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Finish Repair Question for MIM Jazz Bass

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by ANCIENTSOCIETY, Jan 9, 2018.


  1. ANCIENTSOCIETY

    ANCIENTSOCIETY

    May 18, 2016
    Las Vegas
    Hello TB,

    I recently picked up a 1999 MIM Jazz Bass for a good price. It's in decent shape for a 18 year old bass. It had a bunch of rust and grime, but a few rags, windex and 2000 grit sandpaper took care of that. I've got everything to cover fretwork and setup, but the bass has some deep finish cracks that look like they could have come from a fall. My first idea is to fill them in out with CA glue and then smoothen them out. I want the repair to be close to invisible, which might be asking a lot. Any ideas on refinishing? what kind of finish do these bases have? Polyurethane? Lacquer? Is it even possible to dye CA glue? The guitar also has some yellowing from age and I would like to somehow match the color.

    Thanks for all the support thus far, I'm on my path and this forum has helped me avoid obstacles that come from trying to figure out it all on my own.

    FullSizeRender (1). FullSizeRender (2). FullSizeRender.
     
  2. sissy kathy

    sissy kathy Back to Bass-ics Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2014
    Arbutus, MD
    That yellowing is much sought after by some. If you want to preserve the color (I wouldn't) then wick some thin CA under any areas that are lifting then fill the cracks to seal the wood. Don't add so much that you need to sand afterwards. and live with it.
     
    Stumbo likes this.
  3. Stumbo

    Stumbo Wherever you go, there you are. Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 11, 2008
    the Cali Intergalctic Mind Space
    Song Surgeon slow downer software- full 4 hour demo
    You git that bass looking pretty good! Looks like poly cracks. Doesn't look like any dents so probably just drying out.

    Yellowing is good for old basses. Seal the cracks.
     
  4. ANCIENTSOCIETY

    ANCIENTSOCIETY

    May 18, 2016
    Las Vegas
    I hear ya on that one. I'm guessing the cracks would still be visible but at least no further damage right?
     
    sissy kathy likes this.
  5. sissy kathy

    sissy kathy Back to Bass-ics Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2014
    Arbutus, MD
    Yeah, I think so.
     
  6. ANCIENTSOCIETY

    ANCIENTSOCIETY

    May 18, 2016
    Las Vegas
    Would it be a good idea to put some naphtha or some sort of thinner to make it fill in easier?

    Could I use something like these?

    https://www.amazon.com/Rust-Oleum-2...515544197&sr=8-2&keywords=white+lacquer+paint

    https://www.amazon.com/3M-05203-Mar...515544263&sr=8-27&keywords=polyurethane+paint

    Thank you.
     
  7. Stumbo

    Stumbo Wherever you go, there you are. Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 11, 2008
    the Cali Intergalctic Mind Space
    Song Surgeon slow downer software- full 4 hour demo
    Is the paint coming away from the wood?
     
  8. ANCIENTSOCIETY

    ANCIENTSOCIETY

    May 18, 2016
    Las Vegas
    No it is not.
     
  9. Stumbo

    Stumbo Wherever you go, there you are. Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 11, 2008
    the Cali Intergalctic Mind Space
    Song Surgeon slow downer software- full 4 hour demo
    Since the paint is stable, I would consider leaving it.
    I don't think there would be an "invisible" repair for this.
    CA may soften the paint.

    Maybe Johnk_10 may chime in.
     
    ANCIENTSOCIETY likes this.
  10. 202dy

    202dy Supporting Member

    Sep 26, 2006
    Naphtha to pull the oil soluble dirt from the cracks. Follow with de-ionized water to remove what the naphtha leaves behind. A cleaner, lighter crack will not be as visible.

    Getting paint into the cracks is a real chore. If you are intent on doing it:

    • Clean first as above
    • Wax the existing finish
    • Mask the existing finish
    • Mix desired color
    • Brush or toothpick to pull some color or
    • Spray (airbrush, Preval, or similar)
    • Allow to dry
    • Remove masking
    Follow up with a light coat of liquid thin CA.

    The idea is to minimize the look of the crack.

    Another alternative is to use lacquer burn in sticks. If you have not used them it would behoove them to practice on scrap. More than a couple of times, that is. With a careful eye for blending a very good match can be obtained.

    The downside to all of these methods is that the repair and the surrounding finish will age at a different rate and eventually will show.

    Take your pick.

    Or you can clean it and leave it alone.
     
  11. Oren Hudson

    Oren Hudson

    Dec 25, 2007
    Gastonia, NC
    Leave it be, IMO. :thumbsup:
     
    ANCIENTSOCIETY likes this.

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