
    G string
    [color=crimson](1 – 2 - 4)(1 - 3)(2 - 4)(1 - 2 - 4)(1 – 3 - 4)[/color]
    (E – F – G)(A - B)(C - D)(E - F - G)(A - B - C)
    
    [b]...up the A String.[/b]
    E string 
    (O - 1 - 4)
    (E - F - G)
    
    A string
    (O – 2)(1 - 4)(1 - 2 – 4)
    (A – B)(C - D)(E - F – G)
     
    D string
    (1 - 3)[color=crimson](2 – 4)[/color]
    (A - B)(C – D)
     
    G string
    [color=crimson](1 – 2 - 4)(1 - 3)(2 - 4)(1 - 2 - 4)(1 – 3 - 4)[/color]
    (E – F – G)(A - B)(C - D)(E - F - G)(A - B - C)
    
    [b]...up the E String[/b]
    
    E string 
    (O - 1 - 4)(1 – 4)(2 - 4)
    (E - F - G)(A – B)(C – D)
     
    A string
    (1 – 2 - 4)
    (E – F - G)
     
    D string
    (1 – 3)[color=crimson](2 – 4)[/color]
    (A – B)(C – D)
     
    G string
    [color=crimson](1 – 2 - 4)(1 - 3)(2 - 4)(1 - 2 - 4)(1 – 3 - 4)[/color]
    (E – F – G)(A - B)(C - D)(E - F - G)(A - B - C)
    
    Third and fourth crossings for C should appear sometime tomorrow...
     
  10. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    C – Third Crossing

    The next crossing will take us across the fingerboard where the first C is on the A string again.

    Code:
    [b]...up the G String.[/b]
    E string 
    (O - 1 - 4)
    (E - F - G)
    
    A string
    (O – 2)(1 - 4)
    (A – B)(C - D)
    
    D string
    (1, 1 - 4)
    (E, F - G) 
    
    G string
    (1 - 4) (1 - 4)[color=crimson](1 - 2 - 4)(1 - 3)(2 - 4)(1 - 2 - 4)(1 – 3 - 4)[/color]
    (A - B) (C - D)(E – F - G)(A - B)(C - D)(E - F - G)(A - B - C)
    
    [b]...up the D String.[/b]
    E string 
    (O - 1 - 4)
    (E - F - G)
    
    A string
    (O – 2)(1 – 4) 
    (A – B)(C - D)
    
    D string
    (1, 1 - 4)(1 – 4)[color=crimson](2 – 4)(1 – 2 - 4)[/color]
    (E, F - G)(A - B)(C – D)(E – F - G)
     
    G string
    [color=crimson](1 - 3)(2 - 4)(1 - 2 - 4)(1 – 3 - 4)[/color]
    (A - B)(C - D)(E - F - G)(A - B - C)
    
    [b]...up the A String.[/b]
    E string 
    (O - 1 - 4)
    (E - F - G)
    
    A string
    (O – 2)(1 - 4)(1 - 2 – 4)[color=crimson](1 - 3)(2 - 4)[/color]
    (A – B)(C - D)(E - F – G)(A - B)(C - D)
     
    D string
    [color=crimson](1 - 2 – 4)[/color]
    (E – F - G)
     
    G string
    [color=crimson](1 - 3)(2 - 4)(1 - 2 - 4)(1 – 3 - 4)
    (A - B)(C - D)(E - F - G)(A - B - C)[/color]
    
    [b]...up the E String.[/b]
    
    E string 
    (O - 1 - 4)(1 – 4)(1 - 4)[color=crimson](1 – 2 - 4)[/color]
    (E - F - G)(A – B)(C – D)(E – F - G)
     
    A string
    [color=crimson](1 – 3)(2 - 4)[/color]
    (A – B)(C - D)
     
    D string
    [color=crimson](1 – 2 - 4)[/color]
    (E – F - G)
     
    G string
    [color=crimson](1 - 3)(2 - 4)(1 - 2 - 4)(1 – 3 - 4)[/color]
    (A - B)(C - D)(E - F - G)(A - B - C)
    

    C – Fourth Crossing

    The next crossing will take us across the fingerboard where the first C is on the E string again, way up there.
    Code:
    [b]...up the G String.[/b]
    E string 
    (O - 1 - 4)
    (E - F - G)
    
    A string
    (O – 2)(1 - 4)
    (A – B)(C - D)
    
    D string
    (1, 1 - 4)
    (E, F - G) 
    
    G string
    (1 - 4) (1 - 4)[color=crimson](1 - 2 - 4)(1 - 3)(2 - 4)(1 - 2 - 4)(1 – 3 - 4)[/color]
    (A - B) (C - D)(E – F - G)(A - B)(C - D)(E - F - G)(A - B - C)
    
    [b]...up the D String.[/b]
    E string 
    (O - 1 - 4)
    (E - F - G)
    
    A string
    (O – 2)(1 – 4) 
    (A – B)(C - D)
    
    D string
    (1, 1 - 4)(1 – 4)[color=crimson](2 – 4)(1 – 2 - 4)(1 - 3)(2 - 4)[/color]
    (E, F - G)(A - B)(C – D)(E – F - G)(A - B)(C - D)
     
    G string
    [color=crimson](1 - 2 - 4)(1 – 3 - 4)[/color]
    (E - F - G)(A - B - C)
    
    [b]...up the A String.[/b]
    E string 
    (O - 1 - 4)
    (E - F - G)
    
    A string
    (O – 2)(1 - 4)(1 - 2 – 4)[color=crimson](1 - 3)(2 - 4)(1 – 2 - 4)[/color]
    (A – B)(C - D)(E - F – G)(A - B)(C - D)(E – F - G)
     
    D string
    [color=crimson](1 - 3)(2 - 4)[/color]
    (A - B)(C - D)
     
    G string
    [color=crimson](1 - 2 - 4)(1 – 3 - 4)[/color]
    (E - F - G)(A - B - C)
    
    [b]...up the E String.[/b]
    E string 
    (O - 1 - 4)(1 – 4)(1 - 4)[color=crimson](1 – 2 - 4)(1 - 3)(2 - 4)[/color]
    (E - F - G)(A – B)(C – D)(E – F - G)(A - B)(C - D)
     
    A string
    [color=crimson](1 – 2 - 4)[/color]
    (E – F - G)
     
    D string
    [color=crimson](1 – 3)(2 - 4)[/color]
    (A – B)(C – D)
     
    G string
    [color=crimson](1 - 2 - 4)(1 – 3 - 4)[/color]
    (E - F - G)(A - B - C)
    
    Ok. That should be enough to give a show of what I'm up to. Meet me in 'Fingering (Discussion)'?
     
  11. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
  12. i have to say this has helped me soo much
    thank you!